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Nassau River (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 24
ting only under positive municipal law, became at this time the subject of earnest discussion. While the brig Creole, an American merchant vessel, was on her voyage, in 1841, from Hampton Roads to New Orleans, with one hundred and thirty-five slaves on board, a part of them rose in mutiny, killed a passenger who was the reputed owner of some of the slaves, wounded a number of the officers and crew, and having obtained complete possession of the vessel, carried her into the English port of Nassau. The slaves were there liberated, although some were held for a while under arrest for the assaults. There was a question as to the extent to which the colonial authorities interfered to effect their liberation, positive and officious interference being alleged on the one side and denied on the other. The affair was presented to the attention of the British Government by a formal letter addressed by Mr. Webster, then Secretary of State, to Mr. Stevenson, our Minister in London. The Secre
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 24
elligerent right, and does not exist in time of peace. By the treaty of 1841, known as the Quintuple Treaty, between Great Britain, Austria, Prussia, and Russia, the slave-trade was declared piracy, and a mutual right of search given. France, actiratify it. The slave-traders often hoisted the American flag in order to protect themselves from search and capture. Great Britain asserted the right to stop vessels flying the American colors under circumstances which justified a strong suspicion ed, however, for naval co-operation in the suppression of the slave-trade. The right of visit and inquiry claimed by Great Britain was afterwards practically waived. When, however, there came an earnest purpose on the part of our Government to supght to search and seize vessels suspected of being engaged in the traffic was mutually accorded by the treaty between Great Britain and the United States, April 2, 1862, negotiated by Lord Lyons and Mr. Seward. Wheaton's International Law (Dana's
Ticonderoga (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 24
ave a European air, presenting a great contrast to the wooden towns of New England. I am anxious that your last impressions of my country should be derived from that part which may give you, I think, the most pleasure. Let me plan a short journey for you, trusting that the smiling scenes through which I would have you pass may make you forget some of your Southern and Western life. From Montreal descend Lake Champlain,—observe the beautiful boats on this lake; pass by Crown Point and Ticonderoga, places famous in the French war and that of the Revolution; then cross Lake George, a lake of silver; from Lake George to Saratoga you will pass over the Flanders, the debatable ground in American history, fought over in two wars; see Saratoga and Ballston, then return to Burlington, on Lake Champlain, and from there wind through the Green Mountains; see Montpelier, in the lap of the mountains; cross the Connecticut River, pass through what is called the Gap in the White Mountains to Por
Trenton Falls (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 24
d. Pray remember me warmly to Kenyon and the Montagus. Tell Kenyon that I confess to owing him a letter, which I shall send very soon. July 15.—To-day, I close my long epistle. Hillard has gone with Cleveland on a horseback excursion to Trenton Falls. He is getting stronger. Hillard's is a beautiful mind. You will be struck on your return, if that ever takes place, by the grace and felicity of his conversation. From his lips there never fall slang, vulgarisms, or coarseness; but all h lap of the mountains; cross the Connecticut River, pass through what is called the Gap in the White Mountains to Portland, Me., and thence to Boston; then, on the Western Railroad, to Berkshire, in the western part of Massachusetts; again to Trenton Falls (you will not miss another sight of them); thence back to the North River; and, descending the river, stop at Catskill and at West Point. Is this not a good plot? Cannot you be present at the annual Commencement of Harvard University (our
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 24
of the Maine Legislature. They have already appointed commissioners—so has Massachusetts—to proceed to Washington with full powers to give their consent to a new coBoston; then, on the Western Railroad, to Berkshire, in the western part of Massachusetts; again to Trenton Falls (you will not miss another sight of them); thence bith regard to legislation or codification in America. The commissioners in Massachusetts are still engaged upon their work, and will make a report in the winter. Jsed to be-pure. He lashed with an iron flail the recent Whig Convention in Massachusetts, over which Abbott Lawrence presided, which nominated Clay for President. Vermont have adopted very pointed resolutions against slavery; and that of Massachusetts will probably do the same this winter. The South will feel the sting of thand given body to the feeling already existing on the subject of Slavery in Massachusetts. General Cass has arrived from Paris, and is fast becoming a powerful ca
Troy, N. Y. (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 24
ount of his political engagements at Washington. Come and hear him,—if you can bear to leave your seclusion, which we so much envy you. How is Oscar? We feel sad in dear Longfellow's absence,--facile princeps of American poets, friend of the warm hand and gushing heart. . . . I drove the Lyells out last evening. They sail for Europe in the packet of the 16th. I break off now to mount with Howe to ride with two maidens fair. Ever and ever yours, Charles Sumner. To Hillard, at Troy, N. Y., he wrote, July 15, 1842:— We parted at the foot of Wellington Hills. Sumner and Captain R. B. Forbes escorted Hillard, who was starting on a journey, as far as Belmont Forbes and I—our horses most restive in each other's company—called on Mr. Cushing. On my return to town that evening, I found the Lyells had arrived. The next night I drove them out. They were delighted to see, for the first time, fireflies. I caught several for them in my hat. Wednesday they went to Nahant t
Carmans River (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 24
in,—observe the beautiful boats on this lake; pass by Crown Point and Ticonderoga, places famous in the French war and that of the Revolution; then cross Lake George, a lake of silver; from Lake George to Saratoga you will pass over the Flanders, the debatable ground in American history, fought over in two wars; see Saratoga and Ballston, then return to Burlington, on Lake Champlain, and from there wind through the Green Mountains; see Montpelier, in the lap of the mountains; cross the Connecticut River, pass through what is called the Gap in the White Mountains to Portland, Me., and thence to Boston; then, on the Western Railroad, to Berkshire, in the western part of Massachusetts; again to Trenton Falls (you will not miss another sight of them); thence back to the North River; and, descending the river, stop at Catskill and at West Point. Is this not a good plot? Cannot you be present at the annual Commencement of Harvard University (our Cambridge), the last Wednesday in August?
Chicopee (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 24
kindly to Madame Mittermaier and to all your family. I shall not forget my pleasant days at Heidelberg, and the hospitality of your house. Believe me ever, my dear Mr. Mittermaier, Very sincerely yours, Charles Sumner. To Longfellow he wrote, Aug. 20, 1842:— I have been away on a short journey with my two sisters, Mary and Julia, and have enjoyed not a little their enjoyment of life and new scenes. Howe started in company. We went to Springfield; thence made an excursion to Chicopee; thence to Lenox and Stockbridge, where I left the girls to ramble about, while Howe and I started on a journey to New York, including Hell Gate, where we passed the chief of our time. The Three Graces were bland and lovely. From New York I hastened back to Lenox; thence to Lebanon, where I fell in with President Van Buren; thence to Saratoga, where I saw Miss Sedgwick, Mrs. C——, and Miss A——L——; thence to Catskill and the Falls, which I admired very much, West Point, New York, and
Paris, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 24
en hundred dollars. If the case had been pushed to a decree, I suppose Judge Story would have felt bound to order the poor creature into slavery; but the decree could not have been enforced. A mass of excited men would have torn the slave from his master. The Latimer case; Wilson's Rise and Fall of the Slave Power, Vol. L pp. 477-480. This incident has called forth and given body to the feeling already existing on the subject of Slavery in Massachusetts. General Cass has arrived from Paris, and is fast becoming a powerful candidate for the Presidency. I was sorry to hear from him that the Quintuple Treaty was beyond all resurrection, and that even Guizot gave it over now. On many accounts, I should like Cass for President over any other candidate. He is a person of good morals, of heart, and appreciating the amenities of life. It is difficult to know, with any minuteness, his opinions on political questions. He professes to be a Democrat, bred at the feet of Jefferson; and
Ballston (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 24
trusting that the smiling scenes through which I would have you pass may make you forget some of your Southern and Western life. From Montreal descend Lake Champlain,—observe the beautiful boats on this lake; pass by Crown Point and Ticonderoga, places famous in the French war and that of the Revolution; then cross Lake George, a lake of silver; from Lake George to Saratoga you will pass over the Flanders, the debatable ground in American history, fought over in two wars; see Saratoga and Ballston, then return to Burlington, on Lake Champlain, and from there wind through the Green Mountains; see Montpelier, in the lap of the mountains; cross the Connecticut River, pass through what is called the Gap in the White Mountains to Portland, Me., and thence to Boston; then, on the Western Railroad, to Berkshire, in the western part of Massachusetts; again to Trenton Falls (you will not miss another sight of them); thence back to the North River; and, descending the river, stop at Catskill a
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