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he last of my dear friend E. Twisleton, who took me to the National Gallery, where we saw many precious gems of art.... At parting, he said: The good Father above does not often give so great a pleasure as I have had in these meetings with you. Let me enshrine this charming and sincere word in my most precious recollection, from the man of sixty-three to the woman of fifty-three. June 27. Left Leeds at 7 A. M., rising at 4.30 .... To Miss [Frances Power] Cobbe's, where met Lady Lyall, Miss Clough, Mrs. Gorton, Jacob Bright, et al. Then to dinner with the dear Seeleys. An unceremonious and delightful meal. Heart of calf. Then to John Ridley's. ... Home late, almost dead — to bed, having been on foot twenty hours. July 4.... Saw a sight of misery, a little crumb of a boy, barefoot, tugging after a hand-organ man, also very shabby. Gave the little one a ha'penny, all the copper I had. But in the heartache he gave me, I resolved, God helping me, that my luxury shall henceforth
Frances P. Cobbe (search for this): chapter 14
he discourse. June 18.... Saw the last of my dear friend E. Twisleton, who took me to the National Gallery, where we saw many precious gems of art.... At parting, he said: The good Father above does not often give so great a pleasure as I have had in these meetings with you. Let me enshrine this charming and sincere word in my most precious recollection, from the man of sixty-three to the woman of fifty-three. June 27. Left Leeds at 7 A. M., rising at 4.30 .... To Miss [Frances Power] Cobbe's, where met Lady Lyall, Miss Clough, Mrs. Gorton, Jacob Bright, et al. Then to dinner with the dear Seeleys. An unceremonious and delightful meal. Heart of calf. Then to John Ridley's. ... Home late, almost dead — to bed, having been on foot twenty hours. July 4.... Saw a sight of misery, a little crumb of a boy, barefoot, tugging after a hand-organ man, also very shabby. Gave the little one a ha'penny, all the copper I had. But in the heartache he gave me, I resolved, God helping m
Moncure D. Conway (search for this): chapter 14
e New England Woman's Club, and formed an American Branch of the Women's International Peace Association: Julia Ward Howe, president. It took five meetings to accomplish this; the minutes of these meetings are curious and interesting. Mr. Moncure D. Conway wrote objecting strongly to the movement being announced as Christian: his objections were courteously considered. Mrs. Howe gave her reasons for making her Appeal in the name of Christianity. She found the doctrine of peace and forgieness of injuries the most fundamental of the Christian doctrines. She thought it proper to say so, but did not by this prevent the believers in other religions from asserting the same doctrine, if considered as existing in those religions. Mr. Conway's objection was overruled. The object of the association was to promote peace, by the study and culture of its conditions. A notice appended to the constitution announced, This Association proposes to hold a World's Congress of Women, in Lo
Mary F. Davis (search for this): chapter 14
supposedly interested in such a movement. In December, 1870, it was announced that a meeting for the purpose of considering and arranging the steps necessary to be taken for calling a World's Congress of Women in behalf of International Peace would be held in Union League Hall, Madison Avenue and Twentysixth Street, New York, on Friday, December 23. The announcement, which sets forth the need for and objects of such a congress, is signed by Julia Ward Howe, William Cullen Bryant, and Mary F. Davis. The meeting was an important one: there were addresses by Lucretia Mott, Octavius Frothingham, and Alfred Love, the Peace prophet of Philadelphia; letters from John Stuart Mill, Harriet Beecher Stowe, and William Howard Furness, who adjures peacelovers to labor for the establishment of a Supreme Court to which all differences between nations shall be referred for settlement. Mrs. Howe made the opening address, from which we quote these words:-- So I repeat my call and cry to
and be devoted to the advocacy of peace doctrines. She chose the second day of June; for many years she and her friends and followers kept this day religiously, with sweet and tender observances which were unspeakably dear to her. In 1876 there was a great peace meeting in Philadelphia. The occasion is thus described by the Reverend Ada C. Bowles: There were delegates from France, Italy, and Germany, each with a burning desire to be heard, and all worth hearing, but none able to speak English. The audience looked to the anxious face of the President with sympathy; then a voice was heard, Call for Mrs. Howe. Those present will never forget how her presence changed the meeting from a threatened failure to a noble success. The German, Frenchman, and Italian stood in turn by her side. At the proper moment she lifted a finger, and then gave in her perfect English each speech in full to the delight of the delegates and the admiration of all. The last celebration of her Mothers
John Fiske (search for this): chapter 14
teaching of the tender mutual obligations of married life was probably new to many of his hearers. The present style of woman has really been fashioned by man, and is only quasi feminine. Peace meeting at Mystic, Connecticut. Spoke morning and afternoon, best in the morning. The natural unfolding of reform. His purposes will ripen fast --Watts's verse. Providence does not plant so as to gather all its crops in one day. First the flowers, then the fruits, then the golden grain. John Fiske's lecture, first in the course on the theory of Evolution. ... Did not think the lecture a very profitable one, yet we must be willing that our opposites should think and speak out their belief. In the spring of 1872 she went to England, hoping to hold a Woman's Peace Congress in London. She also hoped to found and foster a Woman's Apostolate of Peace. These hopes were not then to be fulfilled: yet she always felt that this visit, with all its labors and its disappointments, was well
after his own kind the sacred impress, not of Caesar, but of God. In the name of womanhood and of humanity, I earnestly ask that a general congress of women, without limit of nationality, may be appointed and held at some place deemed most convenient, and at the earliest period consistent with its objects, to promote the alliance of the different nationalities, the amicable settlement of international questions, the great and general interests of peace. The appeal was translated into French, Spanish, Italian, German, and Swedish, and sent broadcast far and wide. In October our mother wrote to Aaron Powell, president of the American Peace Society: The issue is one which will unite virtually the whole sex. God gave us, I think, the word to say, but it ought to be followed by immediate and organizing action.... Now, you, my dear sir, are bound, as a Friend and as an Advocate of Peace, to take especial interest in this matter, so I call upon you a little confidently, hoping that
Octavius Frothingham (search for this): chapter 14
g for the purpose of considering and arranging the steps necessary to be taken for calling a World's Congress of Women in behalf of International Peace would be held in Union League Hall, Madison Avenue and Twentysixth Street, New York, on Friday, December 23. The announcement, which sets forth the need for and objects of such a congress, is signed by Julia Ward Howe, William Cullen Bryant, and Mary F. Davis. The meeting was an important one: there were addresses by Lucretia Mott, Octavius Frothingham, and Alfred Love, the Peace prophet of Philadelphia; letters from John Stuart Mill, Harriet Beecher Stowe, and William Howard Furness, who adjures peacelovers to labor for the establishment of a Supreme Court to which all differences between nations shall be referred for settlement. Mrs. Howe made the opening address, from which we quote these words:-- So I repeat my call and cry to women. Let it pierce through dirt and rags — let it pierce through velvet and cashmere. It is
William Howard Furness (search for this): chapter 14
nternational Peace would be held in Union League Hall, Madison Avenue and Twentysixth Street, New York, on Friday, December 23. The announcement, which sets forth the need for and objects of such a congress, is signed by Julia Ward Howe, William Cullen Bryant, and Mary F. Davis. The meeting was an important one: there were addresses by Lucretia Mott, Octavius Frothingham, and Alfred Love, the Peace prophet of Philadelphia; letters from John Stuart Mill, Harriet Beecher Stowe, and William Howard Furness, who adjures peacelovers to labor for the establishment of a Supreme Court to which all differences between nations shall be referred for settlement. Mrs. Howe made the opening address, from which we quote these words:-- So I repeat my call and cry to women. Let it pierce through dirt and rags — let it pierce through velvet and cashmere. It is the call of humanity. It says: Help others, and you help yourselves. Let the woman seize and bear about the prophetic word of t
period consistent with its objects, to promote the alliance of the different nationalities, the amicable settlement of international questions, the great and general interests of peace. The appeal was translated into French, Spanish, Italian, German, and Swedish, and sent broadcast far and wide. In October our mother wrote to Aaron Powell, president of the American Peace Society: The issue is one which will unite virtually the whole sex. God gave us, I think, the word to say, but it oughtappointing, may heal her deadly wounds and uplift her prostrate heart. She must learn that the doctrine of self is irreligious. The Commune surely knew this just as little as did Louis Napoleon. I want to keep eyesight enough to read Greek and German, and my teeth for clear speaking and good digestion. Paul says: Ye that are strong ought to bear the infirmities of the weak, but now we that are weak bear the infirmities of the strong. Peace meeting at the Club. Read in Greek first part
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