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Waltham (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 31
self. He thought that no physician could be confident that there was any thing on my lungs; if there was any thing it was very slight, and said he should not have suspected it if some of my family were not afflicted with poor lungs. He said he was most pleasantly disappointed by the result of the examination, and that his anxiety was removed. So when you see me, invigorated by the breezes of Berkshire and the balmy breaths of Newport, expect to find me in my pristine strength, rejoicing in your return, looking with joy upon all the signs of your happiness. I am vexed that I have filled this letter with so much about myself. It is a perpetual ego. When I read your arrival in the newspaper, I shall send you a note of my health and whereabouts. Perhaps then you will find time to cheer me with a letter. My sister Mary still lingers at Waltham, enjoying occasional drives, but fading gradually. Adieu, with my welcome to your wife and sisters. Ever affectionately thine, C. S.
Newport (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 31
The result of his examination has restored my confidence in myself. He thought that no physician could be confident that there was any thing on my lungs; if there was any thing it was very slight, and said he should not have suspected it if some of my family were not afflicted with poor lungs. He said he was most pleasantly disappointed by the result of the examination, and that his anxiety was removed. So when you see me, invigorated by the breezes of Berkshire and the balmy breaths of Newport, expect to find me in my pristine strength, rejoicing in your return, looking with joy upon all the signs of your happiness. I am vexed that I have filled this letter with so much about myself. It is a perpetual ego. When I read your arrival in the newspaper, I shall send you a note of my health and whereabouts. Perhaps then you will find time to cheer me with a letter. My sister Mary still lingers at Waltham, enjoying occasional drives, but fading gradually. Adieu, with my welcome
Berkshire (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 31
he might satisfy himself and you. The result of his examination has restored my confidence in myself. He thought that no physician could be confident that there was any thing on my lungs; if there was any thing it was very slight, and said he should not have suspected it if some of my family were not afflicted with poor lungs. He said he was most pleasantly disappointed by the result of the examination, and that his anxiety was removed. So when you see me, invigorated by the breezes of Berkshire and the balmy breaths of Newport, expect to find me in my pristine strength, rejoicing in your return, looking with joy upon all the signs of your happiness. I am vexed that I have filled this letter with so much about myself. It is a perpetual ego. When I read your arrival in the newspaper, I shall send you a note of my health and whereabouts. Perhaps then you will find time to cheer me with a letter. My sister Mary still lingers at Waltham, enjoying occasional drives, but fading
James Jackson (search for this): chapter 31
Wednesday forenoon, Aug. 28. Dr. Jackson has called this morning and given me some parting advice. After he had gone came the gentle Fisher, who desired to make an examination of me, that he might satisfy himself and you. The result of his examination has restored my confidence in myself. He thought that no physician could be confident that there was any thing on my lungs; if there was any thing it was very slight, and said he should not have suspected it if some of my family were not afflicted with poor lungs. He said he was most pleasantly disappointed by the result of the examination, and that his anxiety was removed. So when you see me, invigorated by the breezes of Berkshire and the balmy breaths of Newport, expect to find me in my pristine strength, rejoicing in your return, looking with joy upon all the signs of your happiness. I am vexed that I have filled this letter with so much about myself. It is a perpetual ego. When I read your arrival in the newspaper, I s
August 28th (search for this): chapter 31
Wednesday forenoon, Aug. 28. Dr. Jackson has called this morning and given me some parting advice. After he had gone came the gentle Fisher, who desired to make an examination of me, that he might satisfy himself and you. The result of his examination has restored my confidence in myself. He thought that no physician could be confident that there was any thing on my lungs; if there was any thing it was very slight, and said he should not have suspected it if some of my family were not afflicted with poor lungs. He said he was most pleasantly disappointed by the result of the examination, and that his anxiety was removed. So when you see me, invigorated by the breezes of Berkshire and the balmy breaths of Newport, expect to find me in my pristine strength, rejoicing in your return, looking with joy upon all the signs of your happiness. I am vexed that I have filled this letter with so much about myself. It is a perpetual ego. When I read your arrival in the newspaper, I s