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January 23rd (search for this): chapter 10
sent the audience into convulsions of laughter.--This was one of the carryings-on of the Brain Club. After another such occasion our mother writes:-- Very weary and aching a little. I must keep out of these tomfooleries, though they have their uses. They are much better than some other social entertainments, as after all they present some aesthetic points of interest. They are better than scandal, gluttony, or wild dancing. But the artists and I have still better things to do. January 23. It is always legitimate to wish to rise above one's self, never above others. In this, however, as in other things, we must remember the maxim: Natura nil facit per saltum. All true rising must be gradual and laborious, in such wise that the men of tomorrow shall look down almost imperceptibly upon the men of to-day. All sudden elevations are either imaginary or factitious. If you had not a kingly mind before our coronation, no crown will make a king of you. The true king is somewhere
ften torn between the two, in the main she gave free rein to both, trusting the issue to God. The winter of 1864-65 was an arduous one. She was writing new philosophical essays, and reading them before various circles of friends. The larger audience which she craved was not for the moment attainable. She was studying deeply, reading Latin by way of relaxation, going somewhat into society (Julia and Florence being now of the dancing age), and entertaining a good deal in a quiet way. In February she writes: Much tormented by interruptions. Could not get five quiet minutes at a time. Everybody torments me with every smallest errand. And I am trying to study philosophy! Probably we were troublesome children and made more noise than we should. Her accurate ear for music was often a source of distress to her, as one of us can witness, an indolent child who neglected her practising. As this child drummed over her scales, the door of the upstairs study would open, and a clear voi
March 10th (search for this): chapter 10
Played all last evening for Laura's company to dance. My heart flutters to-day. It is a feeling unknown to me until lately. Now, Laura would have gone barefoot in snow to save her mother pain or fatigue; yet she has no recollection of ever questioning the inevitability of Mamma's playing for all youthful dancing. Grown-up parties were different; for them there were hired musicians, who made inferior music; but for the frolics of the early 'teens, who should play except Mamma ? On March 10, she writes: I have now been too long in my study. I must break out into real life, and learn some more of its lessons. Two days later a lesson began: I stay from church to-day to take care of Maud, who is quite unwell. This is a sacrifice, although I am bound and glad to make it. But I shall miss the church all the week. The child became so ill that all pursuits had to be given up in the care of her. The Journal gives a minute account of this illness, and of the remedies used, amo
t ethical work which contains such powerful moral illustration and instruction. James Freeman [Clarke] does not think much of Sam's book, probably not as well as it deserves. But the knowledge of Sam's personality is the light behind the transparency in all that he does. Lyrical Ventures, by Samuel Ward. These were the closing months of the Civil War. All hearts were lifted up in thankfulness that the end was near. She speaks of it seldom, but her few words are significant. Monday, April 3.... Richmond was taken this morning. Laus Deo On April 10, after Maud's boots, $3.00, vegetables, .12, bread, .04, we read, Ribbons for victory, .40. To-day we have the news of Lee's surrender with the whole remnant of his army. The city is alive with people. All flags hung out — shop windows decorated --processions in the street. All friends meet and shake hands. On the newspaper bulletins such placards as Gloria in excelsis Deo, Thanks be to God! We all call it the grea
April 10th (search for this): chapter 10
d instruction. James Freeman [Clarke] does not think much of Sam's book, probably not as well as it deserves. But the knowledge of Sam's personality is the light behind the transparency in all that he does. Lyrical Ventures, by Samuel Ward. These were the closing months of the Civil War. All hearts were lifted up in thankfulness that the end was near. She speaks of it seldom, but her few words are significant. Monday, April 3.... Richmond was taken this morning. Laus Deo On April 10, after Maud's boots, $3.00, vegetables, .12, bread, .04, we read, Ribbons for victory, .40. To-day we have the news of Lee's surrender with the whole remnant of his army. The city is alive with people. All flags hung out — shop windows decorated --processions in the street. All friends meet and shake hands. On the newspaper bulletins such placards as Gloria in excelsis Deo, Thanks be to God! We all call it the greatest day of our lives. Apples, half-peck, .50. That week wa
April 15th (search for this): chapter 10
ut — shop windows decorated --processions in the street. All friends meet and shake hands. On the newspaper bulletins such placards as Gloria in excelsis Deo, Thanks be to God! We all call it the greatest day of our lives. Apples, half-peck, .50. That week was one of joy and thankfulness for all. Thursday was Fast Day; she went to church to fatigue Satan. Afterwards made a visit to Mrs. who did not seem to have tired her devil out. The joy bells were soon to be silenced. Saturday, April 15, was A black day in history, though outwardly most fair. President Lincoln was assassinated in his box at the theatre, last evening, by J. Wilkes Booth. This atrocious act, which was consummated in a very theatrical manner, is enough to ruin not the Booth family alone, but the theatrical profession. Since my Sammy's death, nothing has happened that has given me so much personal pain as this event. The city is paralyzed. But we can only work on, and trust in God. Our father's
April 19th (search for this): chapter 10
us down to hear the news, come vividly before us to-day, one of the clearest impressions of our youth. Our mother went with him next day to hear Governor Andrew's official announcement of the murder to the Legislature, and heard with deep emotion his quotation from MacBETHeth :-- Besides, this Duncan Hath borne his faculties so meek, hath been So clear in his great office, that his virtues Will plead like angels, trumpet-tongued, against The deep damnation of his taking-off, etc. Wednesday, April 19, was:-- The day of President Lincoln's funeral. A sad, disconnected day. I could not work, but strolled around to see the houses, variously draped in black and white. Went to Bartol's church, not knowing of a service at our own. Bartol's remarks were tender and pathetic. I was pleased to have heard them. Wrote some verses about the President — pretty good, perhaps,--scratching the last nearly in the dark, just before bedtime. This is the poem called Parricide. It begin
April 27th (search for this): chapter 10
t our own. Bartol's remarks were tender and pathetic. I was pleased to have heard them. Wrote some verses about the President — pretty good, perhaps,--scratching the last nearly in the dark, just before bedtime. This is the poem called Parricide. It begins:-- O'er the warrior gauntlet grim Late the silken glove we drew, Bade the watch-fires slacken dim In the dawn's auspicious hue. Staid the armed heel; Still the clanging steel; Joys unwonted thrilled the silence through. On April 27 she heard of Wilkes Booth's deathshot on refusing to give himself up — the best thing that could have happened to himself and his family ; and wrote a second poem entitled Pardon, embodying her second and permanent thought on the subject: Pains the sharp sentence the heart in whose wrath it was uttered, Now thou art cold; Vengeance, the headlong, and Justice, with purpose close mut- tered, Loosen their hold, etc. Brief entries note the closing events of the war. May 13. Worked m
. On April 27 she heard of Wilkes Booth's deathshot on refusing to give himself up — the best thing that could have happened to himself and his family ; and wrote a second poem entitled Pardon, embodying her second and permanent thought on the subject: Pains the sharp sentence the heart in whose wrath it was uttered, Now thou art cold; Vengeance, the headlong, and Justice, with purpose close mut- tered, Loosen their hold, etc. Brief entries note the closing events of the war. May 13. Worked much on Essay. ... In the evening said to Laura: Jeff Davis will be taken tomorrow. Was so strongly impressed with the thought that I wanted to say it to Chev, but thought it was too silly. May 14. The first thing I heard in the morning was the news of the capture of Jeff Davis. This made me think of my preluding the night before.... Other things beside essays demanded work in these days. The great struggle was now over, and with it the long strain on heart and nerve, culmin
er second and permanent thought on the subject: Pains the sharp sentence the heart in whose wrath it was uttered, Now thou art cold; Vengeance, the headlong, and Justice, with purpose close mut- tered, Loosen their hold, etc. Brief entries note the closing events of the war. May 13. Worked much on Essay. ... In the evening said to Laura: Jeff Davis will be taken tomorrow. Was so strongly impressed with the thought that I wanted to say it to Chev, but thought it was too silly. May 14. The first thing I heard in the morning was the news of the capture of Jeff Davis. This made me think of my preluding the night before.... Other things beside essays demanded work in these days. The great struggle was now over, and with it the long strain on heart and nerve, culminating in the tragic emotion of the past weeks. The inevitable reaction set in. Her whole nature cried out for play, and play meant work. Working all day for the Girls' Party, to-morrow evening. Got only a
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