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p. 459, 460.) The vessel went to the bottom in Hampton Roads shortly after in a collision. Our government disavowed the acts of the American officers in making the seizure. During the war several of Sumner's friends, whom he had long cherished, were severed from him by death. Mr. Giddings died at Montreal, May 27, 1864, where he was serving as consulgeneral. He kept up a correspondence with Sumner on affairs in this country and our relations with Canada. He had visited Washington in January, when he and Sumner met for the last time. His last letter, written April 9, when a readjustment of reciprocity with Canada was contemplated, contained a postscript, which revealed his premonitions that the end was near, saying: Should I live, I desire to be one of the commissioners to negotiate the new treaty. The bar of Ashtabula County, Ohio, of which he was a member, invited Sumner to deliver a eulogy upon him, and his son-in-law, George W. Julian, urged an acceptance; but Sumner was
in the session resolutions for such an amendment were proposed by Ashley of Ohio and Wilson of Iowa in the House, and by Henderson of Missouri in the Senate. Sumner himself offered two forms. He moved a reference of the subject to his own committee on slavery and freedmen, but yielded to Trumbull's suggestion that it belonged more properly to the committee on the judiciary, expressing as his chief desire that prompt action should be taken. Trumbull, adopting the formula of the Ordinance of 1787, reported as the proposed amendment that neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime, whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction. Sumner preferred a scientific to a traditional form, and thought the one reported to imply a sanction of slavery as a punishment of crime,—a penalty deemed humane at the time of the Ordinance, but now discarded. The proposed sale of negro conv
March 17th (search for this): chapter 6
uld have been thought a good session's work for most public men. It fills nearly one hundred and fifty pages of the report, and one hundred pages of Sumner's Works. It was, however, an investigation very congenial to Sumner. He wrote Lieber, March 17: I go home to work at my report on French spoliations. I am struck by the scrubs of the French Directory; but especially by the magnificent ability of Talleyrand, whose reply to our commissioners is a masterpiece. He was then only a beginner.an appropriation for the training of pupils for the consular service; March 15, 1864. Works, vol. VIII. pp. 223-227. the raising of the mission to Belgium to a first-class rank; March 15. Works, vol. VIII. pp. 217-222. He wrote Lieber, March 17: I was badgered on all sides, but at last on ayes and noes carried it. national academies for the promotion of literature, art, and of the moral and political sciences,—a project in relation to which Lieber, Agassiz, and R. W. Emerson were his c
October 28th (search for this): chapter 6
nd, candid, considerate, and full of true friendship. A large circle will deplore his loss; and I pray you not to forget that it embraces many on this side of the ocean. But I wish to speak especially of myself; I shall always remember with pleasure and gratitude the relations it was my privilege to enjoy with him, and shall think of his loss with sorrow. Please to accept for Miss Senior Afterwards Mrs. Simpson. also my compliments and sympathies. To Mr. and Mrs. Francis G. Shaw, October 28:— Again you are called to feel the calamity of this war. I sorrow with you most sincerely. There are very few persons of whom I have seen so little who interested me so much as Colonel Lowell. Charles R. Lowell, killed Oct. 20, 1864, in battle in Virginia. He was beautiful in character as in countenance. He is another sacrifice to slavery. When at last our triumph is won, his name must be inscribed on that martyr list, without which slavery would have been supreme on the contin
March 15th (search for this): chapter 6
in any positive way—each perhaps in a different form—express an interest in the idea, and that will have a great effect on the country and on Congress too. This is a moment for changes. Our whole system is like molten wax, ready to receive an impression. Other subjects on which Sumner spoke briefly were an appropriation for the training of pupils for the consular service; March 15, 1864. Works, vol. VIII. pp. 223-227. the raising of the mission to Belgium to a first-class rank; March 15. Works, vol. VIII. pp. 217-222. He wrote Lieber, March 17: I was badgered on all sides, but at last on ayes and noes carried it. national academies for the promotion of literature, art, and of the moral and political sciences,—a project in relation to which Lieber, Agassiz, and R. W. Emerson were his correspondents, July 2. Works, vol. IX. pp. 51-54. all of whom entered heartily into it; the prohibition of sales of gold deliverable at a future day; April 15. Congressional Globe, <
October 25th (search for this): chapter 6
n earlier address, September 18, 1860. Works, vol. v. pp, 276-279. with an exposure of the pretension that Virginia was ennobled in her origin by cavalier colonists. He spoke in certain towns in Massachusetts, and also in Hartford and New London, Conn., where Mr. Winthrop made an address for McClellan, and in Newark, N. J.; but he declined calls from other States. The spirit and tone of his speeches in the autumn are indicated in these extracts from his letters to F. W. Ballard:— October 25: If I speak, it will be to put the cause of liberty for our country and all mankind in a new light, so that the pettifoggers and compromisers shall be silenced. November 2:I had last night [at New London] the largest audience known here of voters—ladies excluded to make room. My aim is to exhibit the grandeur and dignity of our cause, and to lift people to their duties. November 9: I am indignant at the possible loss of New York State. It is because of the craven politics there, wh
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