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Paris, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
letters as soon as received were read to the President and his advisers, and were most useful in guiding their action. To these three correspondents he wrote often and most earnestly,—maintaining, spite of slowness and shortcomings, the moral grandeur of our cause, and protesting against the unfriendly, or, at least, unsympathetic action of the British government. To other Englishmen he wrote at intervals with appeals of like tenor; and he also conducted a correspondence with the Count of Paris after his return from this country to France. Sumner's intimate communication with foreigners, at a time when foreign opinion and action were so important to us, is not among the least of his services to his country during our civil contest. He kept an eye from the beginning of the Civil War on foreign opinion, and pleaded that the secret service fund should be used to instruct foreign journals. He was likewise in communication with a large proportion of the legations and consulates of t
New York (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
he spoke forcibly against a final adjournment until the public business was completed, pointing out that Congress was by several weeks short of the limit which it was accustomed to reach when members were paid by the day instead of by the year. July 12 (Works, vol. VII. pp. 176-179). He had made similar remarks May 22 (Congressional Globe, p. 2225). The New York Evening Post, June 7, 1862, had an article of the same tenor. In declining an invitation to attend a public meeting in the city of New York, he said, A senator cannot leave his place more than a soldier. July 14, 1862. Works, vol. VII. pp. 180, 181. It has often occurred in the Senate,—and it occurred many times during this session, in which the duties of patriotism were most exacting,—that it was obliged to adjourn for want of a quorum, or for want of the attendance of a sufficient number to make its action decisive. Sumner's vacant chair, while he was in health, was never an obstruction to public business. Agai
Saint Petersburg (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
tween Governor Andrew and the government. The files of the governor's office at the State House contain many letters from Sumner on public business. Literary men as well as antislavery men, irrespective of the States they lived in, felt they had a special claim on Sumner. Motley was urgent with him for a mission, first at the Hague and then at Vienna. Fay hoped, though vainly, to be saved by him from the competition of place-seekers. Bayard Taylor, wishing to succeed Cameron at St. Petersburg, wrote from that capital, Aug. 18, 1862: Take my importunity in good part; there are so few senators who are scholars! It was a time when relatives were always at Washington on their way to look for wounded or sick soldiers, or to recover their bodies from fields and hospitals. Sumner, however much it might invade his time, was always glad to serve them by procuring passes or otherwise. When any of his friends met with bereavements, his habit was to send a letter of solace. The fil
Thurman (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
referred to Sumner's chronic difficult about adjournments. Similar pressure from Sumner, with similar resistance from other senators who recalled his uniform position on the suspension of business, will be found in the record of later sessions (June 25, 1864, Globe, p. 3263; July 2, 1864, Works, vol. IX. pp. 55-63; July 26, 1866, Globe, pp. 4166, 4167; Dec. 14, 1868, Globe, p. 68; Dec. 15, 1869; May 5, 6, and 20, 1870, Globe, pp. 137, 3239, 3274, 3277, 3658; Feb 15, 1871, Globe, p. 1262). Thurman's tribute, April 27, 1874 (Globe, p. 3400), referred to Sumner's high estimate of the effect of full discussion. His persistence in opposing a limitation of the session, even under the oppressive heat of the summer, brought him sometimes into collision with senators who, though not laggards, took a less exacting view of official duty, or who thought, sometimes quite rightly, that enough had already been done, and what remained would ripen for better action during the vacation. July 2, 1
Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
relatives were always at Washington on their way to look for wounded or sick soldiers, or to recover their bodies from fields and hospitals. Sumner, however much it might invade his time, was always glad to serve them by procuring passes or otherwise. When any of his friends met with bereavements, his habit was to send a letter of solace. The files of his correspondence contain many replies from those whose griefs he sought to assuage. The brother of Rev. Arthur B. Fuller, killed at Fredericksburg, whose widow's petition for a pension he promoted, wrote to him: As often as my brother's widow receives her pension for herself and little ones, she will think of the senator from Massachusetts. Sumner's admirers often named their children for him. His replies to them, when they announced this kind of recognition, were of uniform tenor, and one written in 1865 may be given as a specimen:— Don't make a mistake. Never name a child after a living man. This is the counsel I give a
France (France) (search for this): chapter 3
e President and his advisers, and were most useful in guiding their action. To these three correspondents he wrote often and most earnestly,—maintaining, spite of slowness and shortcomings, the moral grandeur of our cause, and protesting against the unfriendly, or, at least, unsympathetic action of the British government. To other Englishmen he wrote at intervals with appeals of like tenor; and he also conducted a correspondence with the Count of Paris after his return from this country to France. Sumner's intimate communication with foreigners, at a time when foreign opinion and action were so important to us, is not among the least of his services to his country during our civil contest. He kept an eye from the beginning of the Civil War on foreign opinion, and pleaded that the secret service fund should be used to instruct foreign journals. He was likewise in communication with a large proportion of the legations and consulates of the United States, from which came statements
Northampton (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
of the senator, and he came to be his cordial and confidential friend, so remaining to the end. He dispensed a liberal hospitality; and in his house at Washington, as well as at Boston and on the seashore, Sumner was always welcome to lodge or dine. The intimacy which he had enjoyed with the family of Mr. Adams, already Minister to England, was now transferred to Mr. Hooper's, at whose house he dined at least once or twice a week from 1861 to 1874. Later in these pages it will become necessary to refer to a near connection between the two friends. Two or three incidents in family and friendship may be noted here,—the death in March, 1862, of another of the Five of Clubs (Felton, of whose funeral Mr. Thies sent an account); the disability of George Sumner, stricken with paralysis, and after medical treatment in Northampton coming back to the old home in Hancock Street; a cordial letter from Agassiz in the autumn urging attendance at the dinners of the Saturday Club at Parker's
Warrington, Fla. (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
hat honor, either in the Senate or House of Representatives, it has not been my good fortune to know one who has been as prompt and kindly attentive to the applications of his constituents as yourself. One great secret of his power, as was remarked by a shrewd critic of public men, was his intense personality, his great and overmastering qualities, which brought him at times into collision with other senators, but which nevertheless made him one of the powers and estates of the country. Warrington's (W. S. Robinson) Pen Portraits, pp. 517-520. This writer said: It would be difficult to name a man,—and this is the universal testimony of those who have been to Washington on business, and have asked Mr. Sumner's aid,—it would be difficult, if not impossible, to find a man so industrious, methodical, thorough, energetic, and successful in attending to pure matters of business. This is the simple fact, and no exaggeration whatever. His great practical talent excels that of almost every
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
17. 1869 (Globe, p. 726), I never knew the day to come when my friend from Massachusetts really thought the Senate ought to adjourn; and three days later (Globe, ppheld some important executive or administrative office,—that of governor of Massachusetts, or a member of the Cabinet at Washington, for example,—that he might have stimony in writing, that of all the gentlemen who have formerly represented Massachusetts, or who now have that honor, either in the Senate or House of Representativchess of Argyll; a dozen or twenty faithful friends who wrote of affairs in Massachusetts; old Abolitionists in all parts of the country, well known or obscure,—inder house. Among the visitors were writers for public journals, friends from Massachusetts, politicians from all parts of the country, survivors of the old antislaverher pension for herself and little ones, she will think of the senator from Massachusetts. Sumner's admirers often named their children for him. His replies to th<
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 3
zeal and fidelity the dignity, privileges, and authority of the Senate. E. R. Hoar. Edward Dicey, who visited the United States at this period, described the senator as that great, sturdy, English-looking figure, with the broad, massive forehead of its justice and fitness. See National Republican, Feb. 18, 1872. What Bright did for England Sumner did for the United States,—each insisting always on the supremacy of the moral sentiments in government and the intercourse of nations, and eacal statutes removing the disability of colored citizens were his handiwork. The consolidation of the statutes of the United States was his first thought, and was finally effected by his constant pressure. Some critics, remembering that Sumner stuct foreign journals. He was likewise in communication with a large proportion of the legations and consulates of the United States, from which came statements of their needs and the aspect of our Civil War as it was regarded at their posts, and adv
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