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William Hunt (search for this): chapter 10
er to criticise it for Chev's pamphlet ; Dr. Howe raised the money for this statue. meets William Hunt, who praises its simplicity and parental character; and Charles Sumner, who tells her it lookstill appears to me as my superior. A little nervous about my reading. Reached Mrs. [Richard] Hunt's at twelve. Saw the sweet little boy. Mrs. Hunt very kind and cordial. At one Mr. Hunt led me Mrs. Hunt very kind and cordial. At one Mr. Hunt led me to the studio which I found well filled, my two aunts in the front row, to my great surprise; Bancroft, too, quite near me. I shortened the essay somewhat. It was well heard and received. AfterwardMr. Hunt led me to the studio which I found well filled, my two aunts in the front row, to my great surprise; Bancroft, too, quite near me. I shortened the essay somewhat. It was well heard and received. Afterwards I read my poem called Philosophy, and was urged to recite my Battle Hymn, which I did. I was much gratified by the kind reception I met with and the sight of many friends of my youth. A most pleasant lunch afterwards at Mrs. Hunt's, with Tweedys, Tuckermans, and Laura. I see no outlook before me. So many fields for activity, but for passivity, which seems incumbent upon me, only uselessnes
G. F. Handel (search for this): chapter 10
with Kant.... The party proved very gay and pleasant. Now came a more important event: the Musical Festival celebrating the close of the war, which was given by the Handel and Haydn Society, at its semi-centennial, in May, 1865. Our mother sang alto in the chorus. The Journal records daily, sometimes semi-daily, rehearsals and performances, Kant squeezed to the wall, and getting with difficulty his daily hour or half-hour. Mendelssohn's Hymn of praise and Elijah ; Haydn's Creation, Handel's Messiah and Israel in Egypt ; she sang in them all. Here is a sample Festival day:-- Attended morning rehearsal, afternoon concert, and sang in the evening. We gave Israel in Egypt and Mendelssohn's Hymn of Praise. I got a short reading of Kant, which helped me through the day. But so much music is more than human nerves can respond to with pleasure. This confirms my belief in the limited power of our sensibilities in the direction of pure enjoyment. The singing in the choruses f
Immanuel Kant (search for this): chapter 10
meditation, and speculation. The influence of Kant is apparent; the entries become largely notes oary Dorr's, to consult about the Charade. Read Kant and wrote as usual. Spent the afternoon in gete her, could not get it right: Mamma, studying Kant upstairs behind closed doors, knew what the notrrow evening. Got only a very short reading of Kant, and of Tyndall. Tea with the Bartols. Talk ws hubbub got a precious forty-five minutes with Kant.... The party proved very gay and pleasant. etimes semi-daily, rehearsals and performances, Kant squeezed to the wall, and getting with difficulohn's Hymn of Praise. I got a short reading of Kant, which helped me through the day. But so much m and Godless all day, having taken my volume of Kant back to the Athenaeum for the yearly rearrangemhook off fatigue and was herself again, reading Kant and Livy, teaching the children, and gathering never fully attained. September 10.... Read Kant on state rights. According to him, wars of con[1 more...]
ning A lesson none ask to hear, My life writeth out thy sentence Divinely just and dear. J. W. H. The war was nearly over, and all hearts were with Grant and Lee in their long duel before Richmond. Patriotism and philosophy together ruled our mother's life in these days; the former more apparent in her daily walk among us, have adorned any stage. The book of the Oratorio was a simple rhyme of Boston authorship. Abigail Lord, Of her own accord, Went down to see her sister, When Jason Lee, As brisk as a flea, He hopped right up and kissed her. With these words, an umbrella, and a chair held before him like a violoncello, Mr. Abbott gave a trun this morning. Laus Deo On April 10, after Maud's boots, $3.00, vegetables, .12, bread, .04, we read, Ribbons for victory, .40. To-day we have the news of Lee's surrender with the whole remnant of his army. The city is alive with people. All flags hung out — shop windows decorated --processions in the street. All frie
Julia Ward Howe (search for this): chapter 10
ng — a long and pleasant visit. He is a very sweet-hearted man, and does not grow old. The Musical Festival had not yet exacted full arrears of payment; she was too weary even to enjoy the Valley at first; but after a few days of its beloved seclusion she shook off fatigue and was herself again, reading Kant and Livy, teaching the children, and gathering mussels on the beach. She flits up to town to see the new statue of Horace Mann, in order to criticise it for Chev's pamphlet ; Dr. Howe raised the money for this statue. meets William Hunt, who praises its simplicity and parental character; and Charles Sumner, who tells her it looks better on a nearer view. The day after--we abode in the Valley, when three detachments of company tumbled in upon us, to wit, Colonel Higginson and Mrs. McKay, the Tweedys and John Field, and the Gulstons. All were friendly. Only on my speaking of the rudeness occasionally shown me by a certain lady, Mrs. Tweedy said: But that was in the pr
Very weary and aching a little. I must keep out of these tomfooleries, though they have their uses. They are much better than some other social entertainments, as after all they present some aesthetic points of interest. They are better than scandal, gluttony, or wild dancing. But the artists and I have still better things to do. January 23. It is always legitimate to wish to rise above one's self, never above others. In this, however, as in other things, we must remember the maxim: Natura nil facit per saltum. All true rising must be gradual and laborious, in such wise that the men of tomorrow shall look down almost imperceptibly upon the men of to-day. All sudden elevations are either imaginary or factitious. If you had not a kingly mind before our coronation, no crown will make a king of you. The true king is somewhere, starving or hiding, very like. For the true value which the counterfeit represents exists somewhere. The world has much dodging about to produce the re
Jerry Abbott (search for this): chapter 10
l. Spent the afternoon in getting up my costumes for the Charade. The word was Au-thor-ship.... Authorship was expressed by my appearing as a great composer, Jerry Abbott performing my Oratorio — a very comical thing, indeed. The whole was a success. No one who saw the Oratorio can forget it. Mr. Abbott, our neighbor in ChesMr. Abbott, our neighbor in Chestnut Street, was a comedian who would have adorned any stage. The book of the Oratorio was a simple rhyme of Boston authorship. Abigail Lord, Of her own accord, Went down to see her sister, When Jason Lee, As brisk as a flea, He hopped right up and kissed her. With these words, an umbrella, and a chair held before him like a violoncello, Mr. Abbott gave a truly Handelian performance. Fugue and counterpoint, first violin and bass tuba, solo and full chorus, all were rendered with a verve and spirit which sent the audience into convulsions of laughter.--This was one of the carryings-on of the Brain Club. After another such occasion our mother writ
Joseph Haydn (search for this): chapter 10
orty-five minutes with Kant.... The party proved very gay and pleasant. Now came a more important event: the Musical Festival celebrating the close of the war, which was given by the Handel and Haydn Society, at its semi-centennial, in May, 1865. Our mother sang alto in the chorus. The Journal records daily, sometimes semi-daily, rehearsals and performances, Kant squeezed to the wall, and getting with difficulty his daily hour or half-hour. Mendelssohn's Hymn of praise and Elijah ; Haydn's Creation, Handel's Messiah and Israel in Egypt ; she sang in them all. Here is a sample Festival day:-- Attended morning rehearsal, afternoon concert, and sang in the evening. We gave Israel in Egypt and Mendelssohn's Hymn of Praise. I got a short reading of Kant, which helped me through the day. But so much music is more than human nerves can respond to with pleasure. This confirms my belief in the limited power of our sensibilities in the direction of pure enjoyment. The singin
William Tyndall (search for this): chapter 10
nating in the tragic emotion of the past weeks. The inevitable reaction set in. Her whole nature cried out for play, and play meant work. Working all day for the Girls' Party, to-morrow evening. Got only a very short reading of Kant, and of Tyndall. Tea with the Bartols. Talk with [E. P.] Whipple, who furiously attacked Tacitus. Bartol and I, who know a good deal more about him, made a strong fight in his behalf. Working all day for the Party. The lists of men and women accepting anLincoln's death.... Duty depends on an objective, happiness upon a subjective, sense. The first is capable of a general and particular definition, the second is not. In the afternoon mended Harry's shirt, finished Maud's skirt, read Livy and Tyndall, and played croquet, which made me very cross. Exhumed my French story and began its termination. Mended a sheet badly torn. After a long list of purchases-- Worked like a dog all day. Went in town, running about to pick up all the art
the night before.... Other things beside essays demanded work in these days. The great struggle was now over, and with it the long strain on heart and nerve, culminating in the tragic emotion of the past weeks. The inevitable reaction set in. Her whole nature cried out for play, and play meant work. Working all day for the Girls' Party, to-morrow evening. Got only a very short reading of Kant, and of Tyndall. Tea with the Bartols. Talk with [E. P.] Whipple, who furiously attacked Tacitus. Bartol and I, who know a good deal more about him, made a strong fight in his behalf. Working all day for the Party. The lists of men and women accepting and declining were balanced by my daughter F. with amusing anxiety.... The two sexes are now neck and neck. Dear little Maud was in high glee over every male acceptance. Out of all this hubbub got a precious forty-five minutes with Kant.... The party proved very gay and pleasant. Now came a more important event: the Musical F
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