hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity (current method)
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Hawthorne 65 1 Browse Search
Poe 56 0 Browse Search
Thoreau 48 0 Browse Search
Henry James 33 3 Browse Search
Lowell 24 0 Browse Search
Howells 23 11 Browse Search
Emerson 17 1 Browse Search
New England (United States) 10 0 Browse Search
Walden 10 0 Browse Search
Saxe Holm 10 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Short studies of American authors.

Found 383 total hits in 158 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
re-appears in Out of the question, in The lady of the Aroostook; it will re-appear while Mr. Howells lives. He is really contributing important studies to the future organization of our society. How is it to be stratified? How much weight is to be given to intellect, to character, to wealth, to antecedents, to inheritance? Not only must a republican nation meet and solve these problems, but the solution is more assisted by the writers of romances than by the compilers of statistics. Fourth of July orators cannot even state the problem : it almost baffles the finest touch. As, in England, you may read every thing ever written about the Established Church, and yet, after all, if you wish to know what a bishop or a curate is, you must go to Trollope's novels, so, to trace American society in its formative process, you must go to Howells; he alone shows you the essential forces in action. He can philosophize well enough on the subject, as where he points out that hereditary wealth
Preface. These brief papers were originally published in The literary world (Boston), and are here reprinted in a revised form, with some additions. Cambridge, Mass., Dec. i, 1879.
ers to distribute his emphasis, never a footnote for assistance. There was no conception so daring that he shrank from attempting it; and none that he could not so master as to state it, if he pleased, in terms of monosyllables. For all these merits he paid one high and inexorable penalty,--the utter absence of all immediate or dazzling success. His publisher, Goodrich, tells us, in his Reminiscences, Vol. II., p 269. that Hawthorne and Willis began to write together in The Token, in 1827, and that the now-forgotten Willis rose rapidly to fame, while Hawthorne's writings did not attract the slightest attention. The only recognition of his merits that I have been able to find in the contemporary criticism of those early years is in The New-England Magazine for October, 1834, where he is classed approvingly with those who were then considered the eminent writers of the day,--Miss Sedgwick, Miss Leslie, Verplanck, Greenwood, and John Neal. To them, the critic says, we may add a
October, 1834 AD (search for this): chapter 2
rose rapidly to fame, while Hawthorne's writings did not attract the slightest attention. The only recognition of his merits that I have been able to find in the contemporary criticism of those early years is in The New-England Magazine for October, 1834, where he is classed approvingly with those who were then considered the eminent writers of the day,--Miss Sedgwick, Miss Leslie, Verplanck, Greenwood, and John Neal. To them, the critic says, we may add an anonymous author of some of the most delicate and beautiful prose ever published this side of the Atlantic,--the author of The Gentle Boy. New-England Magazine, October, 1834, p. 331. For twenty years he continued to be, according to his own statement, the obscurest man of letters in America. Goodrich testifies that it was almost impossible to find a publisher for Twice-told tales in 1837, and I can myself remember how limited a circle greeted the reprint in the enlarged edition of 1841. When Poe, about 1846, wrote patroni
-Miss Sedgwick, Miss Leslie, Verplanck, Greenwood, and John Neal. To them, the critic says, we may add an anonymous author of some of the most delicate and beautiful prose ever published this side of the Atlantic,--the author of The Gentle Boy. New-England Magazine, October, 1834, p. 331. For twenty years he continued to be, according to his own statement, the obscurest man of letters in America. Goodrich testifies that it was almost impossible to find a publisher for Twice-told tales in 1837, and I can myself remember how limited a circle greeted the reprint in the enlarged edition of 1841. When Poe, about 1846, wrote patronizingly of Hawthorne, he added, It was never the fashion, until lately, to speak of him in any summary of our best authors. Poe's Works (ed. 1853), III. 189. Whittier once told me that when he himself had obtained, with some difficulty, in 1847, the insertion of one of Hawthorne's sketches in The National Era, the latter said quietly, There is not much m
dd an anonymous author of some of the most delicate and beautiful prose ever published this side of the Atlantic,--the author of The Gentle Boy. New-England Magazine, October, 1834, p. 331. For twenty years he continued to be, according to his own statement, the obscurest man of letters in America. Goodrich testifies that it was almost impossible to find a publisher for Twice-told tales in 1837, and I can myself remember how limited a circle greeted the reprint in the enlarged edition of 1841. When Poe, about 1846, wrote patronizingly of Hawthorne, he added, It was never the fashion, until lately, to speak of him in any summary of our best authors. Poe's Works (ed. 1853), III. 189. Whittier once told me that when he himself had obtained, with some difficulty, in 1847, the insertion of one of Hawthorne's sketches in The National Era, the latter said quietly, There is not much market for my wares. It has always seemed to me the greatest triumph of his genius, not that he bor
Poe. It happens to us rarely in our lives to come consciously into the presence of that extraordinary miracle we call genius. Among the many literary persons whom I have happened to meet, at home or abroad, there are not half a dozen who have left an irresistible sense of this rare quality; and, among these few, Poe stands next to Hawthorne in the vividness of personal impression he produced. I saw him but once; and it was on that celebrated occasion, in 1845, when he startled Boston by substituting his boyish production, Al Aaraaf, for the more serious poem which he was to have delivered before the Lyceum. There was much curiosity to see him; for his prose-writings had been eagerly read, at least among college-students, and his poems were just beginning to excite still greater attention. After a rather solid and very partisan address by Caleb Cushing, then just returned from his Chinese embassy, the poet was introduced. I distinctly recall his face, with its ample forehead
of some of the most delicate and beautiful prose ever published this side of the Atlantic,--the author of The Gentle Boy. New-England Magazine, October, 1834, p. 331. For twenty years he continued to be, according to his own statement, the obscurest man of letters in America. Goodrich testifies that it was almost impossible to find a publisher for Twice-told tales in 1837, and I can myself remember how limited a circle greeted the reprint in the enlarged edition of 1841. When Poe, about 1846, wrote patronizingly of Hawthorne, he added, It was never the fashion, until lately, to speak of him in any summary of our best authors. Poe's Works (ed. 1853), III. 189. Whittier once told me that when he himself had obtained, with some difficulty, in 1847, the insertion of one of Hawthorne's sketches in The National Era, the latter said quietly, There is not much market for my wares. It has always seemed to me the greatest triumph of his genius, not that he bore poverty without a mur
same with that of his critics. For a permanent residence it seemed to me that there could be no comparison between this [Concord] and the wilderness, necessary as the latter is for a resource and a background, the raw material of all our civilization. The wilderness is simple almost to barrenness. The partially cultivated country it is which chiefly has inspired, and will continue to inspire, the strains of poets such as compose the mass of any literature. Maine Woods, p. 159; written in 1846. Seen in the light of such eminently sensible remarks as these, it will by and by be discovered that Thoreau's whole attitude has been needlessly distorted. Lowell says that his shanty-life was mere impossibility, so far as his own conception of it goes, as an entire independency of mankind. The tub of Diogenes had a sounder bottom. My Study Windows, p. 208. But what a man of straw is this that Lowell is constructing! What is this shanty-life ? A young man living in a country villag
tters in America. Goodrich testifies that it was almost impossible to find a publisher for Twice-told tales in 1837, and I can myself remember how limited a circle greeted the reprint in the enlarged edition of 1841. When Poe, about 1846, wrote patronizingly of Hawthorne, he added, It was never the fashion, until lately, to speak of him in any summary of our best authors. Poe's Works (ed. 1853), III. 189. Whittier once told me that when he himself had obtained, with some difficulty, in 1847, the insertion of one of Hawthorne's sketches in The National Era, the latter said quietly, There is not much market for my wares. It has always seemed to me the greatest triumph of his genius, not that he bore poverty without a murmur, -for what right has a literary man, who can command his time and his art, to sigh after the added enjoyments of mere wealth?-but that he went on doing work of such a quality for an audience so small or so indifferent. Whether more immediate applause would
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...