hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Julia Ward Howe 173 7 Browse Search
Diva Julia 152 0 Browse Search
Newport (Rhode Island, United States) 135 1 Browse Search
Samuel Ward 117 5 Browse Search
Oak Glen (New Jersey, United States) 110 0 Browse Search
Villa Julia 108 0 Browse Search
Jesus Christ 106 0 Browse Search
Charles Sumner 92 2 Browse Search
Julia Ward 77 1 Browse Search
Battle Hymn 74 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1. Search the whole document.

Found 182 total hits in 109 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ...
Christy Evangelides (search for this): chapter 12
l of Corfii. At Corfu a Turkish pacha came on board with his harem, to our lively interest. The Journal gives every observable detail of the somewhat squalid manage, from the pacha's lilac trousers down to the dress of his son and heir, a singularly dirty baby. She remarks that An Irish servant's child in Boston, got up for Sunday, looks far cleaner and better. The pacha looked indolent and good-natured, and sent coffee to her before she disembarked at Syra. Here she was met by Mr. Evangelides, the Christy of her childhood, the Greek boy befriended by her father. He was now a prosperous man in middle life, full of affectionate remembrance of the family at 16 Bond Street, and of gratitude to dear Mr. Ward. He welcomed her most cordially, and introduced her not only to the beauties of Syra, but to its principal inhabitants, the governor of the Cyclades, the archbishop, and Doctor Hahn, the scientist and antiquary. She conversed with the archbishop in German. He deplored t
J. F. C. Took (search for this): chapter 12
Drs. Holmes and Howe, Whipple and Fields, T. B. Aldrich and I don't know who. Coffin covered with flowers. Appearance of the family interesting: the widow bowed and closely shrouded. Thus ends a man of perhaps first-rate genius, ruined by the adoption of an utterly frivolous standard of labor and of life. George IV and Bulwer have to answer for some of these failures. My tea party was delightful, friendly, not fashionable. We had a good talk, and a lovely, familiar time. Heard J. F. C. Took my dear Francesco [Marion Crawford] at his request, with great pleasure, feeling that he would find there a living Jesus immortal in influence, instead of the perfumed and embalmed mummy of orthodoxy.... Of that which is not clear one cannot have a clear idea. My reading in Fichte to-day is of the most confused. February 7. Chev came dancing in to tell me that Flossy is engaged to David Hall. His delight knew no bounds. I am also pleased, for David is of excellent character and
N. P. Willis (search for this): chapter 12
to seize the Suliote blade, speaks again with the voice of his age in defence of the cause of his youth. Thirty-seven thousand dollars were raised for Crete, and in March, 1867, Dr. Howe sailed again for Greece on an errand of mercy. The Journal gives an outline of the busy winter:-- The post is the poor man's valet.... January 12. A busy and studious day; had the neighbors in after tea. Want clamors for relief, but calls for cure, which begins in discipline .... January 24. N. P. Willis's funeral. Chev came home quite suddenly and asked me to go with him to the church, St. Paul's. The pallbearers were Longfellow and Lowell, Drs. Holmes and Howe, Whipple and Fields, T. B. Aldrich and I don't know who. Coffin covered with flowers. Appearance of the family interesting: the widow bowed and closely shrouded. Thus ends a man of perhaps first-rate genius, ruined by the adoption of an utterly frivolous standard of labor and of life. George IV and Bulwer have to answer for so
Ollendorff (search for this): chapter 12
the poetry of their own conception. Poor old age! poor old columns! There was a colony of Cretan refugees at Nauplia, another at Argos, both in dire need of food and clothing. The Doctor asked the Government for a steamer, and received the Parados, in which he promptly embarked with wife, daughters, and supplies, and sailed for Nauplia. The travelling library of this expedition was reduced to a copy of Machiavelli's Principe, a volume of Muir's Greece, and a Greek phrase-book on Ollendorff's principle. Our mother also took some worsted work, but she suffered such lively torment from the bites of mosquitoes and sand-fleas on her hands and wrists that she could make little use of this. To one recalling the anguish of this visitation, it seems amazing that she could even write in her Journal; indeed, the entries, though tolerably regular, are brief and condensed. June 24.... We arrived in the harbor of Nauplia by 7 P. M.... Crowd in the street. Bandit's head just cut off
thy Greek widow, who received us very ill. Heard there Mr. Ap Thomas, a Welsh harper who plays exceedingly well. The pleasure of hearing him scarcely compensated for Mrs.--'s want of politeness, which was probably not intentional. Saw there Sir Samuel and Lady Baker, the latter wore an amber satin tunic over a white dress, and a necklace of lion's teeth. April 5. Breakfast with Mr. Charles Dalrymple at 2 Clarges Street, where we met Mr. Grant Duff, Baron McKaye, and others. Tea at Lady Trevelyan's, where I was introduced to Dean Stanley of Westminster . .. and young Milman, son of the Reverend H. M. Lady Stanley was Lady Augusta Bruce, a great favorite of the Queen. Dined at Argyll Lodge, found the Duchess serene and friendly; the Duke seemed hard and sensible, Lord Lorne, the eldest son, very pleasant, and Hon. Charles Howard and son most amiable, with more breeding, I should say, than the Duke. Chev was the hero of this occasion; the Duchess always liked him. During this
Huntington (search for this): chapter 12
, in grief and wrong! Be thine the blessing of the years, The gift of faith, the crown of song. J. W. H. In January, 1867, a new note is sounded. In the evening attended meeting in behalf of Crete, at which Chev presided and spoke. Excellent as to matter, but always with a defective elocution, not sending his voice out. He was much and deservedly glorified by other speakers, and, indeed, his appearance on this occasion was most touching and interesting. Phillips was very fine; Huntington was careful, polished, and interesting. Andrew read the resolutions, with a splendid compliment to Chev. Some months before this, in August, 1866, the Cretans had risen against their Turkish oppressors, and made a valiant struggle for freedom. From the first the Doctor had been deeply interested in the insurrection: now, as reports came of the sufferings of the brave mountaineers, and of their women and children, who had been sent to the mainland for safety, he felt impelled to help t
J. N. Howe (search for this): chapter 12
dollars were raised for Crete, and in March, 1867, Dr. Howe sailed again for Greece on an errand of mercy. Thlbearers were Longfellow and Lowell, Drs. Holmes and Howe, Whipple and Fields, T. B. Aldrich and I don't know th some very pleasant and complimentary remarks on Dr. Howe and myself, introduced Mrs. Silsbee's farewell verm in absurdity:--Oh! who were the people you saw, Mrs. Howe, When you went where the Cretans were making a rows — Paraskevaides-- These were the people that saw Mrs. Howe When she went where the Cretans were making a row. Oh! what were the projects you made, Mrs. Howe, When you went where the Cretans were making a row? Emancipativer the banisters. These were the projects of good Mrs. Howe When she went where the Cretans were making a row. Oh! give us a specimen, dear Mrs. Howe, Of the Greek that you learned and are mistress of now. Potichomania —avors no Fenian. Such is the language that learned Mrs. Howe, In the speech of the Gods she is mistress of now.
Niccolo Machiavelli (search for this): chapter 12
he prose of modern design that we are startled at seeing them transfigured in the poetry of their own conception. Poor old age! poor old columns! There was a colony of Cretan refugees at Nauplia, another at Argos, both in dire need of food and clothing. The Doctor asked the Government for a steamer, and received the Parados, in which he promptly embarked with wife, daughters, and supplies, and sailed for Nauplia. The travelling library of this expedition was reduced to a copy of Machiavelli's Principe, a volume of Muir's Greece, and a Greek phrase-book on Ollendorff's principle. Our mother also took some worsted work, but she suffered such lively torment from the bites of mosquitoes and sand-fleas on her hands and wrists that she could make little use of this. To one recalling the anguish of this visitation, it seems amazing that she could even write in her Journal; indeed, the entries, though tolerably regular, are brief and condensed. June 24.... We arrived in the ha
oc wrought by Time and war upon monuments that should have been sacred. Speaking of the Parthenon, she exclaims:-- And Pericles caused it to be built; and this, his marble utterance, is now a lame sentence, with half its sense left out. ... Here is the Temple of Victory. Within are the basreliefs of the Victories arriving in the hurry of their glorious errands. Something so they tumbled in upon us when Sherman conquered the Carolinas, and Sheridan the Valley of the Shenandoah, when Lee surrendered, and the glad President went to Richmond. One of these Victories is untying her sandal, in token of permanent abiding. Yet all of them have trooped away long since, scared by the hideous havoc of barbarians. And the bas-reliefs, their marble shadows, have all been battered and mutilated into the saddest mockery of their original tradition. The statue of Wingless Victory, that stood in the little temple, has long been absent and unaccounted for. But the only Victory that the Pa
Sophia Whitwell (search for this): chapter 12
kind. She gave readings here and there in aid of the Cretans. Ran about much: saw Miss Rogers's deaf pupils at Mrs. Lamson's, very interesting.... For the first time in three days got a peep at Fichte. Finished Jesse's George the third. Went to Roxbury to read at Mrs. Harrington's for the benefit of the Cretans. It was a literary and musical entertainment. Tickets, one dollar. We made one hundred dollars. My poems were very kindly received. Afterwards, in great haste, to Sophia Whitwell's, This was evidently a meeting of the Brain Club. where I received a great ovation, all members greeting me most affectionately. Presently Mr. [Josiah] Quincy, with some very pleasant and complimentary remarks on Dr. Howe and myself, introduced Mrs. Silsbee's farewell verses to me, which were cordial and feeling. Afterwards I read my valedictory verses, strung together in a very headlong fashion, but just as well liked as though I had bestowed more care upon them. A bouquet of
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ...