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Mary F. Davis (search for this): chapter 14
supposedly interested in such a movement. In December, 1870, it was announced that a meeting for the purpose of considering and arranging the steps necessary to be taken for calling a World's Congress of Women in behalf of International Peace would be held in Union League Hall, Madison Avenue and Twentysixth Street, New York, on Friday, December 23. The announcement, which sets forth the need for and objects of such a congress, is signed by Julia Ward Howe, William Cullen Bryant, and Mary F. Davis. The meeting was an important one: there were addresses by Lucretia Mott, Octavius Frothingham, and Alfred Love, the Peace prophet of Philadelphia; letters from John Stuart Mill, Harriet Beecher Stowe, and William Howard Furness, who adjures peacelovers to labor for the establishment of a Supreme Court to which all differences between nations shall be referred for settlement. Mrs. Howe made the opening address, from which we quote these words:-- So I repeat my call and cry to
Villa Julia (search for this): chapter 14
d with some embarrassment that she might speak to the officers of the society, when the public meeting should be adjourned! She makes no comment on this proceeding, but says, I accordingly met a dozen or more of these gentlemen in a side room, where I simply spoke of my endeavors to enlist the sympathies and efforts of women in behalf of the world's peace. Returning to London, she had the privilege of attending as a delegate one of the great Prison Reform meetings of our day. In 1843, Julia the bride would not have considered it a privilege to attend a meeting for prison reform. She would have shrugged her shoulders, would perhaps have pouted because the Chevalier cared more for these things than for the opera, with Grisi, Mario, and Lablache: she might even have written some funny verses about the windmill-tilting of her Don Quixote. Now, she stood in the place that failing health forbade him to fill, with a depth of interest, an earnestness of purpose, equal to his own. Sh
Frances P. Cobbe (search for this): chapter 14
he discourse. June 18.... Saw the last of my dear friend E. Twisleton, who took me to the National Gallery, where we saw many precious gems of art.... At parting, he said: The good Father above does not often give so great a pleasure as I have had in these meetings with you. Let me enshrine this charming and sincere word in my most precious recollection, from the man of sixty-three to the woman of fifty-three. June 27. Left Leeds at 7 A. M., rising at 4.30 .... To Miss [Frances Power] Cobbe's, where met Lady Lyall, Miss Clough, Mrs. Gorton, Jacob Bright, et al. Then to dinner with the dear Seeleys. An unceremonious and delightful meal. Heart of calf. Then to John Ridley's. ... Home late, almost dead — to bed, having been on foot twenty hours. July 4.... Saw a sight of misery, a little crumb of a boy, barefoot, tugging after a hand-organ man, also very shabby. Gave the little one a ha'penny, all the copper I had. But in the heartache he gave me, I resolved, God helping m
Theodore Watts (search for this): chapter 14
e law which worked so absolutely and partially against women. An unchaste thought in the breast of the man infringed the high law of purity. This teaching of the tender mutual obligations of married life was probably new to many of his hearers. The present style of woman has really been fashioned by man, and is only quasi feminine. Peace meeting at Mystic, Connecticut. Spoke morning and afternoon, best in the morning. The natural unfolding of reform. His purposes will ripen fast --Watts's verse. Providence does not plant so as to gather all its crops in one day. First the flowers, then the fruits, then the golden grain. John Fiske's lecture, first in the course on the theory of Evolution. ... Did not think the lecture a very profitable one, yet we must be willing that our opposites should think and speak out their belief. In the spring of 1872 she went to England, hoping to hold a Woman's Peace Congress in London. She also hoped to found and foster a Woman's Aposto
he last of my dear friend E. Twisleton, who took me to the National Gallery, where we saw many precious gems of art.... At parting, he said: The good Father above does not often give so great a pleasure as I have had in these meetings with you. Let me enshrine this charming and sincere word in my most precious recollection, from the man of sixty-three to the woman of fifty-three. June 27. Left Leeds at 7 A. M., rising at 4.30 .... To Miss [Frances Power] Cobbe's, where met Lady Lyall, Miss Clough, Mrs. Gorton, Jacob Bright, et al. Then to dinner with the dear Seeleys. An unceremonious and delightful meal. Heart of calf. Then to John Ridley's. ... Home late, almost dead — to bed, having been on foot twenty hours. July 4.... Saw a sight of misery, a little crumb of a boy, barefoot, tugging after a hand-organ man, also very shabby. Gave the little one a ha'penny, all the copper I had. But in the heartache he gave me, I resolved, God helping me, that my luxury shall henceforth
Louis Napoleon (search for this): chapter 14
rst work under this new impulse was for peace. The Franco-Prussian War of 1870 made a deep and painful impression upon her. She had felt a bitter dislike for Louis Napoleon ever since the day when he stabbed France in her sleep by the Coup d'ttat of December, 1851; but she loved France and the French people; the overwhelming defyear, I hope that my peace matter will have assumed a practical and useful form, and that I may have worked out my conception worthily.... I pray that neither Louis Napoleon nor the Bourbons may return to feed upon France, but that merciful measures, surely of God's appointing, may heal her deadly wounds and uplift her prostrate heart. She must learn that the doctrine of self is irreligious. The Commune surely knew this just as little as did Louis Napoleon. I want to keep eyesight enough to read Greek and German, and my teeth for clear speaking and good digestion. Paul says: Ye that are strong ought to bear the infirmities of the weak, but now we tha
Giulia Grisi (search for this): chapter 14
room, where I simply spoke of my endeavors to enlist the sympathies and efforts of women in behalf of the world's peace. Returning to London, she had the privilege of attending as a delegate one of the great Prison Reform meetings of our day. In 1843, Julia the bride would not have considered it a privilege to attend a meeting for prison reform. She would have shrugged her shoulders, would perhaps have pouted because the Chevalier cared more for these things than for the opera, with Grisi, Mario, and Lablache: she might even have written some funny verses about the windmill-tilting of her Don Quixote. Now, she stood in the place that failing health forbade him to fill, with a depth of interest, an earnestness of purpose, equal to his own. She, too, now heard the sorrowful sighing of the prisoners. At one of the meetings of this congress, a jailer of the old school spoke in defence of the system of flogging refractory prisoners, and described in brutal fashion a brutal inc
Childe Roland (search for this): chapter 14
nt, indeed. A woman of middle age, quiet in dress and manner, with a serene and constant dignity; a face in which the lines of thought and study were deepening year by year; eyes now flashing with mirth, now tender with sympathy, always bright with the high resolve and hardihood for which, but a few years before, she had been sighing: this was the woman who came to London in 1872, alone and unaided; who, standing before the Dark Tower of established Order and Precedent, might say with Childe Roland,-- Dauntless the slug horn to my lips I set, And blew. She spoke at the banquet of the Unitarian Association. The occasion was to me a memorable one. She hired the Freemasons' Tavern and preached there on five or six successive Sundays. My procedure was very simple,--a prayer, the reading of a hymn, and a discourse from a Scripture text.... The attendance was very good throughout, and I cherished the hope that I had sown some seed which would bear fruit hereafter. She was
J. R. Seeley (search for this): chapter 14
Freemasons' Tavern and preached there on five or six successive Sundays. My procedure was very simple,--a prayer, the reading of a hymn, and a discourse from a Scripture text.... The attendance was very good throughout, and I cherished the hope that I had sown some seed which would bear fruit hereafter. She was asked to address meetings in various parts of England, speaking in Birmingham, Manchester, Leeds, Bristol, Carlisle, with good acceptance. In Cambridge she talked with Professor J. R. Seeley, whom she found most sympathetic. She was everywhere welcomed by thoughtful people, old friends and new, whether or no they sympathized with her quest. June 9. My first preaching in London. Worked pretty much all day at sermon, intending, not to read, but to talk it — for me, a difficult procedure. At 4.30 P. M. left off, but brain so tired that nothing in it. Subject, the kingdom of heaven.... Got a bad cup of tea -dressed (in my well-worn black silk) and went to the Drawing-R
where I simply spoke of my endeavors to enlist the sympathies and efforts of women in behalf of the world's peace. Returning to London, she had the privilege of attending as a delegate one of the great Prison Reform meetings of our day. In 1843, Julia the bride would not have considered it a privilege to attend a meeting for prison reform. She would have shrugged her shoulders, would perhaps have pouted because the Chevalier cared more for these things than for the opera, with Grisi, Mario, and Lablache: she might even have written some funny verses about the windmill-tilting of her Don Quixote. Now, she stood in the place that failing health forbade him to fill, with a depth of interest, an earnestness of purpose, equal to his own. She, too, now heard the sorrowful sighing of the prisoners. At one of the meetings of this congress, a jailer of the old school spoke in defence of the system of flogging refractory prisoners, and described in brutal fashion a brutal incident.
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