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Montreal (Canada) (search for this): chapter 6
ected to his use of England's old doings as an excuse for your present shortcomings; and thought the vessel should have been promptly returned to Brazil. (Morley's Life of Cobden, vol. II. pp. 459, 460.) The vessel went to the bottom in Hampton Roads shortly after in a collision. Our government disavowed the acts of the American officers in making the seizure. During the war several of Sumner's friends, whom he had long cherished, were severed from him by death. Mr. Giddings died at Montreal, May 27, 1864, where he was serving as consulgeneral. He kept up a correspondence with Sumner on affairs in this country and our relations with Canada. He had visited Washington in January, when he and Sumner met for the last time. His last letter, written April 9, when a readjustment of reciprocity with Canada was contemplated, contained a postscript, which revealed his premonitions that the end was near, saying: Should I live, I desire to be one of the commissioners to negotiate the ne
Hawarden (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 6
d not write so if I had less confidence in your sincerity and goodness. I have been pained to learn that the Duchess of Sutherland, whose kindness to me enabled me to see you whom I already honored much, is still ailing. I hope that her generous nature may be spared yet longer to soften and quicken our social life. I am sure that she will rejoice when slavery, now in arms, is cast down, never to rise again. I think she would be glad to help at this overthrow. The date of your letter (Hawarden) reminds me of a pleasant day which I can never forget. To W. W. Story, Rome, January 1:— A happy New Year to you and yours! I think of you constantly, and always with affection, and vow letters. But my life is so crowded that I have found myself dropping correspondence that did not come under the head, if not of business, at least of public interest. The Psyche A copy of the antique, for which Sumner had given Story a commission. is superb, and I enjoy it much. You know the
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
1864, a special committee on slavery and freedmen, and became its chairman. His Republican associates were Howard of Michigan, Pomeroy of Kansas, Gratz Brown of Missouri, and Conness of California. He introduced a bill to repeal all fugitive—slave acts, which was referred to the committee; and its first report was a bill for thept, May 17, 1866. Early in the session resolutions for such an amendment were proposed by Ashley of Ohio and Wilson of Iowa in the House, and by Henderson of Missouri in the Senate. Sumner himself offered two forms. He moved a reference of the subject to his own committee on slavery and freedmen, but yielded to Trumbull's su Lincoln was nominated in June, 1864, for re-election, at the Republican national convention in Baltimore, without open opposition except from the delegates from Missouri. There were times during the war when there was a lack of enthusiasm for Mr. Lincoln, and a distrust of his fitness for his place among public men who were asso
Denmark (Denmark) (search for this): chapter 6
n separation, and that France was ready at any time to offer her good offices to bring about peace. When he said this I snapped my fingers. But does not this explain the precise policy of the emperor? To Lieber, December 28:— Your German sky lowers with war. Can it be avoided? My letters assure me that Germany at last is a unit, and that it will stand by Schleswig-Holstein. Schleiden, who is very intelligent, is openly for war. He says that the connection of the provinces with Denmark must be cut. This is war. Motley writes from Vienna that in his opinion war is inevitable. Mercier leaves Washington to-day. Inter nos, he will tell the emperor that the Mexican expedition is a mistake, and that he ought to withdraw it; but that the national cause here is hopeless, and that the war will end in separation! This I have from his own lips. To W. E. Gladstone, Jan. 1, 1864:— I begin the year with my acknowledgments of the kindness of your letter, and with my best wi
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
by his letter cited by them of date Sept. 1, 1864, and printed in the New York Sun, June 30, 1889, which is of similar tenor as his letter to Lieber, September 3. This was also the position of Senator Collamer and John Jay. With Sumner, as with Bryant and Greeley and all other patriotic men, the question was settled by the Chicago treason. The fear of an adverse decision of the people in November, felt by Mr. Lincoln himself as well as by others, vanished with the victories of our army in Georgia, which culminated in the evacuation of Atlanta by the rebels on the night of the day of McClellan's nomination. Mr. Lincoln carried the electoral vote of all the States except three,—Delaware, Kentucky, and New Jersey; but McClellan's vote was very large in some States, as New York, Pennsylvania, and Ohio. It is curious to observe how in a few months, when death had set its seal on a great character, Mr. Lincoln's honest critics became his sincere eulogists,—notably Bryant, Greeley, Bancr
Chicago (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
himself faced defeat as altogether probable. Nicolay and Hay's Life of Lincoln, vol. IX. pp. 249-251. The disaffection which then seemed so serious disappeared, however, immediately after the Democratic nomination of McClellan, August 31, at Chicago, upon a platform which declared the war to be four years of failure, and called for a cessation of hostilities. Sumner shared in the opinion of Mr. Lincoln's limitations, which was common with public men in 1863-1864; but he took no part in tvent the election of McClellan; to my mind the election is already decided. . . Chase for a long time hesitated in the support of Mr. Lincoln; he did not think him competent. But he finds that he has no alternative; as a patriot, he must oppose Chicago. The President made a great mistake in compelling him to resign. It was very much as when Louis XVI. threw overboard Necker,—and, by the way, I have often observed that Mr. Lincoln resembles Louis XVI. more than any other ruler in history.
Michigan (Michigan, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
o public life, and which he had made ineffectual efforts to have repealed ever since he entered the Senate. He moved, Jan. 13, 1864, a special committee on slavery and freedmen, and became its chairman. His Republican associates were Howard of Michigan, Pomeroy of Kansas, Gratz Brown of Missouri, and Conness of California. He introduced a bill to repeal all fugitive—slave acts, which was referred to the committee; and its first report was a bill for the repeal, accompanied by an elaborate aral banks from local taxation and interference was essential to the working of the new system and to the support of the public credit at a critical period. His amendment It was drawn by Mr. Chase. was lost; but he was supported by Chandler of Michigan, Conness, Howard, Lane of Indiana, Pomeroy, Ramsey, Sherman, Sprague, Wilkinson, and Wilson. Sumner received unstinted praise from Chandler, a banker by profession, who testified in debate to the debt of gratitude which the country owed to the
New York State (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
e extracts from his letters to F. W. Ballard:— October 25: If I speak, it will be to put the cause of liberty for our country and all mankind in a new light, so that the pettifoggers and compromisers shall be silenced. November 2:I had last night [at New London] the largest audience known here of voters—ladies excluded to make room. My aim is to exhibit the grandeur and dignity of our cause, and to lift people to their duties. November 9: I am indignant at the possible loss of New York State. It is because of the craven politics there, where intriguers and compromisers bear sway. November 17, from Philadelphia: The indications of an early organization of a Native American party to neutralize the Irish Roman Catholic vote are strong here; they voted against us almost to a man. At Burlington, N. J., the priest stood all day at the polls to see that his people voted for McClellan. Sumner contributed two articles to a Boston journal on the seizure of the Florida, a Confe
Atlanta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
question was settled by the Chicago treason. The fear of an adverse decision of the people in November, felt by Mr. Lincoln himself as well as by others, vanished with the victories of our army in Georgia, which culminated in the evacuation of Atlanta by the rebels on the night of the day of McClellan's nomination. Mr. Lincoln carried the electoral vote of all the States except three,—Delaware, Kentucky, and New Jersey; but McClellan's vote was very large in some States, as New York, Pennsylf the great result. This struggle can have but one end. You must observe how we have constantly gained. The lines of the enemy have been drawn in, and their strong places have been taken; and this will continue to the end. . . . The capture of Atlanta is surely a great point in the war. I have had great confidence in Sherman; he is a consummate soldier, and I think military critics must confess that his campaign shows no ordinary ability. I agree with you in turning away from this bloodshed,
Jamestown, N. Y. (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
X. pp. 134-136. He put forward on these occasions, as patriotic aims, the complete suppression of the rebellion and the complete extinction of slavery. Never, said he, was grander cause or sublimer conflict; never holier sacrifice. At Cooper Institute he was received with the same enthusiasm that had hitherto characterized his New York audiences. One incident of this address was a contrast between the mission of the Mayflower bound for Plymouth and that of the first slave-ship bound for Jamestown, This contrast appears in an earlier address, September 18, 1860. Works, vol. v. pp, 276-279. with an exposure of the pretension that Virginia was ennobled in her origin by cavalier colonists. He spoke in certain towns in Massachusetts, and also in Hartford and New London, Conn., where Mr. Winthrop made an address for McClellan, and in Newark, N. J.; but he declined calls from other States. The spirit and tone of his speeches in the autumn are indicated in these extracts from his
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