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San Geronimo (New Mexico, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
Portland she spent several days, lectured three times, and was most hospitably entertained. On her one disengaged evening she went down into the hotel parlor, played for the guests to dance, played accompaniments for them to sing. She spoke to the school children; she made slight acquaintance with various people, most of whom told her the story of their lives. Briefly, she touched life at every point. Finally, on May 5, she reached San Francisco, and a few hours later the ranch of San Geronimo, where the Mailliards had been living for some years. Situation very beautiful, she says; a cup in the mountains. Here she found her beloved sister Annie, the little Hitter of her early letters; here she spent happy days, warm with outer and inner sunshine. California was a-tiptoe with eagerness to see and hear the author of the Battle Hymn ; many lectures were planned, in San Francisco and elsewhere. The Journal gives but brief glimpses of this California visit, which she always
Melrose (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
ton; of the martyrdom of feeling endured by friends of the slave — of Parker's heroic house and pulpit. It seemed, as it often does, great to have known these things, little to have done so little in consequence. November 27. Finished my lecture on Woman in the Greek Drama. It was high time, as my head and eyes are tired with the persistent strain.... All the past week has been hard work. No pleasure reading except a very little in the evening. December 1. . . . Took 2.30 train for Melrose .... I read my new lecture--Woman as shown by the Greek Dramatists: of whom I quoted from Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Aristophanes. A Club Tea followed: a pleasant one. I asked the mothers present whether they educated their daughters in hygiene and housekeeping. The response was not enthusiastic, and people were more disposed to talk of the outer world, careers of women, business or profession, than to speak of the home business. One young girl, however, told us that she was a housekeepi
Drewry's Bluff (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
ords with anxious care each visionary word and gesture. Dreamed this morning of Charles Sumner and dearest Julia. She was talking to me; part of the time reclining on a sort of lounge. I said to some one, This is our own dear Julia, feel how warm she is. .. .I think I said something about our wanting to see her oftener. She said pathetically, Can't you talk of me? I said, We do, darling. Not very often, I think was her reply. Then she seemed to come very near me, and I said to her, Darling, do they let you come here as often as you want to? She said, Not quite. I asked why, and she answered almost inaudibly, They are afraid of my troubling people. I stirred and woke; but the dear vision remains with me, almost calling me across the silent sea. She writes innumerable letters; date and address of each is carefully noted, and now and then an abstract of her words. The bane of all representative action is that the spur of personal ambition will carry people further than
Tonawanda (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
P. M. When the buggy was brought to the door of the hotel, I said: How am I to get in? Take it slow and learn to pedal, said my old driver. Presently he said, I guess you ain't so old as I be. I replied, I am pretty well on toward seventy. Well, I am five years beyond, said he. He drives an accommodation wagon between Perrysburg and Versailles, a small town where a man once wanted to set up a mill, and to buy land and water power, and they would n't sell either. Whereupon he went to Tonawanda and made the place. Guess they'd have done better to gin him the land and water, and to set up his mill for him, said my man, Hinds. On this trip she saw the Mammoth Cave of Kentucky, taking the seven-mile walk; went as far as Kansas City; was received everywhere with delightful warmth. To Laura December 1, 1886. You see, I was waiting for the winter to begin, in order to write you, and that you ought to have known. But bless you, in Gardiner, Maine, you don't know when real Win
Versailles (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
andlord to lend his buggy and a kindly old fellow to harness his horses to it, and drove twenty miles or more over the mountains, reaching Dunkirk by 5.10 P. M. When the buggy was brought to the door of the hotel, I said: How am I to get in? Take it slow and learn to pedal, said my old driver. Presently he said, I guess you ain't so old as I be. I replied, I am pretty well on toward seventy. Well, I am five years beyond, said he. He drives an accommodation wagon between Perrysburg and Versailles, a small town where a man once wanted to set up a mill, and to buy land and water power, and they would n't sell either. Whereupon he went to Tonawanda and made the place. Guess they'd have done better to gin him the land and water, and to set up his mill for him, said my man, Hinds. On this trip she saw the Mammoth Cave of Kentucky, taking the seven-mile walk; went as far as Kansas City; was received everywhere with delightful warmth. To Laura December 1, 1886. You see, I was w
Newport (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
is wit to the service of the old aristocratic party. Returned to Boston and took train for Weirs, New Hampshire, where arrived more dead than alive. She is at Newport now, and there are tender notes of pleasure with the Hall grandchildren, of reading and prayers with them on Sunday, of picnics and sailing parties. Still, in to Chicago, where Maud kept and comforted her as long as might be, and sent her refreshed on her way; finally to Boston, where she arrived half-starved, and so to Newport. To Maud July 8, 1888. Grumble, grumble — tumble, tumble, For something to eat, Fast-y fast-y nasty, nasty, At last, at last-y, Ma's dead beat! Oh! the is the coating of worldliness which seems to varnish the life out of a man; dead eyes, dead smile, and (worst of all) dead breath. September 23. To church in Newport. A suggestive sermon from Mr. Alger on Watching, i.e., upon all the agencies that watch us, children, foes, friends, critics, authorities, spirits, God himself.
San Francisco (California, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
acquaintance with various people, most of whom told her the story of their lives. Briefly, she touched life at every point. Finally, on May 5, she reached San Francisco, and a few hours later the ranch of San Geronimo, where the Mailliards had been living for some years. Situation very beautiful, she says; a cup in the mouns, warm with outer and inner sunshine. California was a-tiptoe with eagerness to see and hear the author of the Battle Hymn ; many lectures were planned, in San Francisco and elsewhere. The Journal gives but brief glimpses of this California visit, which she always recalled with delight as one of the best of all her great good et converse, of following and dependence, end with this event. So we come to the last day at the ranch, the parting with the dear sister; the departure for San Francisco, laden with roses and good wishes. On the way eastward she stopped at Salt Lake City, and went to the Mormon Tabernacle; an enormous building with a roof li
Provo (Utah, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
uoting Milton and Emerson. He spoke of the Christian Church with patronizing indulgence; insisted upon the doctrine of immediate and personal revelation, and censured the Mormons for sometimes considering their families before their church. Communion, bread in silver baskets and water in silver cups, handed to every one, children partaking with the rest; no solemnity. June 26. To visit the penitentiary, where thirty Mormon bishops are imprisoned for polygamy. Spoke with one, Bishop of Provo, a rather canny-looking man, whom we found in the prison library, reading. The librarian (four years term for forgery) told me it was the result of liquor and bad company. I said a few motherly words to him and presently proposed to speak to the prisoners, to which the jailer gladly assented. I began by saying, I feel to speak to you, my brothers. Said that all of us make mistakes and many of us do wrong at times. Exhorted them to give, in future, obedience to the laws upon which the ex
Milton (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
y. Well, I am five years beyond, said he. He drives an accommodation wagon between Perrysburg and Versailles, a small town where a man once wanted to set up a mill, and to buy land and water power, and they would n't sell either. Whereupon he went to Tonawanda and made the place. Guess they'd have done better to gin him the land and water, and to set up his mill for him, said my man, Hinds. On this trip she saw the Mammoth Cave of Kentucky, taking the seven-mile walk; went as far as Kansas City; was received everywhere with delightful warmth. To Laura December 1, 1886. You see, I was waiting for the winter to begin, in order to write you, and that you ought to have known. But bless you, in Gardiner, Maine, you don't know when real Winter begins, 'cause you have so much sham winter. Well, better late than never. Here's thanking you very much for the delightful [tea] cozy. Maud said, What are you going to do with it? sarcasticlike. I replied, Put it on my head ; to whic
Dunkirk (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
s house. Had to work tight every minute. ... This Western lecture trip was like many others, yet it had its own peculiar pleasures and mishaps. October 12. Dunkirk, lecture.... No one must know that I got off at the wrong station — Perrysburg, a forlorn hamlet. No train that would bring me to Dunkirk before 6.30 P. M. OughtDunkirk before 6.30 P. M. Ought to have arrived at 1.30. Went to the hotel, persuaded the landlord to lend his buggy and a kindly old fellow to harness his horses to it, and drove twenty miles or more over the mountains, reaching Dunkirk by 5.10 P. M. When the buggy was brought to the door of the hotel, I said: How am I to get in? Take it slow and learn to peDunkirk by 5.10 P. M. When the buggy was brought to the door of the hotel, I said: How am I to get in? Take it slow and learn to pedal, said my old driver. Presently he said, I guess you ain't so old as I be. I replied, I am pretty well on toward seventy. Well, I am five years beyond, said he. He drives an accommodation wagon between Perrysburg and Versailles, a small town where a man once wanted to set up a mill, and to buy land and water power, and they w
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