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s face of the President with sympathy; then a voice was heard, Call for Mrs. Howe. Those present will never forget how her presence changed the meeting from a threatened failure to a noble success. The German, Frenchman, and Italian stood in turn by her side. At the proper moment she lifted a finger, and then gave in her perfect English each speech in full to the delight of the delegates and the admiration of all. The last celebration of her Mothers' Day was held in Riverton, New Jersey, on June 1, 1912, by the Pennsylvania Peace Society, in conjunction with the Universal Peace Union. On the printed invitation to this festival we read Aid it, paper, aid it, pen, Aid it, hearts of earnest men. Julia Ward Howe, 1874. And further on, Thirty-nine years ago Julia Ward Howe instituted this festival for peace,--a time for the women and children to come together; to meet in the country, invite the public, and recite, speak, sing and pray for those things that make for peace.
Such was the beginning of her work for peace, which was to end only with her life. Disappointed in her hope of a world congress, she turned the current of her effort in a new direction. She would have a festival, a day which should be called Mothers' Day, and be devoted to the advocacy of peace doctrines. She chose the second day of June; for many years she and her friends and followers kept this day religiously, with sweet and tender observances which were unspeakably dear to her. In 1876 there was a great peace meeting in Philadelphia. The occasion is thus described by the Reverend Ada C. Bowles: There were delegates from France, Italy, and Germany, each with a burning desire to be heard, and all worth hearing, but none able to speak English. The audience looked to the anxious face of the President with sympathy; then a voice was heard, Call for Mrs. Howe. Those present will never forget how her presence changed the meeting from a threatened failure to a noble success. Th
June 1st, 1912 AD (search for this): chapter 14
s face of the President with sympathy; then a voice was heard, Call for Mrs. Howe. Those present will never forget how her presence changed the meeting from a threatened failure to a noble success. The German, Frenchman, and Italian stood in turn by her side. At the proper moment she lifted a finger, and then gave in her perfect English each speech in full to the delight of the delegates and the admiration of all. The last celebration of her Mothers' Day was held in Riverton, New Jersey, on June 1, 1912, by the Pennsylvania Peace Society, in conjunction with the Universal Peace Union. On the printed invitation to this festival we read Aid it, paper, aid it, pen, Aid it, hearts of earnest men. Julia Ward Howe, 1874. And further on, Thirty-nine years ago Julia Ward Howe instituted this festival for peace,--a time for the women and children to come together; to meet in the country, invite the public, and recite, speak, sing and pray for those things that make for peace.
Ada C. Bowles (search for this): chapter 14
n her hope of a world congress, she turned the current of her effort in a new direction. She would have a festival, a day which should be called Mothers' Day, and be devoted to the advocacy of peace doctrines. She chose the second day of June; for many years she and her friends and followers kept this day religiously, with sweet and tender observances which were unspeakably dear to her. In 1876 there was a great peace meeting in Philadelphia. The occasion is thus described by the Reverend Ada C. Bowles: There were delegates from France, Italy, and Germany, each with a burning desire to be heard, and all worth hearing, but none able to speak English. The audience looked to the anxious face of the President with sympathy; then a voice was heard, Call for Mrs. Howe. Those present will never forget how her presence changed the meeting from a threatened failure to a noble success. The German, Frenchman, and Italian stood in turn by her side. At the proper moment she lifted a finge
G. B. Brummel (search for this): chapter 14
n Quixote. Now, she stood in the place that failing health forbade him to fill, with a depth of interest, an earnestness of purpose, equal to his own. She, too, now heard the sorrowful sighing of the prisoners. At one of the meetings of this congress, a jailer of the old school spoke in defence of the system of flogging refractory prisoners, and described in brutal fashion a brutal incident. Her blood was on fire: she asked leave to speak. It is related, she said, of the famous Beau Brummel that a gentleman who called upon him one morning met a valet carrying away a tray of neckcloths, more or less disordered. What are these? asked the visitor; and the servant replied, These are our failures! When I see the dark coach which in our country carries the criminal to his place of detention, I say, Society, here are your failures. Her words were loudly applauded, and the punishment was voted down. The Journal gives her further speech on this occasion: Spoke of justice to wo
William Cullen Bryant (search for this): chapter 14
together those persons supposedly interested in such a movement. In December, 1870, it was announced that a meeting for the purpose of considering and arranging the steps necessary to be taken for calling a World's Congress of Women in behalf of International Peace would be held in Union League Hall, Madison Avenue and Twentysixth Street, New York, on Friday, December 23. The announcement, which sets forth the need for and objects of such a congress, is signed by Julia Ward Howe, William Cullen Bryant, and Mary F. Davis. The meeting was an important one: there were addresses by Lucretia Mott, Octavius Frothingham, and Alfred Love, the Peace prophet of Philadelphia; letters from John Stuart Mill, Harriet Beecher Stowe, and William Howard Furness, who adjures peacelovers to labor for the establishment of a Supreme Court to which all differences between nations shall be referred for settlement. Mrs. Howe made the opening address, from which we quote these words:-- So I rep
Julius Caesar (search for this): chapter 14
ot wipe out dishonor, nor violence indicate possession. As men have often forsaken the plough and the anvil at the summons of war, let women now leave all that may be left of home for a great and earnest day of counsel. Let them meet first, as women, to bewail and commemorate the dead. Let them then solemnly take counsel with each other as to the means whereby the great human family can live in peace, man as the brother of man, each bearing after his own kind the sacred impress, not of Caesar, but of God. In the name of womanhood and of humanity, I earnestly ask that a general congress of women, without limit of nationality, may be appointed and held at some place deemed most convenient, and at the earliest period consistent with its objects, to promote the alliance of the different nationalities, the amicable settlement of international questions, the great and general interests of peace. The appeal was translated into French, Spanish, Italian, German, and Swedish, and se
Association. The occasion was to me a memorable one. She hired the Freemasons' Tavern and preached there on five or six successive Sundays. My procedure was very simple,--a prayer, the reading of a hymn, and a discourse from a Scripture text.... The attendance was very good throughout, and I cherished the hope that I had sown some seed which would bear fruit hereafter. She was asked to address meetings in various parts of England, speaking in Birmingham, Manchester, Leeds, Bristol, Carlisle, with good acceptance. In Cambridge she talked with Professor J. R. Seeley, whom she found most sympathetic. She was everywhere welcomed by thoughtful people, old friends and new, whether or no they sympathized with her quest. June 9. My first preaching in London. Worked pretty much all day at sermon, intending, not to read, but to talk it — for me, a difficult procedure. At 4.30 P. M. left off, but brain so tired that nothing in it. Subject, the kingdom of heaven.... Got a bad cup o
Jesus Christ (search for this): chapter 14
ntire delight and forgetfulness of everything else, and the restraining hand of Christ holding me back in the outer darkness — the want and woe of the world, and sayi Western mind with the Eastern subtleties of Jew and Greek seems to have struck Christ. He supposed Christ's power over unseen things to be like his own control overChrist's power over unseen things to be like his own control over things committed to his authority. Then Christ began, perhaps, to see that the other nations of the world would profit by his work and doctrine before his Jewish bChrist began, perhaps, to see that the other nations of the world would profit by his work and doctrine before his Jewish brethren. My first presidency at the New England Woman's Club.... I do not shine in presiding over a business meeting and some others can do much better than I. Sti talents ten in use to others and in enjoyment and profit to ourselves.... Christ's teaching about marriage. Its tender and sacred reciprocity. Adultery among r man's wife, but any woman's husband might have intercourse with other women. Christ showed how men did offend against this same law which worked so absolutely and
set by God to restrain the violence of the other. The New York meeting was followed by one in Boston. In the spring of 1871 the friends of peace met in the rooms of the New England Woman's Club, and formed an American Branch of the Women's International Peace Association: Julia Ward Howe, president. It took five meetings to accomplish this; the minutes of these meetings are curious and interesting. Mr. Moncure D. Conway wrote objecting strongly to the movement being announced as Christian: his objections were courteously considered. Mrs. Howe gave her reasons for making her Appeal in the name of Christianity. She found the doctrine of peace and forgiveness of injuries the most fundamental of the Christian doctrines. She thought it proper to say so, but did not by this prevent the believers in other religions from asserting the same doctrine, if considered as existing in those religions. Mr. Conway's objection was overruled. The object of the association was to pr
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