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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1: prelminary narrative. Search the whole document.

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Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
nel Packard), which went by afternoon train (April 17) to Fall River, to take the steamer for New York and thence to Fortress Monroe. The 6th (Colonel Jones) left for Washington by rail, but at a later hour. The 3d (Colonel Wardrop) was embarked on the steamer Spalding for Fortress Monroe, but remained in the harbor till morning. The 8th The 8th M. V. M. came mainly from Essex County; the 3d and 4th mainly from Norfolk, Plymouth and Bristol; the 6th mainly from Middlesex, with one compan regiment that had marched through that city in advance of all others, while two other regiments were on the sea for Fortress Monroe. Schouler, I, 77. In addition, on April 19, Col. S. C. Lawrence of the 5th M. V. M. was ordered to report for dut War issued orders that steamers should be ready on March 18 to transport the newly organized Army of the Potomac to Fortress Monroe, and from March 17 to April 1 the troops embarked. They included the following Massachusetts infantry regiments: th
Blakely (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
iscovered the main fort to be abandoned, as also were Petersburg and Richmond the next day. The 61st lost 7 killed and mortally wounded, among whom was Lieut. Thomas B. Hart. Lieut. Lewis Munger (2d Mass. Cavalry) was killed a day or two previous, as was Lieut. Samuel Storrow (2d Infantry) at Black Creek, N. C., on March 16, 1865. In the subsequent race for final victory between the winning army and that already practically defeated, the Massachusetts troops took their full share. At Fort Blakeley (April 2-9) the 31st Infantry and the 2d, 4th, 7th and 15th batteries were engaged, with a loss of one man in the 7th. At Sailor's Creek (April 6) the 37th Infantry lost considerably, but the 19th, 20th and 28th Infantry, the 2d Cavalry and the 1st Heavy Artillery escaped without loss of life. At High Bridge (April 6) the 10th Battery had no loss, but the 4th Cavalry (Col. Francis Washburn), with a force of only 12 officers and 67 men, was surrounded by the Confederate cavalry, under
Black Creek (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
eer regiment, and now in its first battle. The Confederates having lost and retaken Fort Mahone, the 61st carried it, as far as the parapet, and, holding on till after dark, its skirmishers then discovered the main fort to be abandoned, as also were Petersburg and Richmond the next day. The 61st lost 7 killed and mortally wounded, among whom was Lieut. Thomas B. Hart. Lieut. Lewis Munger (2d Mass. Cavalry) was killed a day or two previous, as was Lieut. Samuel Storrow (2d Infantry) at Black Creek, N. C., on March 16, 1865. In the subsequent race for final victory between the winning army and that already practically defeated, the Massachusetts troops took their full share. At Fort Blakeley (April 2-9) the 31st Infantry and the 2d, 4th, 7th and 15th batteries were engaged, with a loss of one man in the 7th. At Sailor's Creek (April 6) the 37th Infantry lost considerably, but the 19th, 20th and 28th Infantry, the 2d Cavalry and the 1st Heavy Artillery escaped without loss of life.
Lynn (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
Colonel Jones of the 6th Regiment (at Lowell), Colonel Packard of the 4th (at Quincy), Colonel Wardrop of the 3d (at New Bedford) and Colonel Munroe of the 8th (at Lynn), requiring them to muster their commands on Boston Common forthwith. The question which militia company arrived first in Boston is not wholly easy to settle. days great aid was given in the care of the Massachusetts regiments by a soldiers' agency, established at Washington under the auspices of Col. Gardner W. Tufts of Lynn, this being first instituted on the arrival of the 6th Regiment with its wounded, April 19, 1861, and afterwards expanding until it included not merely the oversigur colors. 7th Infantry, a Bristol County regiment, 40 men, carrying two colors; was commanded by Maj. J. B. Leonard. 8th Infantry, Col. B. F. Peach, Jr., of Lynn, 60 men, two colors. 9th Infantry, Col. P. R. Guiney, 30 men. 10th Infantry, Lieut.-Col. J. B. Parsons, 10 officers, 20 men, two flags. 11th Infantry, Lie
Hampden (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
rcester, Major (afterwards general) Devens, received its orders on April 20, and was in line on the afternoon of that day; and was joined later (May 1) by Capt. Albert Dodd's company from Boston. This completed the list of the three months volunteers, whose statistics were as follows:— Statistics of the Three Months Volunteers. Commissioned Officers.Enlisted Men.Total. Barnstable County,-66 Berkshire County37376 Bristol County21192213 Essex County71857928 Franklin County-11 Hampden County-33 Hampshire County-22 Middlesex County57882939 Norfolk County21391412 Plymouth County19333352 Suffolk County27325352 Worcester County24339363 Other States,15657 Residence not given,-3232 Totals,2443,4923,736 When we stop to consider what an utterly peaceful community had been, until within a week or two, that which these regiments represented, it is impossible not to admire the promptness with which they took up arms. In the later fatigues of the war we looked back almost
Shelburne Falls (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
Mass. Infantry and next to that upon the 15th. Brigade after brigade of Confederates was sent forward upon our line, but each was resisted and decisively defeated, the Union troops, when driven back, sometimes making a counter-charge and establishing a new line in advance of the previous one. Here Col. Thomas Cass of the 9th was mortally wounded, and his lieutenants, John H. Rafferty and Edward McSweeny, were killed. General Devens, who was in this battle, said of Maj. Ozro Miller of Shelburne Falls (10th Mass.), who was killed in this fight, I know of no one among the heroic dead more worthy to be mentioned by name than Major Miller. Linked with him was the memory of Lieut. James Jackson Lowell See his memoir in Harvard Memorial Biographies, I, 422. (20th Mass.), who fell at Malvern Hill and had been previously wounded at Ball's Bluff, where his cousin, Lieutenant Putnam, had been killed. Brig.-Gen. I. N. Palmer, commanding brigade, says in his report, The 10th Mass., after s
Knoxville (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
y toilsome marches and small engagements in Kentucky, Tennessee and Mississippi, having been transferred from North Carolina and having set out from Baltimore on March 24, 1863, to take part in the advance on Jackson, Miss., and the siege of Knoxville, Tenn. In the former attack several companies of the 36th Mass. did active duty as skirmishers on June 11 before the city, their colonel being in command of the brigade; and on the evacuation of Jackson the 35th Mass. in line of skirmishers were tharp attack by Hood upon three small regiments (the 36th Mass., the 8th Michigan and the 45th Pennsylvania), which narrowly escaped capture, the 36th being at this time under command of Maj. (afterwards general) W. F. Draper. In the siege of Knoxville, Tenn., the 21st, 29th, 35th and 36th Infantry were all engaged, with small losses for each; and it was the pickets of the 36th, under command of Capt. T. E. Ames of Co. B, which discovered and reported the raising of the siege by General Longstree
Salem (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
both as the Salem Light Infantry and the Salem Zouaves; and on his returning to Salem that night he determined to raise a company for himself, and began recruiting ovy losses, at New Berne (March 14). At this battle Lieut.-Col. Henry Merritt of Salem (23d Mass.) was killed, and Acting Adjt. Frazar A. Stearns (21st Mass.), son of the 35th Mass. lost five, including one officer, Lieut. Charles F. Williams of Salem. An injury to it, even more serious, was the loss of an arm by its commander, his memoir by Mrs P. A. Hanaford (Boston, 1866), entitled The Young Captain. of Salem and Clark S. Simonds of Fitchburg, with Lieuts. Thomas J. Spurr of Worcester aner regiments there fell, of conspicuous officers, Capt. George W. Batchelder of Salem (19th Mass. Infantry), Capt. John Saunders (1st Mass. Sharpshooters), Lieut. N troops, which made up the bulk of the retreating force. In the assault upon Salem on May 3, Colonel Johns of the 7th Mass. Infantry, a West Point graduate, led a
Drewry's Bluff (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
antry and the 25th South Carolina found themselves face to face. The 25th Mass. lost 14 killed (including Lieut. C. E. Upton), Colonel Pickett pays a fine tribute to this young officer. Official War Records, 68, p. 156. the 23d and 27th also losing, while the 40th was present but not seriously engaged. At Ashland (May 11) the 1st Mass. Cavalry, being detached with others to make a sudden attack upon Ashland Station, lost 6 killed, including Lieut. E. P. Hopkins of Williamstown. At Drewry's Bluff (May 12-16) the Star Brigade, with the 4th Cavalry (1 battalion), again met the enemy, with much heavier losses than at Swift Creek, the losses falling on the 23d, 24th, 25th, 27th and 40th Mass. Infantry. On the first day a portion of the enemy's line of defence was carried with small loss; on the 16th Butler was forced back to his entrenchments, the Confederates entrenching strongly in front, thus leaving him bottled up, in Grant's celebrated phrase, and requiring but a small force of
West Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
ate were from civil life, The next one was that of Gen. David Hunter (August 13), and the next that of Gen. E. A. Hitchcock (Feb. 10, 1862), both these being West Point graduates. and as two of these were from Massachusetts, the seniority thus established had an important and not always a favorable bearing on the position of Maler, upon whom it devolved to select a commander for this night expedition, had at his command, in the colonel of the 1st Vermont, John W. Phelps, an officer of West Point training, Mexican war experience and proved courage; but, passing by him, he designated to command the night attack a militia brigadier from Massachusetts, Gen.tain) W. W. Swan, U. S. A., also of Massachusetts. At Chantilly, Sept. 1, 1862, fell prematurely a Massachusetts officer, Gen. Isaac I. Stevens, who had left West Point, it is said, with higher honors than had been won by any previous graduate. He led an attack on foot at the head of the 79th New York, a Scotch regiment. The
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