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Abraham Lincoln (search for this): chapter 6
ster, and Sherman withheld their votes. President Lincoln signed the bill on the 28th. Full notn, and was one of the last acts approved by Mr. Lincoln. General O. O. Howard was appointed commiss for reconstruction. In Louisiana, under Mr. Lincoln's direction. The sentiment in Louisiana amoe Arguelles case Nicolay and Hay's Life of Lincoln, vol. IX. pp. 44-47. and a joint resolution e country to consult upon the nomination of Mr. Lincoln's successor, in which Mr. Chase appeared toty rather than Mr. Lincoln. Greeley thought Mr. Lincoln already beaten, and that another ticket washange of candidate desirable, but only with Mr. Lincoln's free and voluntary withdrawal; and he cou house in Boston, some parts of his eulogy on Lincoln as he was preparing it. When reminded that heent in a different tone, he answered: Well, Mr. Lincoln was indeed the author of a new order of Staead the platform, they ranged in support of Mr. Lincoln. I declined to take any part in the meetin[32 more...]
r review, he carried the same amendment to two charters, succeeding after spirited contests by a small majority in each case,—defeated at one stage and prevailing at a later one. Feb. 10, 25, March 16, 17, June 21, 1864; Works, vol. VIII. pp. 103-117. The amendment was rejected, June 21, by fourteen to sixteen,—Foster, Grimes, Sherman, and Trumbull voting nay; but moved again by Sumner on the same day, it passed by a vote of seventeen to sixteen. The opposition of Saulsbury, Powell, and Willey abounded in ribaldry. Republican senators—Trumbull, Sherman, Doolittle, and Grimes, as well as Reverdy Johnson—contended that an express prohibition was superfluous, as the exclusion was already forbidden by the common law; but this contention overlooked the opposite practice and judicial view prevailing in the slave and also in some of the free States. Sherman objected on the ground of the embarrassment to which the proprietors of the railway would be subjected. Sumner reminded Trumbull
O. O. Howard (search for this): chapter 6
ved, Jan. 13, 1864, a special committee on slavery and freedmen, and became its chairman. His Republican associates were Howard of Michigan, Pomeroy of Kansas, Gratz Brown of Missouri, and Conness of California. He introduced a bill to repeal all fs scope. In this form it passed without debate or division, and was one of the last acts approved by Mr. Lincoln. General O. O. Howard was appointed commissioner. The bureau became a distinctive part of Republican policy, and a year later it was foywhere within the United States. Trumbull could not see why Sumner should be so pertinacious about particular words, and Howard objected to the latter's formula as more French than American. Sumner, on appeal from Trumbull, withdrew his propositioncal period. His amendment It was drawn by Mr. Chase. was lost; but he was supported by Chandler of Michigan, Conness, Howard, Lane of Indiana, Pomeroy, Ramsey, Sherman, Sprague, Wilkinson, and Wilson. Sumner received unstinted praise from Chandl
Richard H. Dana (search for this): chapter 6
made up by reinforcements. Mr. Lincoln was nominated in June, 1864, for re-election, at the Republican national convention in Baltimore, without open opposition except from the delegates from Missouri. There were times during the war when there was a lack of enthusiasm for Mr. Lincoln, and a distrust of his fitness for his place among public men who were associated with him. Visitors to Washington in 1863-1864 were struck with the want of personal loyalty to him. Adams's Biography of Dana, vol. II. pp. 264, 265, 271, 274; Godwin's Life of W. C. Bryant, vol. II. pp. 175, 178; P. W. Chandler's Memoir of John A. Andrew, pp. 111-114; Letter from Washington in Boston Commonwealth, Nov. 12, 1864. They found few senators and representatives who would maintain cordially and positively that he combined the qualifications of a leader in the great crisis; and the larger number of them, as the national election approached, were dissatisfied with his candidacy. Greeley's American Conf
William Lloyd Garrison (search for this): chapter 6
preserving the rights of the Southern States,— prevailed, April 19, by a vote of twenty-four to seventeen, several Republicans voting affirmatively. Sumner's deep regret at this result is expressed in his letter, April 23, 1864, printed in W. L. Garrison's Life, vol. IV. p. 118. Sumner still wished the bill carried, notwithstanding its exclusion of the Act of 1793 from repeal; but Brown and Conness of his committee refused to support it after the amendment had passed, and it was laid aside. action on the main proposition,—the constitutional amendment to abolish slavery,— the main proposition is to strike slavery wherever you can hit it. Jan. 5, 1865. Works, vol. IX. pp. 193-197. The bill became a law March 3, 1865. William Lloyd Garrison wrote to Sumner from Boston, June 26, 1864:— My sojourn in Washington was much to see you and some others to the extent I desired; but I wish to express to you my thanks for your very kind attentions, and the great pleasure I felt
Amos A. Lawrence (search for this): chapter 6
o be four years of failure, and called for a cessation of hostilities. Sumner shared in the opinion of Mr. Lincoln's limitations, which was common with public men in 1863-1864; but he took no part in the plans for putting another candidate in his stead. In correspondence he referred to the subject but slightly and incidentally, and was reserved in conversation at Washington, though less so in Boston, where he spoke more freely to personal friends of Mr. Lincoln's defects. Life of Amos A. Lawrence, p. 195. He thought a change of candidate desirable, but only with Mr. Lincoln's free and voluntary withdrawal; and he counselled against any action which might be construed as hostile to him. Nicolay and Hay (Life of Lincoln, vol. IX. p. 367) are incorrect in saying that the New York movement had the earnest support and eager instigation of Charles Sumner. Their statement is not supported by his letter cited by them of date Sept. 1, 1864, and printed in the New York Sun, June 30,
John E. Lodge (search for this): chapter 6
e were annoyed by the publication. Lord Airlie and his brother-in-law, E. Lyulph Stanley, who visited this country the same season, brought letters to Sumner from the Duchess of Argyll. He attended the Saturday Club dinners, at one of which as a guest was Chase, just resigned from the Cabinet, and on his way to the White Mountains. William Curtis Noyes was another guest. He dined with J. B. Smith when the latter entertained Auguste Laugel; he dined often at Mr. Hooper's, took tea at Mrs. J. E. Lodge's, and passed an evening at James T. Fields's. He began sittings with Milmore for his bust, which was finished late in the next year. In the autumn, as before, his visits to Longfellow at Cambridge were frequent. Robert Ferguson, an Englishman, in his book, America during and after the War (p. 32), quoted in Longfellow's Life (vol. II. pp. 414, 415), wrote his recollections of Craigie House: Sumner, with the poet's little daughter nestling in his lap,—for he is a man to whom all ch
George W. Julian (search for this): chapter 6
leader in the great crisis; and the larger number of them, as the national election approached, were dissatisfied with his candidacy. Greeley's American Conflict, vol. II. p. 655; Wilson's Rise and Fall of the Slave Power, vol. III. p. 545; Julian's Political Recollections, p. 243; New York Tribune, July 2, 1889. An indifference towards him was noted in the commercial centres and among the most intelligent of the loyal people. Lieber to General Halleck, Sept. 1, 1864, in Lieber's Life hat the end was near, saying: Should I live, I desire to be one of the commissioners to negotiate the new treaty. The bar of Ashtabula County, Ohio, of which he was a member, invited Sumner to deliver a eulogy upon him, and his son-in-law, George W. Julian, urged an acceptance; but Sumner was obliged to decline. Sumner paid, March 29, 1864, an affectionate tribute to Owen Lovejoy, a member of the House, from whom he had always received most cordial sympathy in his radical action against sla
Naturally B. F. Wade (search for this): chapter 6
date, for a postponement of the Republican convention, which was advocated in the New York Evening Post Both Mr. Greeley and Mr. Bryant joined with a committee to request the Republican national committee to postpone the convention. Nicolay and Hay's Life of Lincoln, vol. IX. pp. 57, 58. and the New York Independent. June 2. The same paper, June 16, gives its support to the nomination, but without enthusiasm. The effort for another nomination did not end with the convention. Naturally B. F. Wade, senator, and Henry Winter Davis, representative, were earnest in it; but a large number of public men were in sympathy with them. Senator Grimes held their view of Mr. Lincoln's limitations. Gurowski's diary, vol. III. p. 358, where an extract from his letter is given. This is corroborated by his letter written after Mr. Lincoln's death. J. W. Grimes's Life, p. 279. Governor Andrew of Massachusetts, foremost among war governors, who had occasion to seek Mr. Lincoln from time t
Robert Ferguson (search for this): chapter 6
f which as a guest was Chase, just resigned from the Cabinet, and on his way to the White Mountains. William Curtis Noyes was another guest. He dined with J. B. Smith when the latter entertained Auguste Laugel; he dined often at Mr. Hooper's, took tea at Mrs. J. E. Lodge's, and passed an evening at James T. Fields's. He began sittings with Milmore for his bust, which was finished late in the next year. In the autumn, as before, his visits to Longfellow at Cambridge were frequent. Robert Ferguson, an Englishman, in his book, America during and after the War (p. 32), quoted in Longfellow's Life (vol. II. pp. 414, 415), wrote his recollections of Craigie House: Sumner, with the poet's little daughter nestling in his lap,—for he is a man to whom all children come,—calmly discussing some question of European literature, seeming to feel deeply the defection of certain of the old antislavery leaders of England from the Northern cause in the great crisis of the struggle. Sumner wr
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