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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1: prelminary narrative. Search the whole document.

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Fernandina, Fla. (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
policy of the Confederates throughout the war was to abstain from all serious attempts to retake points within reach of the salt water, where the navy held control, but rather to let go what was lost and confine themselves to interior lines, where they were strong. They were willing to have it understood that they menaced such points, and New Orleans most of all, but there is no reason to suppose that they had any serious purpose of retaking it, any more than of recapturing Port Royal or Fernandina. It appears from the Confederate correspondence in Official War Records that there were from time to time propositions of this kind from hot-headed officers, as Gens. John M. Huger and David Ruggles, but that these were uniformly repressed by General Beauregard on the simple ground that the gunboats made it absolutely impossible. So long as the enemy has command of the river with his gunboats, the recovery of New Orleans must depend upon our taking St. Louis, Louisville, Cincinnati, Wash
Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
, set forth alone by rail, made his way from Baltimore to Washington on foot, by circuitous routes e whole affair at Baltimore is that entitled Baltimore and the 19th of April, 1861, by George Wm. Brown, chief judge of the supreme bench of Baltimore and mayor of the city in 1861. Colonel Jones's Pennsylvania Central and the Philadelphia & Baltimore railroads, telegraphed to the Secretary of Was impracticable to send more troops through Baltimore, and adding, Shall we send them through Anna day to President Lincoln, March them around Baltimore and not through it. (Lincoln's letter to God a force from the Relay House to march into Baltimore and take possession of Federal Hill. It wastention to re-establishing the route through Baltimore . . . and in this I was well aided by His Ex0.) But, such as it was, this occupation of Baltimore was attributed by Parton and other writers o from North Carolina and having set out from Baltimore on March 24, 1863, to take part in the advan[17 more...]
Essex County (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
he 6th (Colonel Jones) left for Washington by rail, but at a later hour. The 3d (Colonel Wardrop) was embarked on the steamer Spalding for Fortress Monroe, but remained in the harbor till morning. The 8th The 8th M. V. M. came mainly from Essex County; the 3d and 4th mainly from Norfolk, Plymouth and Bristol; the 6th mainly from Middlesex, with one company from Boston and one from Worcester. (Colonel Munroe) was delayed by the desire to attach to it other companies; it was not ordered to preted the list of the three months volunteers, whose statistics were as follows:— Statistics of the Three Months Volunteers. Commissioned Officers.Enlisted Men.Total. Barnstable County,-66 Berkshire County37376 Bristol County21192213 Essex County71857928 Franklin County-11 Hampden County-33 Hampshire County-22 Middlesex County57882939 Norfolk County21391412 Plymouth County19333352 Suffolk County27325352 Worcester County24339363 Other States,15657 Residence not given,-3232 To
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
he real injuries she [the Tennessee] has sustained. Xii. Operations in North Carolina. The expedition to North Carolina under General Burnside was one of the North Carolina under General Burnside was one of the most important events in the early part of the war, as it afforded a valuable test of the new levies; and its immediate success was striking, although it led to no suailed largely from Massachusetts regiments, was an important element in the North Carolina campaign. Two companies of the 27th (G and H), being left at Plymouth, Nn engagement near Kinston March 14, with a small loss; but on the whole the North Carolina service proved less severe than was at first expected, though the loss fromements in Kentucky, Tennessee and Mississippi, having been transferred from North Carolina and having set out from Baltimore on March 24, 1863, to take part in the adiginally colonel of the 24th Mass. Infantry, who had served with distinction in North and South Carolina, and was at the time of his death in command of the First Di
Hanover Court House (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
ions heavy artillery, Col. William S. King commanding. Corps of Infantry: Brig. and Brevet Maj.-Gen. George H. Gordon commanding. First division, Brig.-Gen. Robert Cowdin commanding, regiments from 1 to 20 inclusive. Second division, Brig. and Brevet Maj.-Gen. Charles J. Paine commanding, regiments from 21 to 40 inclusive. Third division, Col. and Brevet Brig.-Gen. William S. Tilton commanding, regiments from 41 to 61 inclusive. Route of march: From the Common to Tremont Street, to Hanover, to Blackstone, to Clinton, to Commercial, to State, to Washington, to Essex, to Harrison Avenue, to Dover, to Washington, to Union Park, to Tremont, to Pleasant, to Boylston, to Arlington, to Beacon, to the Common. On the return of the column to the front of the State House the colors will be delivered to His Excellency Governor Andrew by Major-General Couch and Col. F. N. Clarke. By command of Major-General Couch. Edward W. Hinks, Chief of Staff. On the day appointed the flags
Fontenoy (Wisconsin, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
eing killed or mortally wounded from each, while their supports, the 10th, 15th and 29th, with the 1st, 3d and 5th batteries, suffered more slightly. It was at this battle that the 9th (Irish) Regiment, under Lieutenant-Colonel Guiney, fulfilled the prophecy made by the Hon. Edward Everett in regard to this portion of our people. Their cordial sympathy warrants us in believing that if, on some hard-fought field, should the doubtful day be about to turn against us, the Irish brigade (as at Fontenoy) would rush to the rescue; with the terrible war-cry of Faugh-a-Ballagh they would sweep the foes of the Union before them, like chaff before the wind. On one occasion, having formed their line upon Lieutenant-Colonel Guiney and his two standard bearers, who advanced before them, the commander calling Men, follow your colors, they withstood nine successive charges of the enemy. Eleven officers of the 9th fell in that battle, including Capts. William Madigan, James E. McCafferty of Boston
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
scriptions in Gordon's War Diary, pp. 188, 198, 215, and elsewhere. Xix. Operations in the Department of the South. Some minor engagements occurred in South Carolina in the summer of 1862 in which a few Massachusetts regiments took part; two companies of the First Cavalry at Pocataligo (May 29) under Maj. H. L. Higginson wrman and Johnston. It may be proper to refer again to a fact already mentioned, that the first regiment of freed slaves formed during the war was formed of South Carolina and Florida recruits (volunteers) by Brig.-Gen. Rufus Saxton, military governor of the Department of the South,—he being a Massachusetts man, —and that its orcer killed at Spotsylvania was Brig.-Gen. Thomas Greely Stevenson, originally colonel of the 24th Mass. Infantry, who had served with distinction in North and South Carolina, and was at the time of his death in command of the First Division of the 9th Army Corps. Another important officer who fell was Lieut.-Col. Waldo Merriam of
Secessionville (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
the 54th Mass. There are other descriptions in Gordon's War Diary, pp. 188, 198, 215, and elsewhere. Xix. Operations in the Department of the South. Some minor engagements occurred in South Carolina in the summer of 1862 in which a few Massachusetts regiments took part; two companies of the First Cavalry at Pocataligo (May 29) under Maj. H. L. Higginson without loss, and the 28th Mass. Infantry at Legareas Point (June 2) under Lieut.-Col. M. Moore with only a few wounded men. At Secessionville (June 16) an attack of some force was made on fortified works at James Island, and in this the 28th sustained considerable losses (twenty killed or mortally wounded), the affair being an extremely rash assault upon a strongly fortified redoubt, and being described by one authority in the Department of the South, Judge-Advocate Cowley, Leaves from a Lawyer's Life Afloat and Ashore, p. 60. The author gives a spirited account of the engagement and justly complains of its being slighted b
Port Royal (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
r, in 1857, of William Walker the filibuster, also worked most efficiently, under the direction of the navy department, in boards to report on iron-clads and also on the enemy's coast. In that momentous early success of the war, the capture of Port Royal (Nov. 7, 1861), he was fleet captain, and his promptness in surveying immediately the channel for the larger vessels had much to do with the ultimate success. Flag-Officer Dupont says: By the skill of Commander Davis, the fleet captain, and Mrlines, where they were strong. They were willing to have it understood that they menaced such points, and New Orleans most of all, but there is no reason to suppose that they had any serious purpose of retaking it, any more than of recapturing Port Royal or Fernandina. It appears from the Confederate correspondence in Official War Records that there were from time to time propositions of this kind from hot-headed officers, as Gens. John M. Huger and David Ruggles, but that these were uniformly
Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
ibuted a larger share than any State except New York; indeed, nearly 20,000, or nearly one-fifth of the whole number. Total number of sailors and marines furnished by the States:— Connecticut,2,163 Delaware,94 District of Columbia,1,353 Illinois,2,224 Indiana,1,078 Iowa,5 Kentucky,314 Maine,5,030 Maryland,3,925 Massachusetts,19,983 Michigan,498 Minnesota,3 Missouri,151 New Hampshire,882 New Jersey,8,129 New York,35,164 Ohio,3,274 Pennsylvania,14,307 Rhode Island,1,878 Ve885) reports from Massachusetts 122,781 white troops, 3,966 colored troops and 19,983 sailors, making in all 146,730 men, of whom 13,942 died in the war. The only States surpassing Massachusetts in total number were New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Illinois and Indiana; the same proportion existing in the number of deaths, with the addition that Michigan also slightly exceeded Massachusetts in the proportion of these. The tables in the successive reports of the State Adjutant-General show that e
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