hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity (current method)
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) 492 0 Browse Search
B. F. Butler 91 3 Browse Search
William Schouler 66 0 Browse Search
Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) 54 0 Browse Search
F. A. Walker 51 7 Browse Search
Charles Devens 50 4 Browse Search
Joseph Hooker 50 2 Browse Search
P. H. Sheridan 49 1 Browse Search
N. P. Banks 49 1 Browse Search
Irwin 44 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1: prelminary narrative. Search the whole document.

Found 5,213 total hits in 1,648 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
y General Revere, his brigade commander, as a truly splendid officer and magnificently brave. See his memoir in Harvard Memorial Biographies, I, 147. On the first day of the battle of Chancellorsville there took place a cavalry skirmish at Rapidan Station, Va. (May 1, 1863), when the only life lost was that of Lieut. A. E. P that the officers and men showed the greatest coolness and courage. Official War Records, 43, p. 698. In other parts of the line the heaviest losses fell on the 1st, 11th, 15th, 16th, 19th, 20th and 28th. In the afternoon, when two regiments (the 15th Mass., Col. G. H. Ward, and the 82d New York, Col. Huston) were sent forward (1 battalion), again met the enemy, with much heavier losses than at Swift Creek, the losses falling on the 23d, 24th, 25th, 27th and 40th Mass. Infantry. On the first day a portion of the enemy's line of defence was carried with small loss; on the 16th Butler was forced back to his entrenchments, the Confederates entrenching str
e in the second division of the First Corps, under Maj.-Gen. J. F. Reynolds, though temporarily commanded by Maj.-Gen. Abner Doubleday. The First Corps was, on this first day, in the words of its commander, broken and defeated but not discouraged, and was a mere advance guard of the army. The men captured were largely taken in the effort to reach General Steinwehr's division on Cemetery Hill, which was their rallying point. Doubleday's Chancellorsville and Gettysburg, p. 150. On the second day of Gettysburg (July 2), Massachusetts regiments were with General Sickles in his firm resistance to the Confederate attack; these being the 18th and 22d and the 5th and 9th batteries. Col. W. S. Tilton, commanding brigade, says that the officers and men showed the greatest coolness and courage. Official War Records, 43, p. 698. In other parts of the line the heaviest losses fell on the 1st, 11th, 15th, 16th, 19th, 20th and 28th. In the afternoon, when two regiments (the 15th Mass., C
the 15th, 16th, 19th, 21st, 22d, 28th, 32d (the largest loss), 58th Infantry, the 1st Heavy Artillery and the 3d Battery. Other regiments engaged were the 12th and 20th, with the 9th and 14th batteries. Capt. D. C. Mumford (19th Mass.) was among the killed. At Bethesda Church (June 1-3),—the action of the right wing at the terrible Cold Harbor,—the largest loss fell on the 36th Mass. Infantry (17 killed, 33 wounded) and next on the 32d and on the 21st; but also in a smaller degree on the 9th, 12th, 13th, 22d, 29th, 35th, 56th and 57th Infantry, and the 5th, 9th and 10th batteries. The 19th, 20th, 39th and 58th were also present, with the 11th and 14th batteries, but without loss. The main battle of Cold Harbor (June 3) Some historians, as Fox, treat Bethesda Church and Cold Harbor as separate engagements; others, like Walker, as but one battle. Fighting continued irregularly for twelve days, apart from the unavailing special assault which is identified in history with tha<
ned to different regiments. A messenger sent to Captain Dike of Stoneham, whose company was to be transferred from the 7th Regiment to the 6th, reached him at 2 A. M. He said to the messenger, Tell His Excellency that I shall be at the State House with my full company by 11 o'clock to-day, and he was there. Captain Pratt of the 3d Battalion of Rifles was also assigned to the 6th, as was the company of Captain Sampson of Boston. Captain Pratt received his order late in the afternoon of the 16th, and was in Boston with his company early on the 17th. These were but examples of the promptness to be seen almost everywhere. The first regiment to leave the State was the 4th M. V. M. (Colonel Packard), which went by afternoon train (April 17) to Fall River, to take the steamer for New York and thence to Fortress Monroe. The 6th (Colonel Jones) left for Washington by rail, but at a later hour. The 3d (Colonel Wardrop) was embarked on the steamer Spalding for Fortress Monroe, but remai
in Dike of Stoneham, whose company was to be transferred from the 7th Regiment to the 6th, reached him at 2 A. M. He said to the messenger, Tell His Excellency that I shall be at the State House with my full company by 11 o'clock to-day, and he was there. Captain Pratt of the 3d Battalion of Rifles was also assigned to the 6th, as was the company of Captain Sampson of Boston. Captain Pratt received his order late in the afternoon of the 16th, and was in Boston with his company early on the 17th. These were but examples of the promptness to be seen almost everywhere. The first regiment to leave the State was the 4th M. V. M. (Colonel Packard), which went by afternoon train (April 17) to Fall River, to take the steamer for New York and thence to Fortress Monroe. The 6th (Colonel Jones) left for Washington by rail, but at a later hour. The 3d (Colonel Wardrop) was embarked on the steamer Spalding for Fortress Monroe, but remained in the harbor till morning. The 8th The 8th M.
line of rifle-pits might easily have been carried. I desire, however, to commend the great gallantry and good behavior of Colonel Macy.... He did everything that a brave man and a soldier could do. (Official War Records, 87, p 248.) There was heavy skirmishing and some alternate success and defeat. General Miles of Massachusetts finally succeeded General Barlow, who had never recovered from his terrible wounds at Antietam and Gettysburg, and had to resign the command of his division on the 18th, though he attempted a few days later, unsuccessfully, to resume it, and had to be carried from the field on a stretcher. This distinguished officer has often been claimed as a Massachusetts man, and certainly came very near being such. His mother was born in Massachusetts and had chiefly resided there, even after her marriage, though not just at the time of his birth; and the son had been almost wholly educated there. At Deep Bottom the Confederates remained in possession of the fiel
illy, Lieut.-Col. Joseph P. Rice of the 21st, with Capt. John D. Frazer, and Lieuts. Henry A. Beckwith, Frederick A. Bemis and William B. Hill, also Lieut. Alexander Barrett of the 28th. The losses fell upon these two regiments, especially on the 21st, which lost thirty-eight killed and mortally wounded out of four hundred. The 8th Mass. Battery was also engaged, but without loss. On the following day, September 2, General Pope was withdrawn; he returned to Washington and his army was merget. D. C. Mumford (19th Mass.) was among the killed. At Bethesda Church (June 1-3),—the action of the right wing at the terrible Cold Harbor,—the largest loss fell on the 36th Mass. Infantry (17 killed, 33 wounded) and next on the 32d and on the 21st; but also in a smaller degree on the 9th, 12th, 13th, 22d, 29th, 35th, 56th and 57th Infantry, and the 5th, 9th and 10th batteries. The 19th, 20th, 39th and 58th were also present, with the 11th and 14th batteries, but without loss. The main b
lry, 3d, 4th, 5th Regiments of Cavalry, 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th, 11th, 15th, 16th Batteries Light Artillery, 1st, 2d, 3d, 4th regiments of Heavy Artillery. On Friday, 22d instant (Forefathers' Day), the colors will be escorted from Colonel Clarke's headquarters, No. 2 Bulfinch Street, to the State House, where they will be formally rtted terms of service in the field prior to May 15, 1865, the colors of which are deposited in the State House, desire to take part in the flag reception on the 22d instant, referred to in General Order No. 18, current series, the Commander-in-Chief most cordially complies with their wishes. The colors of these organizations will be handed them on the morning of the 22d, upon proper requisition. They are to be returned at the close of the services. Maj.-Gen. Darius N. Couch of Taunton, ranking officer of volunteers in Massachusetts, has been invited to take command of the troops. Should he decline, Brevet Maj.-Gen. George H. Gordon of Boston, next in r
this young officer. Official War Records, 68, p. 156. the 23d and 27th also losing, while the 40th was present but not seriously engaged. At Ashland (May 11) the 1st Mass. Cavalry, being detached with others to make a sudden attack upon Ashland Station, lost 6 killed, including Lieut. E. P. Hopkins of Williamstown. At Drewry's Bluff (May 12-16) the Star Brigade, with the 4th Cavalry (1 battalion), again met the enemy, with much heavier losses than at Swift Creek, the losses falling on the 23d, 24th, 25th, 27th and 40th Mass. Infantry. On the first day a portion of the enemy's line of defence was carried with small loss; on the 16th Butler was forced back to his entrenchments, the Confederates entrenching strongly in front, thus leaving him bottled up, in Grant's celebrated phrase, and requiring but a small force of the enemy to keep him there. Grant's report as lieutenant-general, dated July 22, 1865. See the text in Century War Book, IV, 147. General Beauregard's statement o
p 780. including Lieuts. H. J. Parker of Townsend and E. L. Bumpus of Braintree. At Cassville, Ga., both regiments were engaged (May 19-22), with small loss. At Kenesaw Mountain they had several engagements in June, the 33d making another fine charge, and losing 11 killed or mortally wounded, including the 2d lieutenant, C. H. Lord of Ipswich. By July 17 the 33d had been reduced to a mere skeleton regiment. The 2d Mass. was in the breastworks before Atlanta from July 22, 1864, and on the 30th Lieutenant-Colonel Morse of that regiment, being field officer of the day, surprised the enemy's pickets in his front and captured them in their rifle-pits. The regiment was then ordered to the support of the picket line and hastily threw up breastworks. They were within two hundred yards of the enemy's forts, and under a close and hot fire of his artillery, infantry and sharpshooters. Colonel Cogswell's own narrative, in Adjutant General's Report, January, 1868, p. 213. Here the regimen
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...