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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1: prelminary narrative. Search the whole document.

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Louisville (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
ing Port Royal or Fernandina. It appears from the Confederate correspondence in Official War Records that there were from time to time propositions of this kind from hot-headed officers, as Gens. John M. Huger and David Ruggles, but that these were uniformly repressed by General Beauregard on the simple ground that the gunboats made it absolutely impossible. So long as the enemy has command of the river with his gunboats, the recovery of New Orleans must depend upon our taking St. Louis, Louisville, Cincinnati, Washington and Baltimore, which I think could be done before long by a proper combination of our still latent forces and resources. Official War Records, XV, 794. In other words, five large Northern cities must be taken first! Meanwhile, he adds, a proper organization of our State forces can keep the enemy within the limits of this desirable end. Official War Records, XV, 794. The correspondence of the Confederate War Department with both Beauregard and Ruggles seems to
Jackson (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
the 21st (Lieut.-Col. G. P. Hawkes). They had many toilsome marches and small engagements in Kentucky, Tennessee and Mississippi, having been transferred from North Carolina and having set out from Baltimore on March 24, 1863, to take part in the advance on Jackson, Miss., and the siege of Knoxville, Tenn. In the former attack several companies of the 36th Mass. did active duty as skirmishers on June 11 before the city, their colonel being in command of the brigade; and on the evacuation of Jackson the 35th Mass. in line of skirmishers were the first to enter the city, the 29th being the reserve. The losses of all these were small. Official War Records, 37, pp. 561, 573; 51, pp. 552, 553, 580. At Blue Springs, Tenn. (October 10), there was a skirmish without actual loss, but in which Major Goodell of the 36th Infantry, a most valuable officer, was severely wounded; another at Lenoir's, Tenn. (November 15), without loss; and one near Campbell's Station (November 16), in which the 2
Bull Run, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
All military historians agree, moreover, that the mere comparison of losses is one of the most superficial grounds of comparison between military commands. The first duty of an officer is to sacrifice his troops where it is necessary; his second, to guard them against needless sacrifice. His skill and foresight and the discipline and coolness of the troops whom he commands will often save them from losses which poor officers and insufficient discipline would incur. The losses suffered at Bull Run, for instance, were not those of an army but of a mob in uniform, as yet undisciplined; or, as Governor Andrew said, of an aggregation of town meetings. The governor himself wrote, on June 4, 1862, to Col. G. H. Gordon, commanding a brigade under Major-General Banks: Permit me, in closing, to congratulate you upon your nomination to the rank of brigadier-general, and also upon the brilliant success achieved by the withdrawal of our forces, with so little loss. Schouler, I, 334. After
Norfolk (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
April 20, and was in line on the afternoon of that day; and was joined later (May 1) by Capt. Albert Dodd's company from Boston. This completed the list of the three months volunteers, whose statistics were as follows:— Statistics of the Three Months Volunteers. Commissioned Officers.Enlisted Men.Total. Barnstable County,-66 Berkshire County37376 Bristol County21192213 Essex County71857928 Franklin County-11 Hampden County-33 Hampshire County-22 Middlesex County57882939 Norfolk County21391412 Plymouth County19333352 Suffolk County27325352 Worcester County24339363 Other States,15657 Residence not given,-3232 Totals,2443,4923,736 When we stop to consider what an utterly peaceful community had been, until within a week or two, that which these regiments represented, it is impossible not to admire the promptness with which they took up arms. In the later fatigues of the war we looked back almost with wonder on the enthusiasm which had welcomed these early regim
Braintree (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
ow him up the ridge. Report of Maj.-Gen. Carl von Baumbach, commanding regiment. Official War Records, 55, 208. Both the 2d and 33d took active part in the battle of Resaca (May 13-16, 1864), the former losing 5 killed or mortally wounded. The 33d again made a fine charge, charging and carrying three fortified hills in succession, but having 24 killed or mortally wounded, Adjutant General's Report, January, 1865, p 780. including Lieuts. H. J. Parker of Townsend and E. L. Bumpus of Braintree. At Cassville, Ga., both regiments were engaged (May 19-22), with small loss. At Kenesaw Mountain they had several engagements in June, the 33d making another fine charge, and losing 11 killed or mortally wounded, including the 2d lieutenant, C. H. Lord of Ipswich. By July 17 the 33d had been reduced to a mere skeleton regiment. The 2d Mass. was in the breastworks before Atlanta from July 22, 1864, and on the 30th Lieutenant-Colonel Morse of that regiment, being field officer of the da
Station West (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
e brigade; and on the evacuation of Jackson the 35th Mass. in line of skirmishers were the first to enter the city, the 29th being the reserve. The losses of all these were small. Official War Records, 37, pp. 561, 573; 51, pp. 552, 553, 580. At Blue Springs, Tenn. (October 10), there was a skirmish without actual loss, but in which Major Goodell of the 36th Infantry, a most valuable officer, was severely wounded; another at Lenoir's, Tenn. (November 15), without loss; and one near Campbell's Station (November 16), in which the 29th and 36th lost slightly. In this case there was a sharp attack by Hood upon three small regiments (the 36th Mass., the 8th Michigan and the 45th Pennsylvania), which narrowly escaped capture, the 36th being at this time under command of Maj. (afterwards general) W. F. Draper. In the siege of Knoxville, Tenn., the 21st, 29th, 35th and 36th Infantry were all engaged, with small losses for each; and it was the pickets of the 36th, under command of Capt. T
Aldie (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
part, was the first instance where the Union cavalry really showed itself the equal of a similar Confederate force. In the much more important cavalry battle of Aldie (June 17) the 1st Mass. Cavalry bore the brunt of the fight, charging through the town, capturing several prisoners and a battle flag, and holding the ground aftere 4th Cavalry near Petersburg (June 10), the 5th Cavalry at Baylor's Farm (June 15), the 1st Cavalry at Samaria Church (June 24), a detachment of the 2d Cavalry at Aldie (July 6), and the 32d Infantry with the 10th Battery in reserve at Deep Bottom (July 21). A more important affair, also at Deep Bottom, occurred on July 27-28, wheders were equal. The later career of his regiment vindicated this, for it did its full share, especially in those two important engagements at Brandy Station and Aldie, which, in Sheridan's phrase, made the Federal cavalry Crowninshield's 1st Mass. Cavalry, p. 18. and proved it to be henceforward not merely the equal but the s
Fort McAllister (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
S. Navy, I, 366. and her guns were fired to the last, the final shot, discharged by Lieutenant Morris, fatally wounding the Confederate Commander, Captain Buchanan. The final triumph of the Monitor need not be described. In September, 1862, Acting Master Crocker, a Massachusetts officer, was sent up the Sabine River to destroy a railroad bridge, which he did without injury. Soley, p. 143. Commander Downes, a Massachusetts officer, commanded the monitor Nahant in the attack on Fort McAllister, March 3, 1863, and in the attack on Charleston, April 7; the Nahant being in this last attack seriously damaged; her turret so jammed as to prevent its turning, many of the bolts of both turret and pilot-house broken, and the latter rendered nearly untenable by flying bolts and nuts. Porter, p. 376. His vessel assisted, as a reserve, in the capture of the Atlanta in Wassaw Sound, on June 17, and assisted in covering General Gillmore's batteries on Folly Island, July 10, an engageme
Ashland (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
y, they fired until their ammunition was gone, then charged in vain, then retreated in perfect order. At one time they repulsed a charge of the enemy, during which the 25th Mass. Infantry and the 25th South Carolina found themselves face to face. The 25th Mass. lost 14 killed (including Lieut. C. E. Upton), Colonel Pickett pays a fine tribute to this young officer. Official War Records, 68, p. 156. the 23d and 27th also losing, while the 40th was present but not seriously engaged. At Ashland (May 11) the 1st Mass. Cavalry, being detached with others to make a sudden attack upon Ashland Station, lost 6 killed, including Lieut. E. P. Hopkins of Williamstown. At Drewry's Bluff (May 12-16) the Star Brigade, with the 4th Cavalry (1 battalion), again met the enemy, with much heavier losses than at Swift Creek, the losses falling on the 23d, 24th, 25th, 27th and 40th Mass. Infantry. On the first day a portion of the enemy's line of defence was carried with small loss; on the 16th Bu
Summit Point (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
o later. Lieut. Wm. T. Spear was mortally wounded. Lieut. Horace M. Warren, adjutant of the 59th, was also killed, with Capt. J. W. Ingell (15th Mass.) and Lieuts. Robert T. Bourne (22d Mass.) and A. J. White (35th Mass.). Captain Ingell, a brave and valuable officer, who was at the time suffering from a previous wound. (Official Army Records, 87, p. 357.) A small battalion of recruits and re-enlisted men, formerly belonging to the 18th Mass., captured 50 prisoners and a flag. At Summit Point, Va., the 37th Mass. Infantry had a picket skirmish with some loss (August 21), and at Reams' Station (August 23-25) the 28th Infantry and the 10th Battery lost some lives and the latter 19 prisoners. Prisoners were also taken from the 19th and 20th Infantry. At Poplar Spring Church or Peebles' Farm (September 30–October 1) the small remaining band of the 18th Mass. again did itself credit, its captain, Luther S. Bent of Quincy, commanding the skirmish line and being brevetted as major
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