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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1. Search the whole document.

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March 10th (search for this): chapter 10
Played all last evening for Laura's company to dance. My heart flutters to-day. It is a feeling unknown to me until lately. Now, Laura would have gone barefoot in snow to save her mother pain or fatigue; yet she has no recollection of ever questioning the inevitability of Mamma's playing for all youthful dancing. Grown-up parties were different; for them there were hired musicians, who made inferior music; but for the frolics of the early 'teens, who should play except Mamma ? On March 10, she writes: I have now been too long in my study. I must break out into real life, and learn some more of its lessons. Two days later a lesson began: I stay from church to-day to take care of Maud, who is quite unwell. This is a sacrifice, although I am bound and glad to make it. But I shall miss the church all the week. The child became so ill that all pursuits had to be given up in the care of her. The Journal gives a minute account of this illness, and of the remedies used, amo
ften torn between the two, in the main she gave free rein to both, trusting the issue to God. The winter of 1864-65 was an arduous one. She was writing new philosophical essays, and reading them before various circles of friends. The larger audience which she craved was not for the moment attainable. She was studying deeply, reading Latin by way of relaxation, going somewhat into society (Julia and Florence being now of the dancing age), and entertaining a good deal in a quiet way. In February she writes: Much tormented by interruptions. Could not get five quiet minutes at a time. Everybody torments me with every smallest errand. And I am trying to study philosophy! Probably we were troublesome children and made more noise than we should. Her accurate ear for music was often a source of distress to her, as one of us can witness, an indolent child who neglected her practising. As this child drummed over her scales, the door of the upstairs study would open, and a clear voi
August 23rd (search for this): chapter 10
which secures universal liberty. I feel quite disheartened when I compare this summer with the last. I was so happy and hopeful in writing my three Essays and thought fhey should open such a vista of usefulness to me, and of good to others. But the opposition of my family has made it almost impossible for me to make the use intended of them. My health has not allowed me to continue to produce so much. I feel saddened and doubtful of the value of what I have done or can do. .. . August 23. .... Rights and duties are inseparable in human beings. God has rights without duties. Men have rights and duties. If a slave have not rights, he also has not duties .. . With the girls to a matinee at Bellevue Hall. They danced and I was happy. My croquet party kept me busy all day. It was pleasant enough.... ... My peace I give unto you is a wonderful saying. What peace have most of us to give each other? But Christ has given peace to the world, peace at least as an ideal
l before Richmond. Patriotism and philosophy together ruled our mother's life in these days; the former more apparent in her daily walk among us, the latter in the quiet hours with her Journal. The Journal for 1865 is much fuller than that of 1864; the record of events is more regular, and we find more and more reflection, meditation, and speculation. The influence of Kant is apparent; the entries become largely notes of study, to take final shape in lectures and essays. A morning visit of solitude and study lay on her with twofold poignancy. She went through life in double harness, thought and feeling abreast; though often torn between the two, in the main she gave free rein to both, trusting the issue to God. The winter of 1864-65 was an arduous one. She was writing new philosophical essays, and reading them before various circles of friends. The larger audience which she craved was not for the moment attainable. She was studying deeply, reading Latin by way of relaxa
th Grant and Lee in their long duel before Richmond. Patriotism and philosophy together ruled our mother's life in these days; the former more apparent in her daily walk among us, the latter in the quiet hours with her Journal. The Journal for 1865 is much fuller than that of 1864; the record of events is more regular, and we find more and more reflection, meditation, and speculation. The influence of Kant is apparent; the entries become largely notes of study, to take final shape in lectusolitude and study lay on her with twofold poignancy. She went through life in double harness, thought and feeling abreast; though often torn between the two, in the main she gave free rein to both, trusting the issue to God. The winter of 1864-65 was an arduous one. She was writing new philosophical essays, and reading them before various circles of friends. The larger audience which she craved was not for the moment attainable. She was studying deeply, reading Latin by way of relaxation
t ethical work which contains such powerful moral illustration and instruction. James Freeman [Clarke] does not think much of Sam's book, probably not as well as it deserves. But the knowledge of Sam's personality is the light behind the transparency in all that he does. Lyrical Ventures, by Samuel Ward. These were the closing months of the Civil War. All hearts were lifted up in thankfulness that the end was near. She speaks of it seldom, but her few words are significant. Monday, April 3.... Richmond was taken this morning. Laus Deo On April 10, after Maud's boots, $3.00, vegetables, .12, bread, .04, we read, Ribbons for victory, .40. To-day we have the news of Lee's surrender with the whole remnant of his army. The city is alive with people. All flags hung out — shop windows decorated --processions in the street. All friends meet and shake hands. On the newspaper bulletins such placards as Gloria in excelsis Deo, Thanks be to God! We all call it the grea
April 10th (search for this): chapter 10
d instruction. James Freeman [Clarke] does not think much of Sam's book, probably not as well as it deserves. But the knowledge of Sam's personality is the light behind the transparency in all that he does. Lyrical Ventures, by Samuel Ward. These were the closing months of the Civil War. All hearts were lifted up in thankfulness that the end was near. She speaks of it seldom, but her few words are significant. Monday, April 3.... Richmond was taken this morning. Laus Deo On April 10, after Maud's boots, $3.00, vegetables, .12, bread, .04, we read, Ribbons for victory, .40. To-day we have the news of Lee's surrender with the whole remnant of his army. The city is alive with people. All flags hung out — shop windows decorated --processions in the street. All friends meet and shake hands. On the newspaper bulletins such placards as Gloria in excelsis Deo, Thanks be to God! We all call it the greatest day of our lives. Apples, half-peck, .50. That week wa
music is the most expensive of the fine arts. It uses up the whole man more than the other arts do, and builds him up less. It is more passional, less intellectual, than the other arts. Its mastery is simple and absolute, while that of the other arts is so complex as to involve a larger sphere of thought and reflection. I have observed the faces of this orchestra just disbanded. Their average is considerably above the ordinary one. But they have probably more talent than thought. On May 31 we find a significant entry. The evening before she had attended the Unitarian Convention, and heard much tolerable speaking, but nothing of any special value or importance. She now writes:-- I really suffered last evening from the crowd of things which I wished to say, and which, at one word of command, would have flashed into life and, I think, into eloquence. It is by a fine use of natural logic that the Quaker denomination allows women to speak, under the pressure of religious conv
May, 1865 AD (search for this): chapter 10
y. The lists of men and women accepting and declining were balanced by my daughter F. with amusing anxiety.... The two sexes are now neck and neck. Dear little Maud was in high glee over every male acceptance. Out of all this hubbub got a precious forty-five minutes with Kant.... The party proved very gay and pleasant. Now came a more important event: the Musical Festival celebrating the close of the war, which was given by the Handel and Haydn Society, at its semi-centennial, in May, 1865. Our mother sang alto in the chorus. The Journal records daily, sometimes semi-daily, rehearsals and performances, Kant squeezed to the wall, and getting with difficulty his daily hour or half-hour. Mendelssohn's Hymn of praise and Elijah ; Haydn's Creation, Handel's Messiah and Israel in Egypt ; she sang in them all. Here is a sample Festival day:-- Attended morning rehearsal, afternoon concert, and sang in the evening. We gave Israel in Egypt and Mendelssohn's Hymn of Praise.
good text for a sermon, In the world ye shall have tribulation, the scope being to show that our tribulation, if we try to do well, is in the world, our refuge and comfort in the church. Thought of starting a society in Newport for the practice of sacred music, availing ourselves of the summer musicians and the possible aid of such ladies as Miss Reed, etc., for solos. Such an enterprise would be humanizing, and would supply a better object than the empty reunions of fashion .... Wednesday, June 21. Attended the meeting at Faneuil Hall, for the consideration of reconstruction of the Southern States. Dana made a statement to the effect that voting was a civic, not a natural, right, and built up the propriety of negro suffrage on the basis first of military right, then of duty to the negro, this being the only mode of enabling him to protect himself against his late master. His treatment was intended to be exhaustive, and was able, though cold and conceited. Beecher tumbled up o
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