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Berkshire (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 24
cross the Connecticut River, pass through what is called the Gap in the White Mountains to Portland, Me., and thence to Boston; then, on the Western Railroad, to Berkshire, in the western part of Massachusetts; again to Trenton Falls (you will not miss another sight of them); thence back to the North River; and, descending the rived hear it. This will be a literary festival, characteristic of the country, and everybody will be glad to see you. I am going, for a few days, among the hills of Berkshire with my sisters; but I shall always be within hail from Boston. Good-night. As ever, ever yours, Charles Sumner. To Professor Mittermaier, Heidelberg. Bfail to enjoy Catskill and West Point. They are both inexpressibly fine. I doubt if Theodore Sedgwick is at Stockbridge now. I wish you could see the hills of Berkshire, and the green shade which embowers the railroad between Pittsfield and Springfield; then the valley of the Connecticut,—at least, as far as Northampton, a lovel
Mount Auburn (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 24
w's Psalm of Life saved me from suicide. I first found it on a scrap of newspaper, in the hands of two Irish women, soiled and worn; and I was at once touched by it. Think, my dear friend, of this soul, into which you have poured the waters of life. Such a tribute is higher than the words of Rogers, much as I value them. The death of Dr. Channing is a great sorrow,—not so much for his friends as for truth, humanity, and benevolence. He died Oct. 2, at Bennington, and was buried at Mount Auburn. I passed last evening with his daughter, and conversed freely about her father and his last days. I love his memory very much. He had been for years a very kind friend of mine. It is after midnight; so I will to bed, wishing you a thousand blessings. Ever affectionately yours, Charles Sumner. To his brother George, he wrote, in October, 1842:— You will see that Dr. Channing is dead. So passed away one of the purest, brightest, greatest minds of this age. He has been
Austria (Austria) (search for this): chapter 24
cised by the British Government in the suppression of the slave-trade, and to the nature and validity of a master's claim to a slave when asserted on the high seas, in the port of a foreign power, or anywhere outside of the jurisdiction of the municipal law which sanctions his ownership. The right of search, unless specially conceded by treaty, is a purely belligerent right, and does not exist in time of peace. By the treaty of 1841, known as the Quintuple Treaty, between Great Britain, Austria, Prussia, and Russia, the slave-trade was declared piracy, and a mutual right of search given. France, acting under the influence of Mr. Cass and Mr. Wheaton, refused to ratify it. The slave-traders often hoisted the American flag in order to protect themselves from search and capture. Great Britain asserted the right to stop vessels flying the American colors under circumstances which justified a strong suspicion that they were engaged in the slave-trade, and that, though carrying our fl
West Point (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 24
e to Boston; then, on the Western Railroad, to Berkshire, in the western part of Massachusetts; again to Trenton Falls (you will not miss another sight of them); thence back to the North River; and, descending the river, stop at Catskill and at West Point. Is this not a good plot? Cannot you be present at the annual Commencement of Harvard University (our Cambridge), the last Wednesday in August? Story delivers a discourse on the day before, in commemoration of the second centennial annivery. From New York I hastened back to Lenox; thence to Lebanon, where I fell in with President Van Buren; thence to Saratoga, where I saw Miss Sedgwick, Mrs. C——, and Miss A——L——; thence to Catskill and the Falls, which I admired very much, West Point, New York, and home. . . . I thank you, my dear Henry, for the words of comfort which you gave me in your last note. I need them all, and shall lay them to heart. God grant that you may be happy! A beautiful career is before you, with opport
Bennington, Vt. (Vermont, United States) (search for this): chapter 24
think I may say that Longfellow's Psalm of Life saved me from suicide. I first found it on a scrap of newspaper, in the hands of two Irish women, soiled and worn; and I was at once touched by it. Think, my dear friend, of this soul, into which you have poured the waters of life. Such a tribute is higher than the words of Rogers, much as I value them. The death of Dr. Channing is a great sorrow,—not so much for his friends as for truth, humanity, and benevolence. He died Oct. 2, at Bennington, and was buried at Mount Auburn. I passed last evening with his daughter, and conversed freely about her father and his last days. I love his memory very much. He had been for years a very kind friend of mine. It is after midnight; so I will to bed, wishing you a thousand blessings. Ever affectionately yours, Charles Sumner. To his brother George, he wrote, in October, 1842:— You will see that Dr. Channing is dead. So passed away one of the purest, brightest, greatest
Hell Gate (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 24
ieve me ever, my dear Mr. Mittermaier, Very sincerely yours, Charles Sumner. To Longfellow he wrote, Aug. 20, 1842:— I have been away on a short journey with my two sisters, Mary and Julia, and have enjoyed not a little their enjoyment of life and new scenes. Howe started in company. We went to Springfield; thence made an excursion to Chicopee; thence to Lenox and Stockbridge, where I left the girls to ramble about, while Howe and I started on a journey to New York, including Hell Gate, where we passed the chief of our time. The Three Graces were bland and lovely. From New York I hastened back to Lenox; thence to Lebanon, where I fell in with President Van Buren; thence to Saratoga, where I saw Miss Sedgwick, Mrs. C——, and Miss A——L——; thence to Catskill and the Falls, which I admired very much, West Point, New York, and home. . . . I thank you, my dear Henry, for the words of comfort which you gave me in your last note. I need them all, and shall lay them to h
Springfield (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 24
arles Sumner. To Longfellow he wrote, Aug. 20, 1842:— I have been away on a short journey with my two sisters, Mary and Julia, and have enjoyed not a little their enjoyment of life and new scenes. Howe started in company. We went to Springfield; thence made an excursion to Chicopee; thence to Lenox and Stockbridge, where I left the girls to ramble about, while Howe and I started on a journey to New York, including Hell Gate, where we passed the chief of our time. The Three Graces wefail to enjoy Catskill and West Point. They are both inexpressibly fine. I doubt if Theodore Sedgwick is at Stockbridge now. I wish you could see the hills of Berkshire, and the green shade which embowers the railroad between Pittsfield and Springfield; then the valley of the Connecticut,—at least, as far as Northampton, a lovely village. But Catskill and West Point are better worth seeing even than all these. Ever affectionately yours, Charles Sumner. To Lord Morpeth. Boston, Oct.
Stockbridge (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 24
ositions of the law of nations. But where slavery occurs, then he falls like Lucifer! I note your programme for the North River; but I have been the length of that river three times, in the course of this summer, and my time is limited; so that I must see you in New York, in order to enjoy the last of you, and give you a parting God speed! Let me know when you sail. Do not fail to enjoy Catskill and West Point. They are both inexpressibly fine. I doubt if Theodore Sedgwick is at Stockbridge now. I wish you could see the hills of Berkshire, and the green shade which embowers the railroad between Pittsfield and Springfield; then the valley of the Connecticut,—at least, as far as Northampton, a lovely village. But Catskill and West Point are better worth seeing even than all these. Ever affectionately yours, Charles Sumner. To Lord Morpeth. Boston, Oct. 1, 1842. my dear Morpeth,—As long as I could, I observed you on the taffrail of the Great Western, and then moved
Pittsfield (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 24
e North River; but I have been the length of that river three times, in the course of this summer, and my time is limited; so that I must see you in New York, in order to enjoy the last of you, and give you a parting God speed! Let me know when you sail. Do not fail to enjoy Catskill and West Point. They are both inexpressibly fine. I doubt if Theodore Sedgwick is at Stockbridge now. I wish you could see the hills of Berkshire, and the green shade which embowers the railroad between Pittsfield and Springfield; then the valley of the Connecticut,—at least, as far as Northampton, a lovely village. But Catskill and West Point are better worth seeing even than all these. Ever affectionately yours, Charles Sumner. To Lord Morpeth. Boston, Oct. 1, 1842. my dear Morpeth,—As long as I could, I observed you on the taffrail of the Great Western, and then moved away, melancholy and slow. Lieber and Sedgwick dined with me at the Astor; and we consoled ourselves for your departu
Hampton Roads (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 24
y, with the comprehensive grasp of a publicist dealing with the general law of nations, and not with the municipal doctrines of a particular country. Letters approving his view came also from Rufus Choate and Theodore Sedgwick. The peculiar character of slave ownership as against common right, and existing only under positive municipal law, became at this time the subject of earnest discussion. While the brig Creole, an American merchant vessel, was on her voyage, in 1841, from Hampton Roads to New Orleans, with one hundred and thirty-five slaves on board, a part of them rose in mutiny, killed a passenger who was the reputed owner of some of the slaves, wounded a number of the officers and crew, and having obtained complete possession of the vessel, carried her into the English port of Nassau. The slaves were there liberated, although some were held for a while under arrest for the assaults. There was a question as to the extent to which the colonial authorities interfered
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