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not have Christian elevation with heathen triviality. That moment showed me what a picture can do. I hope I shall remember it, though I do plead guilty of late to an extraordinary desire for finery of all sorts. It is as if I were going home to play the part of Princess in some great drama, which is not at all likely to be the case. Yet the same day she went to the beguinage and bought Flossy's wedding hdkf, 22 frc— lace scarf, 3 fr., piece of edging, 4 fr. Among the notabilities of Antwerp in those days was Charles Felu, the armless painter. He was to be seen every day in the Museum, copying the great masters with skill and fidelity. He interested the Doctor greatly, and the whole party made acquaintance with him. A letter from one of them describes the meeting with this singular man:-- As we were looking round at the pictures, I noticed a curious painting arrangement. There was a platform raised about a foot above the floor, with two stools, one in front of the other,
zons, whose palatial residence moved me not to envy. This seems an idle word, but I like to record my satisfaction in a simple, unencumbered life, without state of any kind, save my pleasant relations and my good position in my own country. Mrs. Benzon asked me to come alone to dinner in the evening. First, however, I called upon Arthur Mills at Hyde Park Gardens; then upon Mrs. Ambassadress Adams, who was quite cordial; then in frantic hurry home to dress. At Benzon's I met Robert BrowninBenzon's I met Robert Browning, a dear and sacred personage, dear for his own and his wife's sake. He sat next me at table and by and by spoke very kindly of my foolish verses Kenyon's Legacy, printed in Later Lyrics. about himself and E. B. B. I mean he spoke of them with magnanimity. Of course my present self would not publish, nor I hope write, anything of the kind, but I launched the arrow in the easy petulance of those days, more occupied with its force and polish than with its direction. To Lady Stanley's 5 o'cl
for Crete, and in March, 1867, Dr. Howe sailed again for Greece on an errand of mercy. The Journal gives an outline of the busy winter:-- The post is the poor man's valet.... January 12. A busy and studious day; had the neighbors in after tea. Want clamors for relief, but calls for cure, which begins in discipline .... January 24. N. P. Willis's funeral. Chev came home quite suddenly and asked me to go with him to the church, St. Paul's. The pallbearers were Longfellow and Lowell, Drs. Holmes and Howe, Whipple and Fields, T. B. Aldrich and I don't know who. Coffin covered with flowers. Appearance of the family interesting: the widow bowed and closely shrouded. Thus ends a man of perhaps first-rate genius, ruined by the adoption of an utterly frivolous standard of labor and of life. George IV and Bulwer have to answer for some of these failures. My tea party was delightful, friendly, not fashionable. We had a good talk, and a lovely, familiar time. Heard J. F. C.
Fanny Longfellow (search for this): chapter 12
dollars were raised for Crete, and in March, 1867, Dr. Howe sailed again for Greece on an errand of mercy. The Journal gives an outline of the busy winter:-- The post is the poor man's valet.... January 12. A busy and studious day; had the neighbors in after tea. Want clamors for relief, but calls for cure, which begins in discipline .... January 24. N. P. Willis's funeral. Chev came home quite suddenly and asked me to go with him to the church, St. Paul's. The pallbearers were Longfellow and Lowell, Drs. Holmes and Howe, Whipple and Fields, T. B. Aldrich and I don't know who. Coffin covered with flowers. Appearance of the family interesting: the widow bowed and closely shrouded. Thus ends a man of perhaps first-rate genius, ruined by the adoption of an utterly frivolous standard of labor and of life. George IV and Bulwer have to answer for some of these failures. My tea party was delightful, friendly, not fashionable. We had a good talk, and a lovely, familiar time.
a short time to Mrs.--, a very wealthy Greek widow, who received us very ill. Heard there Mr. Ap Thomas, a Welsh harper who plays exceedingly well. The pleasure of hearing him scarcely compensated for Mrs.--'s want of politeness, which was probably not intentional. Saw there Sir Samuel and Lady Baker, the latter wore an amber satin tunic over a white dress, and a necklace of lion's teeth. April 5. Breakfast with Mr. Charles Dalrymple at 2 Clarges Street, where we met Mr. Grant Duff, Baron McKaye, and others. Tea at Lady Trevelyan's, where I was introduced to Dean Stanley of Westminster . .. and young Milman, son of the Reverend H. M. Lady Stanley was Lady Augusta Bruce, a great favorite of the Queen. Dined at Argyll Lodge, found the Duchess serene and friendly; the Duke seemed hard and sensible, Lord Lorne, the eldest son, very pleasant, and Hon. Charles Howard and son most amiable, with more breeding, I should say, than the Duke. Chev was the hero of this occasion; the Duches
Pallas Athenae Aun (search for this): chapter 12
ople you saw, Mrs. Howe, When you went where the Cretans were making a row? Kalopathaki — Rodocanachi-- Paparipopoulos — Anagnostopoulos-- Nicolaides — Paraskevaides-- These were the people that saw Mrs. Howe When she went where the Cretans were making a row. Oh! what were the projects you made, Mrs. Howe, When you went where the Cretans were making a row? Emancipation — civilization — redintegration of a great nation, Paying no taxes, grinding no axes- Flinging the Ministers over the banisters. These were the projects of good Mrs. Howe When she went where the Cretans were making a row. Oh! give us a specimen, dear Mrs. Howe, Of the Greek that you learned and are mistress of now. Potichomania — Mesopotamia. Tatterdemalion — episcopalian-- Megalotherium — monster inferium-- Scoulevon — auctrion — infant phenomenon. Kyrie ticamete — what's your calamity? Pallas Athenae Aun, Favors no Fenian. Such is the language that learned Mrs. Howe, In the speech of the Gods sh
es — they have nothing to say. Greece was before her. On June 17 the Journal says: Acroceraunian mountains, shore of Albania. Nothing strikes me — I have been struck till I am stricken down. Sirocco and head wind — vessel laboring with the sea, I with Guizot's Meditations, which also have some head wind in them. They seem to me inconclusive in statement and commonplace in thought, yet presenting some facts of interest. A little before 2 P. M. we passed Fano, the island on which Calypso could not console herself, and no wonder. At 2 we enter the channel of Corfii. At Corfu a Turkish pacha came on board with his harem, to our lively interest. The Journal gives every observable detail of the somewhat squalid manage, from the pacha's lilac trousers down to the dress of his son and heir, a singularly dirty baby. She remarks that An Irish servant's child in Boston, got up for Sunday, looks far cleaner and better. The pacha looked indolent and good-natured, and sent cof<
of his son and heir, a singularly dirty baby. She remarks that An Irish servant's child in Boston, got up for Sunday, looks far cleaner and better. The pacha looked indolent and good-natured, and sent coffee to her before she disembarked at Syra. Here she was met by Mr. Evangelides, the Christy of her childhood, the Greek boy befriended by her father. He was now a prosperous man in middle life, full of affectionate remembrance of the family at 16 Bond Street, and of gratitude to dear Mr. Ward. He welcomed her most cordially, and introduced her not only to the beauties of Syra, but to its principal inhabitants, the governor of the Cyclades, the archbishop, and Doctor Hahn, the scientist and antiquary. She conversed with the archbishop in German. He deplored the absence of a state religion in America. I told him that the progress of religion in our country seemed to establish the fact that society attains the best religious culture through the greatest religious liberty. He
Augusta Bruce (search for this): chapter 12
m scarcely compensated for Mrs.--'s want of politeness, which was probably not intentional. Saw there Sir Samuel and Lady Baker, the latter wore an amber satin tunic over a white dress, and a necklace of lion's teeth. April 5. Breakfast with Mr. Charles Dalrymple at 2 Clarges Street, where we met Mr. Grant Duff, Baron McKaye, and others. Tea at Lady Trevelyan's, where I was introduced to Dean Stanley of Westminster . .. and young Milman, son of the Reverend H. M. Lady Stanley was Lady Augusta Bruce, a great favorite of the Queen. Dined at Argyll Lodge, found the Duchess serene and friendly; the Duke seemed hard and sensible, Lord Lorne, the eldest son, very pleasant, and Hon. Charles Howard and son most amiable, with more breeding, I should say, than the Duke. Chev was the hero of this occasion; the Duchess always liked him. During this brief week, the Doctor had been in close communication with the Greeks of London, who one and all were eager to welcome him, and to bid him
Luther Terry (search for this): chapter 12
on, very pleasant, and Hon. Charles Howard and son most amiable, with more breeding, I should say, than the Duke. Chev was the hero of this occasion; the Duchess always liked him. During this brief week, the Doctor had been in close communication with the Greeks of London, who one and all were eager to welcome him, and to bid him Godspeed on his errand. His business transacted, he felt that he must hurry on toward Greece. Some stay must be made in Rome, where our Aunt Louisa (now Mrs. Luther Terry) was anxiously expecting the party; but even this tie of affection and friendship could not keep the Doctor long from his quest. On May 1 he and Julia went to Greece, the others remaining for some weeks in Italy. Sixteen years had passed since our mother's last visit to Rome. She found some changes in the city, but more vital ones in herself. I left Rome, she says, after those days, with entire determination, but with infinite reluctance. America seemed the place of exile, Rom
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