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John A. Andrew (search for this): chapter 10
as he called us down to hear the news, come vividly before us to-day, one of the clearest impressions of our youth. Our mother went with him next day to hear Governor Andrew's official announcement of the murder to the Legislature, and heard with deep emotion his quotation from MacBETHeth :-- Besides, this Duncan Hath borne hie end, or lose it forever. The move to Boylston Place was in November. Early in the month a frisking took place, with amusing results. Our mother went with Governor and Mrs. Andrew and a gay party to Barnstable for the annual festival and ball. The Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company acted as escort, and — according toMrs. Andrew and a gay party to Barnstable for the annual festival and ball. The Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company acted as escort, and — according to custom — the band of the Company furnished the music. For some reason — the townspeople thought because the pretty girls were all engaged beforehand for the dance — the officer in command stopped the music at twelve o'clock, to the great distress of the Barnstable people who had ordered their carriages at two or later. The pa
William A. Duncan (search for this): chapter 10
d that has given me so much personal pain as this event. The city is paralyzed. But we can only work on, and trust in God. Our father's face of tragedy, the anguish in his voice, as he called us down to hear the news, come vividly before us to-day, one of the clearest impressions of our youth. Our mother went with him next day to hear Governor Andrew's official announcement of the murder to the Legislature, and heard with deep emotion his quotation from MacBETHeth :-- Besides, this Duncan Hath borne his faculties so meek, hath been So clear in his great office, that his virtues Will plead like angels, trumpet-tongued, against The deep damnation of his taking-off, etc. Wednesday, April 19, was:-- The day of President Lincoln's funeral. A sad, disconnected day. I could not work, but strolled around to see the houses, variously draped in black and white. Went to Bartol's church, not knowing of a service at our own. Bartol's remarks were tender and pathetic. I was pleased
Jesus Christ (search for this): chapter 10
our own supreme, you are your own God, and self-worship is true atheism. It is better to use a bad man by his better side than a good man by his worse side. Christ said that he was older than Abraham. I think that he used this expression as a measure of value. His thoughts were further back in the primal Ideal necessity. He did not speak of any personal life antedating his own existence.... In his own sense, Christ was also newer than we are, for his doctrine is still beyond the attainment of all and the appreciation of most of us. There is no essential religious element in negation. Saw Booth in Hamlet --still first-rate, I think, although party kept me busy all day. It was pleasant enough.... ... My peace I give unto you is a wonderful saying. What peace have most of us to give each other? But Christ has given peace to the world, peace at least as an ideal object, to be ever sought, though never fully attained. September 10.... Read Kant on state rights. A
n Convention, and heard much tolerable speaking, but nothing of any special value or importance. She now writes:-- I really suffered last evening from the crowd of things which I wished to say, and which, at one word of command, would have flashed into life and, I think, into eloquence. It is by a fine use of natural logic that the Quaker denomination allows women to speak, under the pressure of religious conviction. In Christ Jesus there is neither male nor female, is a good sentence. Paul did not carry this out in his church discipline, yet, one sees, he felt it in his religious contemplation. I feel that a woman's whole moral responsibility is lowered by the fact that she must never obey a transcendent command of conscience. Man can give her nothing to take the place of this. It is the divine right of the human soul. The fatigue and excitement of the Festival had to be paid for: the inevitable reaction set in. June 3. Decidedly I have spleen in these days. Througho
Battle Hymn (search for this): chapter 10
t, too, quite near me. I shortened the essay somewhat. It was well heard and received. Afterwards I read my poem called Philosophy, and was urged to recite my Battle Hymn, which I did. I was much gratified by the kind reception I met with and the sight of many friends of my youth. A most pleasant lunch afterwards at Mrs. Hunt'so the Boys' Reform School at Westboro. In the yard where the boys were collected, the guests were introduced. Quite a number crowded to see the Author of the Battle Hymn. Two or three said to me: Are you the woman that wrote that Battle Hymn? When I told them that I was, they seemed much pleased. This I felt to be a great honBattle Hymn? When I told them that I was, they seemed much pleased. This I felt to be a great honor. The next day again she is harassed with correcting proofs and furnishing copy. Ran to Bartol for a little help, which he gave me. The Reverend C. A. Bartol was our next-door neighbor in Chestnut Street, a most kind and friendly one. His venerable figure, wrapped in a wide cloak, walking always in the middle of the road
Chapter 10: the wider outlookv1865; aet. 46 The word Had I one of thy words, my Master, With a spirit and tone of thine, I would run to the farthest Indies To scatter the joy divine. I would waken the frozen ocean With a billowy burst of joy: Stir the ships at their grim ice-moorings The summer passes by. I would enter court and hovel, Forgetful of mien or dress, With a treasure that all should ask for, An errand that all should bless. I seek for thy words, my Master, With a spelling vexed and slow: With scanty illuminations In an alphabet of woe. But while I am searching, scanning A lesson none ask to hear, My life writeth out thy sentence Divinely just and dear. J. W. H. The war was nearly over, and all hearts were with Grant and Lee in their long duel before Richmond. Patriotism and philosophy together ruled our mother's life in these days; the former more apparent in her daily walk among us, the latter in the quiet hours with her Journal. The Journal for 1865
George Bancroft (search for this): chapter 10
my childhood, was touching and impressive. Hither my father was careful to bring us. Imperfect as his doctrine now appears to me, he looks down upon me from the height of a better life than mine, and still appears to me as my superior. A little nervous about my reading. Reached Mrs. [Richard] Hunt's at twelve. Saw the sweet little boy. Mrs. Hunt very kind and cordial. At one Mr. Hunt led me to the studio which I found well filled, my two aunts in the front row, to my great surprise; Bancroft, too, quite near me. I shortened the essay somewhat. It was well heard and received. Afterwards I read my poem called Philosophy, and was urged to recite my Battle Hymn, which I did. I was much gratified by the kind reception I met with and the sight of many friends of my youth. A most pleasant lunch afterwards at Mrs. Hunt's, with Tweedys, Tuckermans, and Laura. I see no outlook before me. So many fields for activity, but for passivity, which seems incumbent upon me, only uselessnes
Mendelssohn (search for this): chapter 10
ety, at its semi-centennial, in May, 1865. Our mother sang alto in the chorus. The Journal records daily, sometimes semi-daily, rehearsals and performances, Kant squeezed to the wall, and getting with difficulty his daily hour or half-hour. Mendelssohn's Hymn of praise and Elijah ; Haydn's Creation, Handel's Messiah and Israel in Egypt ; she sang in them all. Here is a sample Festival day:-- Attended morning rehearsal, afternoon concert, and sang in the evening. We gave Israel in Egypt and Mendelssohn's Hymn of Praise. I got a short reading of Kant, which helped me through the day. But so much music is more than human nerves can respond to with pleasure. This confirms my belief in the limited power of our sensibilities in the direction of pure enjoyment. The singing in the choruses fatigues me less than hearing so many things. After describing the glorious final performance of the Messiah, she writes:-- So farewell, delightful Festival! I little thought what a wee
MacBETHeth (search for this): chapter 10
my's death, nothing has happened that has given me so much personal pain as this event. The city is paralyzed. But we can only work on, and trust in God. Our father's face of tragedy, the anguish in his voice, as he called us down to hear the news, come vividly before us to-day, one of the clearest impressions of our youth. Our mother went with him next day to hear Governor Andrew's official announcement of the murder to the Legislature, and heard with deep emotion his quotation from MacBETHeth :-- Besides, this Duncan Hath borne his faculties so meek, hath been So clear in his great office, that his virtues Will plead like angels, trumpet-tongued, against The deep damnation of his taking-off, etc. Wednesday, April 19, was:-- The day of President Lincoln's funeral. A sad, disconnected day. I could not work, but strolled around to see the houses, variously draped in black and white. Went to Bartol's church, not knowing of a service at our own. Bartol's remarks were tend
C. A. Bartol (search for this): chapter 10
d not work, but strolled around to see the houses, variously draped in black and white. Went to Bartol's church, not knowing of a service at our own. Bartol's remarks were tender and pathetic. I wasBartol's remarks were tender and pathetic. I was pleased to have heard them. Wrote some verses about the President — pretty good, perhaps,--scratching the last nearly in the dark, just before bedtime. This is the poem called Parricide. It b of Tyndall. Tea with the Bartols. Talk with [E. P.] Whipple, who furiously attacked Tacitus. Bartol and I, who know a good deal more about him, made a strong fight in his behalf. Working all dahonor. The next day again she is harassed with correcting proofs and furnishing copy. Ran to Bartol for a little help, which he gave me. The Reverend C. A. Bartol was our next-door neighbor in The Reverend C. A. Bartol was our next-door neighbor in Chestnut Street, a most kind and friendly one. His venerable figure, wrapped in a wide cloak, walking always in the middle of the road (we never knew why he eschewed the sidewalk), is one of the ple
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