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ith the high resolve and hardihood for which, but a few years before, she had been sighing: this was the woman who came to London in 1872, alone and unaided; who, standing before the Dark Tower of established Order and Precedent, might say with Childe Roland,-- Dauntless the slug horn to my lips I set, And blew. She spoke at the banquet of the Unitarian Association. The occasion was to me a memorable one. She hired the Freemasons' Tavern and preached there on five or six successive Sundays. My procedure was very simple,--a prayer, the reading of a hymn, and a discourse from a Scripture text.... The attendance was very good throughout, and I cherished the hope that I had sown some seed which would bear fruit hereafter. She was asked to address meetings in various parts of England, speaking in Birmingham, Manchester, Leeds, Bristol, Carlisle, with good acceptance. In Cambridge she talked with Professor J. R. Seeley, whom she found most sympathetic. She was everywhere we
January 20th (search for this): chapter 14
s of Women, in London, in the summer of 1872, in which undertaking the cooperation of all persons is earnestly invited. Before continuing the story of this peace crusade, we return to the Journal. The volume for 1871 is fragmentary, the entries mostly brief and far apart. Written and blank pages are alike significant of the movement going on in her mind, the steadily growing desire and resolve to dedicate her life, as her husband had dedicated his, to the highest needs of humanity. January 20. Have been ill all these days. Had a divine glimpse this day, between daylight and dusk, of something like this — a beautiful person splendidly dressed entering a theatre as I have often done with entire delight and forgetfulness of everything else, and the restraining hand of Christ holding me back in the outer darkness — the want and woe of the world, and saying, The true drama of life is here. Oh! that restraining hand had in it the true touch, communicating knowledge of human sorrow
d skill, the appointed givers of life speeding death and reaping the bitter fruit themselves! With this terrible picture before us, let no civilized nation from henceforth and forever admit or recognize the instrumentality of war as worthy of Christian society. Let the fact of human brotherhood be taught to the babe in his cradle, let it be taught to the despot on his throne. Let it be the basis and foundation of education and legislation, the bond of high and low, of rich and poor.... May 27. I am fifty-two years old this day and must regard this year as in some sense the best of my life. The great joy of the Peace Idea has unfolded itself to me.... I have got at better methods of working in the practical matters at which I do work, and believe more than ever in patience, labor, and sticking to one's own idea of work. Study, book-work, and solitary thinking and writing show us only one side of what we study. Practical life and intercourse with others supply the other side.
this in which the spirit of my desire may receive the form of his will. I must lecture this winter to earn some money and spread, I hope, some good doctrine... . Such was the beginning of her work for peace, which was to end only with her life. Disappointed in her hope of a world congress, she turned the current of her effort in a new direction. She would have a festival, a day which should be called Mothers' Day, and be devoted to the advocacy of peace doctrines. She chose the second day of June; for many years she and her friends and followers kept this day religiously, with sweet and tender observances which were unspeakably dear to her. In 1876 there was a great peace meeting in Philadelphia. The occasion is thus described by the Reverend Ada C. Bowles: There were delegates from France, Italy, and Germany, each with a burning desire to be heard, and all worth hearing, but none able to speak English. The audience looked to the anxious face of the President with sympathy
re text.... The attendance was very good throughout, and I cherished the hope that I had sown some seed which would bear fruit hereafter. She was asked to address meetings in various parts of England, speaking in Birmingham, Manchester, Leeds, Bristol, Carlisle, with good acceptance. In Cambridge she talked with Professor J. R. Seeley, whom she found most sympathetic. She was everywhere welcomed by thoughtful people, old friends and new, whether or no they sympathized with her quest. June 9. My first preaching in London. Worked pretty much all day at sermon, intending, not to read, but to talk it — for me, a difficult procedure. At 4.30 P. M. left off, but brain so tired that nothing in it. Subject, the kingdom of heaven.... Got a bad cup of tea -dressed (in my well-worn black silk) and went to the Drawing-Room at Freemasons' Tavern. God knows how I felt. Cast down but not forsaken. . . . I got through better than I feared I might. Felt the method to be the right one, speak
retty much all day at sermon, intending, not to read, but to talk it — for me, a difficult procedure. At 4.30 P. M. left off, but brain so tired that nothing in it. Subject, the kingdom of heaven.... Got a bad cup of tea -dressed (in my well-worn black silk) and went to the Drawing-Room at Freemasons' Tavern. God knows how I felt. Cast down but not forsaken. . . . I got through better than I feared I might. Felt the method to be the right one, speaking face to face and heart to heart. June 10. Small beer going out of fashion leaves women one occupation the less. Fools are still an institution; and will remain such. To suckle fools and chronicle small beer. Othello. June 16.... A good attendance in spite of the heat.... Agonized over my failure to come up to what I had designed to do in the discourse. June 18.... Saw the last of my dear friend E. Twisleton, who took me to the National Gallery, where we saw many precious gems of art.... At parting, he said: The good Fa
ven.... Got a bad cup of tea -dressed (in my well-worn black silk) and went to the Drawing-Room at Freemasons' Tavern. God knows how I felt. Cast down but not forsaken. . . . I got through better than I feared I might. Felt the method to be the right one, speaking face to face and heart to heart. June 10. Small beer going out of fashion leaves women one occupation the less. Fools are still an institution; and will remain such. To suckle fools and chronicle small beer. Othello. June 16.... A good attendance in spite of the heat.... Agonized over my failure to come up to what I had designed to do in the discourse. June 18.... Saw the last of my dear friend E. Twisleton, who took me to the National Gallery, where we saw many precious gems of art.... At parting, he said: The good Father above does not often give so great a pleasure as I have had in these meetings with you. Let me enshrine this charming and sincere word in my most precious recollection, from the man of si
Cast down but not forsaken. . . . I got through better than I feared I might. Felt the method to be the right one, speaking face to face and heart to heart. June 10. Small beer going out of fashion leaves women one occupation the less. Fools are still an institution; and will remain such. To suckle fools and chronicle small beer. Othello. June 16.... A good attendance in spite of the heat.... Agonized over my failure to come up to what I had designed to do in the discourse. June 18.... Saw the last of my dear friend E. Twisleton, who took me to the National Gallery, where we saw many precious gems of art.... At parting, he said: The good Father above does not often give so great a pleasure as I have had in these meetings with you. Let me enshrine this charming and sincere word in my most precious recollection, from the man of sixty-three to the woman of fifty-three. June 27. Left Leeds at 7 A. M., rising at 4.30 .... To Miss [Frances Power] Cobbe's, where met Lady
t.... Agonized over my failure to come up to what I had designed to do in the discourse. June 18.... Saw the last of my dear friend E. Twisleton, who took me to the National Gallery, where we saw many precious gems of art.... At parting, he said: The good Father above does not often give so great a pleasure as I have had in these meetings with you. Let me enshrine this charming and sincere word in my most precious recollection, from the man of sixty-three to the woman of fifty-three. June 27. Left Leeds at 7 A. M., rising at 4.30 .... To Miss [Frances Power] Cobbe's, where met Lady Lyall, Miss Clough, Mrs. Gorton, Jacob Bright, et al. Then to dinner with the dear Seeleys. An unceremonious and delightful meal. Heart of calf. Then to John Ridley's. ... Home late, almost dead — to bed, having been on foot twenty hours. July 4.... Saw a sight of misery, a little crumb of a boy, barefoot, tugging after a hand-organ man, also very shabby. Gave the little one a ha'penny, all t
ith you. Let me enshrine this charming and sincere word in my most precious recollection, from the man of sixty-three to the woman of fifty-three. June 27. Left Leeds at 7 A. M., rising at 4.30 .... To Miss [Frances Power] Cobbe's, where met Lady Lyall, Miss Clough, Mrs. Gorton, Jacob Bright, et al. Then to dinner with the dear Seeleys. An unceremonious and delightful meal. Heart of calf. Then to John Ridley's. ... Home late, almost dead — to bed, having been on foot twenty hours. July 4.... Saw a sight of misery, a little crumb of a boy, barefoot, tugging after a hand-organ man, also very shabby. Gave the little one a ha'penny, all the copper I had. But in the heartache he gave me, I resolved, God helping me, that my luxury shall henceforth be to minister to human misery, and to redeem much time and money spent on my own fancies, as I may.. .. She had been asked to attend two important meetings as American delegate: a peace congress in Paris, and a great prison reform m
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