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Horace Mann (search for this): chapter 10
A few days after this she writes: ... Sumner in the evening — a long and pleasant visit. He is a very sweet-hearted man, and does not grow old. The Musical Festival had not yet exacted full arrears of payment; she was too weary even to enjoy the Valley at first; but after a few days of its beloved seclusion she shook off fatigue and was herself again, reading Kant and Livy, teaching the children, and gathering mussels on the beach. She flits up to town to see the new statue of Horace Mann, in order to criticise it for Chev's pamphlet ; Dr. Howe raised the money for this statue. meets William Hunt, who praises its simplicity and parental character; and Charles Sumner, who tells her it looks better on a nearer view. The day after--we abode in the Valley, when three detachments of company tumbled in upon us, to wit, Colonel Higginson and Mrs. McKay, the Tweedys and John Field, and the Gulstons. All were friendly. Only on my speaking of the rudeness occasionally shown
A. Lincoln (search for this): chapter 10
seem to have tired her devil out. The joy bells were soon to be silenced. Saturday, April 15, was A black day in history, though outwardly most fair. President Lincoln was assassinated in his box at the theatre, last evening, by J. Wilkes Booth. This atrocious act, which was consummated in a very theatrical manner, is enouice, that his virtues Will plead like angels, trumpet-tongued, against The deep damnation of his taking-off, etc. Wednesday, April 19, was:-- The day of President Lincoln's funeral. A sad, disconnected day. I could not work, but strolled around to see the houses, variously draped in black and white. Went to Bartol's church, es, and a little bread and butter. Went in the express wagon.... At the picnic I repeated my Cambridge poem, .. . and read Amanda's Inventory and my long poem on Lincoln's death.... Duty depends on an objective, happiness upon a subjective, sense. The first is capable of a general and particular definition, the second is not.
Edwin Booth (search for this): chapter 10
better side than a good man by his worse side. Christ said that he was older than Abraham. I think that he used this expression as a measure of value. His thoughts were further back in the primal Ideal necessity. He did not speak of any personal life antedating his own existence.... In his own sense, Christ was also newer than we are, for his doctrine is still beyond the attainment of all and the appreciation of most of us. There is no essential religious element in negation. Saw Booth in Hamlet --still first-rate, I think, although he has played it one hundred nights in New York. Hamlet is an aesthetic Evangel. I know of no direct ethical work which contains such powerful moral illustration and instruction. James Freeman [Clarke] does not think much of Sam's book, probably not as well as it deserves. But the knowledge of Sam's personality is the light behind the transparency in all that he does. Lyrical Ventures, by Samuel Ward. These were the closing months of
it for Chev's pamphlet ; Dr. Howe raised the money for this statue. meets William Hunt, who praises its simplicity and parental character; and Charles Sumner, who tells her it looks better on a nearer view. The day after--we abode in the Valley, when three detachments of company tumbled in upon us, to wit, Colonel Higginson and Mrs. McKay, the Tweedys and John Field, and the Gulstons. All were friendly. Only on my speaking of the rudeness occasionally shown me by a certain lady, Mrs. Tweedy said: But that was in the presence of your superiors, was it not? I replied: I do not know that I was ever in Mrs. X.'s company under those circumstances! After which we all laughed. She was at this time sitting to Miss Margaret Foley for a portrait medallion and was writing philosophy and poetry. Family and household matters also claimed their share of attention. Finished reading over Polarity [her essay]. Reading to the children, Foxes have holes, and birds of the air have nest
t is apparent; the entries become largely notes of study, to take final shape in lectures and essays. A morning visit received in study hours is a sickness from which the day does not recover. I can neither afford to be idle, nor to have friends who are so. Man is impelled by inward force, regulated by outward circumstance. He is inspired from within, moralized from without.... A man may be devout in himself, but he can be moral only in his relation with other men. .... Early to Mary Dorr's, to consult about the Charade. Read Kant and wrote as usual. Spent the afternoon in getting up my costumes for the Charade. The word was Au-thor-ship.... Authorship was expressed by my appearing as a great composer, Jerry Abbott performing my Oratorio — a very comical thing, indeed. The whole was a success. No one who saw the Oratorio can forget it. Mr. Abbott, our neighbor in Chestnut Street, was a comedian who would have adorned any stage. The book of the Oratorio was a simple
Margaret Foley (search for this): chapter 10
de in the Valley, when three detachments of company tumbled in upon us, to wit, Colonel Higginson and Mrs. McKay, the Tweedys and John Field, and the Gulstons. All were friendly. Only on my speaking of the rudeness occasionally shown me by a certain lady, Mrs. Tweedy said: But that was in the presence of your superiors, was it not? I replied: I do not know that I was ever in Mrs. X.'s company under those circumstances! After which we all laughed. She was at this time sitting to Miss Margaret Foley for a portrait medallion and was writing philosophy and poetry. Family and household matters also claimed their share of attention. Finished reading over Polarity [her essay]. Reading to the children, Foxes have holes, and birds of the air have nests, but the Son of Man hath not where to lay his head --my little Maud's eyes filled with tears. Much worried by want of preparedness for today's picnic. Managed to get up three chickens killed on short notice, a pan of excellent gi
Catherine Beecher (search for this): chapter 10
... Wednesday, June 21. Attended the meeting at Faneuil Hall, for the consideration of reconstruction of the Southern States. Dana made a statement to the effect that voting was a civic, not a natural, right, and built up the propriety of negro suffrage on the basis first of military right, then of duty to the negro, this being the only mode of enabling him to protect himself against his late master. His treatment was intended to be exhaustive, and was able, though cold and conceited. Beecher tumbled up on the platform immediately after, not having heard him, knocked the whole question to pieces with his great democratic power, his humor, his passion, and his magnetism. It was Nature after Art, and his nature is much greater than Dana's art. A few days after this she writes: ... Sumner in the evening — a long and pleasant visit. He is a very sweet-hearted man, and does not grow old. The Musical Festival had not yet exacted full arrears of payment; she was too weary even
Charles Sumner (search for this): chapter 10
ume of Kant back to the Athenaeum for the yearly rearrangement. Could not interest myself in anything.... Visited old Mrs. Sumner, The mother of Charles Sumner. whose chariot and horses are nearly ready. At this time there was some question oCharles Sumner. whose chariot and horses are nearly ready. At this time there was some question of selling Lawton's Valley for economic reasons. The exigency passed, but the following words show the depth of her feeling on the subject: If I have any true philosophy, any sincere religion, these must support me under the privation of the Valley.etism. It was Nature after Art, and his nature is much greater than Dana's art. A few days after this she writes: ... Sumner in the evening — a long and pleasant visit. He is a very sweet-hearted man, and does not grow old. The Musical FestiDr. Howe raised the money for this statue. meets William Hunt, who praises its simplicity and parental character; and Charles Sumner, who tells her it looks better on a nearer view. The day after--we abode in the Valley, when three detachments of
September 10th (search for this): chapter 10
d has rights without duties. Men have rights and duties. If a slave have not rights, he also has not duties .. . With the girls to a matinee at Bellevue Hall. They danced and I was happy. My croquet party kept me busy all day. It was pleasant enough.... ... My peace I give unto you is a wonderful saying. What peace have most of us to give each other? But Christ has given peace to the world, peace at least as an ideal object, to be ever sought, though never fully attained. September 10.... Read Kant on state rights. According to him, wars of conquest are allowable only in a state of nature, not in a state of peace (which is not to be attained without a compact whose necessity is supreme and whose obligations are sacred). So Napoleon's crusade against the constituted authority of the European republic was without logical justification,--which accounts for the speedy downfall of his empire. What he accomplished had only the subjective justification of his genius and his
. On April 27 she heard of Wilkes Booth's deathshot on refusing to give himself up — the best thing that could have happened to himself and his family ; and wrote a second poem entitled Pardon, embodying her second and permanent thought on the subject: Pains the sharp sentence the heart in whose wrath it was uttered, Now thou art cold; Vengeance, the headlong, and Justice, with purpose close mut- tered, Loosen their hold, etc. Brief entries note the closing events of the war. May 13. Worked much on Essay. ... In the evening said to Laura: Jeff Davis will be taken tomorrow. Was so strongly impressed with the thought that I wanted to say it to Chev, but thought it was too silly. May 14. The first thing I heard in the morning was the news of the capture of Jeff Davis. This made me think of my preluding the night before.... Other things beside essays demanded work in these days. The great struggle was now over, and with it the long strain on heart and nerve, culmin
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