hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Julia Ward Howe 173 7 Browse Search
Diva Julia 152 0 Browse Search
Newport (Rhode Island, United States) 135 1 Browse Search
Samuel Ward 117 5 Browse Search
Oak Glen (New Jersey, United States) 110 0 Browse Search
Villa Julia 108 0 Browse Search
Jesus Christ 106 0 Browse Search
Charles Sumner 92 2 Browse Search
Julia Ward 77 1 Browse Search
Battle Hymn 74 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1. Search the whole document.

Found 119 total hits in 70 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7
October 6th (search for this): chapter 10
Tuckermans, and Laura. I see no outlook before me. So many fields for activity, but for passivity, which seems incumbent upon me, only uselessness, obscurity, deterioration. Some effort I must make. Many efforts were impending, though not precisely in the direction contemplated. First, a new abode must be found for the winter, as the owners of 13 Chestnut Street claimed it for themselves. She and the Doctor added house-hunting to their other burdens, and found it a heavy one. On October 6 she writes:-- Much excited about plans and prospects. Chev has bought the house in Boylston Place. No. 19. God grant it may be for the best. Determine to have classes in philosophy, and to ask a reasonable price for my tickets ... The Sunday's devotion without the week's thought and use is a spire without a meeting-house. It leaps upward, but crowns and covers nothing. I have too often set down the moral weight I have to carry, and frisked around it. But the voice now tell
April 15th (search for this): chapter 10
ut — shop windows decorated --processions in the street. All friends meet and shake hands. On the newspaper bulletins such placards as Gloria in excelsis Deo, Thanks be to God! We all call it the greatest day of our lives. Apples, half-peck, .50. That week was one of joy and thankfulness for all. Thursday was Fast Day; she went to church to fatigue Satan. Afterwards made a visit to Mrs. who did not seem to have tired her devil out. The joy bells were soon to be silenced. Saturday, April 15, was A black day in history, though outwardly most fair. President Lincoln was assassinated in his box at the theatre, last evening, by J. Wilkes Booth. This atrocious act, which was consummated in a very theatrical manner, is enough to ruin not the Booth family alone, but the theatrical profession. Since my Sammy's death, nothing has happened that has given me so much personal pain as this event. The city is paralyzed. But we can only work on, and trust in God. Our father's
er second and permanent thought on the subject: Pains the sharp sentence the heart in whose wrath it was uttered, Now thou art cold; Vengeance, the headlong, and Justice, with purpose close mut- tered, Loosen their hold, etc. Brief entries note the closing events of the war. May 13. Worked much on Essay. ... In the evening said to Laura: Jeff Davis will be taken tomorrow. Was so strongly impressed with the thought that I wanted to say it to Chev, but thought it was too silly. May 14. The first thing I heard in the morning was the news of the capture of Jeff Davis. This made me think of my preluding the night before.... Other things beside essays demanded work in these days. The great struggle was now over, and with it the long strain on heart and nerve, culminating in the tragic emotion of the past weeks. The inevitable reaction set in. Her whole nature cried out for play, and play meant work. Working all day for the Girls' Party, to-morrow evening. Got only a
April 19th (search for this): chapter 10
us down to hear the news, come vividly before us to-day, one of the clearest impressions of our youth. Our mother went with him next day to hear Governor Andrew's official announcement of the murder to the Legislature, and heard with deep emotion his quotation from MacBETHeth :-- Besides, this Duncan Hath borne his faculties so meek, hath been So clear in his great office, that his virtues Will plead like angels, trumpet-tongued, against The deep damnation of his taking-off, etc. Wednesday, April 19, was:-- The day of President Lincoln's funeral. A sad, disconnected day. I could not work, but strolled around to see the houses, variously draped in black and white. Went to Bartol's church, not knowing of a service at our own. Bartol's remarks were tender and pathetic. I was pleased to have heard them. Wrote some verses about the President — pretty good, perhaps,--scratching the last nearly in the dark, just before bedtime. This is the poem called Parricide. It begin
November 3rd (search for this): chapter 10
mn? When I told them that I was, they seemed much pleased. This I felt to be a great honor. The next day again she is harassed with correcting proofs and furnishing copy. Ran to Bartol for a little help, which he gave me. The Reverend C. A. Bartol was our next-door neighbor in Chestnut Street, a most kind and friendly one. His venerable figure, wrapped in a wide cloak, walking always in the middle of the road (we never knew why he eschewed the sidewalk), is one of the pleasant memories of Chestnut Street. We were now to leave that beloved street; a sorrowful flitting it was. Friday, November 3. Moving all day. This is my last writing in this dear house, No. 13 Chestnut Street, where I have had three years of good work, social and family enjoyment. Here I enjoyed my dear Sammy for six happy months — here I mourned long and bitterly for him. Here I read my six lectures on Practical Ethics. Some of my best days have been passed in this house. God be thanked for the same!
is time there was some question of selling Lawton's Valley for economic reasons. The exigency passed, but the following words show the depth of her feeling on the subject: If I have any true philosophy, any sincere religion, these must support me under the privation of the Valley. I feel this, and resolve to do well, but nature will suffer. That place has been my confidante,--my bosom friend,--intimate to me as no human being ever will be — dear and comforting also to my children.... June 11 ....Thought of a good text for a sermon, In the world ye shall have tribulation, the scope being to show that our tribulation, if we try to do well, is in the world, our refuge and comfort in the church. Thought of starting a society in Newport for the practice of sacred music, availing ourselves of the summer musicians and the possible aid of such ladies as Miss Reed, etc., for solos. Such an enterprise would be humanizing, and would supply a better object than the empty reunions of fash
ston Place. No. 19. God grant it may be for the best. Determine to have classes in philosophy, and to ask a reasonable price for my tickets ... The Sunday's devotion without the week's thought and use is a spire without a meeting-house. It leaps upward, but crowns and covers nothing. I have too often set down the moral weight I have to carry, and frisked around it. But the voice now tells me that I must bear it to the end, or lose it forever. The move to Boylston Place was in November. Early in the month a frisking took place, with amusing results. Our mother went with Governor and Mrs. Andrew and a gay party to Barnstable for the annual festival and ball. The Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company acted as escort, and — according to custom — the band of the Company furnished the music. For some reason — the townspeople thought because the pretty girls were all engaged beforehand for the dance — the officer in command stopped the music at twelve o'clock, to the gr
January 23rd (search for this): chapter 10
sent the audience into convulsions of laughter.--This was one of the carryings-on of the Brain Club. After another such occasion our mother writes:-- Very weary and aching a little. I must keep out of these tomfooleries, though they have their uses. They are much better than some other social entertainments, as after all they present some aesthetic points of interest. They are better than scandal, gluttony, or wild dancing. But the artists and I have still better things to do. January 23. It is always legitimate to wish to rise above one's self, never above others. In this, however, as in other things, we must remember the maxim: Natura nil facit per saltum. All true rising must be gradual and laborious, in such wise that the men of tomorrow shall look down almost imperceptibly upon the men of to-day. All sudden elevations are either imaginary or factitious. If you had not a kingly mind before our coronation, no crown will make a king of you. The true king is somewhere
April 27th (search for this): chapter 10
t our own. Bartol's remarks were tender and pathetic. I was pleased to have heard them. Wrote some verses about the President — pretty good, perhaps,--scratching the last nearly in the dark, just before bedtime. This is the poem called Parricide. It begins:-- O'er the warrior gauntlet grim Late the silken glove we drew, Bade the watch-fires slacken dim In the dawn's auspicious hue. Staid the armed heel; Still the clanging steel; Joys unwonted thrilled the silence through. On April 27 she heard of Wilkes Booth's deathshot on refusing to give himself up — the best thing that could have happened to himself and his family ; and wrote a second poem entitled Pardon, embodying her second and permanent thought on the subject: Pains the sharp sentence the heart in whose wrath it was uttered, Now thou art cold; Vengeance, the headlong, and Justice, with purpose close mut- tered, Loosen their hold, etc. Brief entries note the closing events of the war. May 13. Worked m
e is neither male nor female, is a good sentence. Paul did not carry this out in his church discipline, yet, one sees, he felt it in his religious contemplation. I feel that a woman's whole moral responsibility is lowered by the fact that she must never obey a transcendent command of conscience. Man can give her nothing to take the place of this. It is the divine right of the human soul. The fatigue and excitement of the Festival had to be paid for: the inevitable reaction set in. June 3. Decidedly I have spleen in these days. Throughout my whole body, I feel a mingled restlessness and feebleness, as if the nerves were irritated, and the muscles powerless. I feel puzzled, too, about the worth of what I have been doing for nearly three years past. There is no one to help me in these matters. I determine still to work on and hope on. Much of the work of every life is done in the dark. Again: Spleen to-day, and utter discouragement. The wind is east, and this gives me t
1 2 3 4 5 6 7