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William Sturgis (search for this): chapter 22
p and instruction, and other dear and valued friends, notably Sarah Shaw Russell, Mrs. George Russell, widow of the Doctor's friend and college chum. Abby W. May and Carrie Tappan. Caroline Tappan was Caroline Sturgis, daughter of Captain William Sturgis, and sister of Ellen (Sturgis) Hooper,--member of the inmost Transcendentalist circle, and friend of Emerson, Ellery Channing, and Margaret Fuller. I desire to set my house in order, and be ready for my departure; thankful to live, or wily Sarah Shaw Russell, Mrs. George Russell, widow of the Doctor's friend and college chum. Abby W. May and Carrie Tappan. Caroline Tappan was Caroline Sturgis, daughter of Captain William Sturgis, and sister of Ellen (Sturgis) Hooper,--member of the inmost Transcendentalist circle, and friend of Emerson, Ellery Channing, and Margaret Fuller. I desire to set my house in order, and be ready for my departure; thankful to live, or willing to cease from my mortal life when God so wills. . .
Villa Julia (search for this): chapter 22
y the course of her private life: the death of Julia, the beloved eldest daughter, and the marriagens and boats. In the last days of February, Julia was stricken with rheumatic fever, which soon imperative; but a telegram summoned her back: Julia was not so well, and a pain as of death fell obelieve, that it was the beginning of the end. Julia was presently very happy, with Michael on one beyond that of worldly fame. She considered Julia the most gifted of her children. The Reminisco any. In all things pertaining to philosophy, Julia was her special intimate. For help and sympatt. July 20 found her at Concord, where she and Julia had been wont to go together. She says, I canaddress, in which he spoke beautifully of dear Julia and her service to the blind; also of her fathmed this morning of Charles Sumner and dearest Julia. She was talking to me; part of the time reclnge. I said to some one, This is our own dear Julia, feel how warm she is. .. .I think I said some[1 more...]
Francis Jackson (search for this): chapter 22
, integral humanity, ideal justice. I spoke of the attitude and action of Minerva in the Eumenides; Cf. Aeschylus. her resistance to the Furies, who I said personified popular passion fortified by ancient tradition; her firm stand for a just trial, and her casting the decisive ballot. I hoped that this would prefigure a great life-drama in which this gracious prophecy would be realized. In a good talk with Miss Eddy, Miss Sarah J. Eddy, then of Providence, a granddaughter of Francis Jackson. she devises a correspondence and circular to obtain information concerning art clubs throughout the country. I am to draft the circular. She makes an address at the Unitarian Club in Providence. The keynote to this was given me yesterday, by the sight of the people who thronged the popular churches, attracted, in a great measure no doubt, by the Easter decoration and music. I thought: What a pity that everybody cannot hear Phillips Brooks. I also thought: They can all hear the
Frederick Hedge (search for this): chapter 22
able breakfast at Cleveland, and a bad dinner at Buffalo, but dry your eyes, the strawberry shortcake was uncommonly good. And think how good it is that I have got through with it all and can now rest good and handsome. The summer entries in the Journal are varied and picturesque. My cow, of which I was fond, was found dead this morning. ... My neighbor Almy was very kind. ... I feel this a good deal, but complaining will not help matters. Mr. Bancroft [George], historian, brought Dr. Hedge to call after dinner. Mr. B. kissed me on both cheeks for the first time in his life. We had a very pleasant and rather brilliant talk, as might have been expected where such men meet. She writes to Maud:-- Mr. Alger seized upon my left ear metaphorically and emptied into it all the five-syllable words that he knew, and the result was a mingling of active and passive lunacy, for I almost went mad and he had not far to go in that direction. And again; apropos of-- : How the great
Sarah Shaw Russell (search for this): chapter 22
nging solemn thoughts of the uncertainty of life, and sorrow for such misuse of its great gifts and opportunities as I am well conscious of. This has been a good year to me. It carried me to the Pacific slope, and showed me indeed a land of promise. It gave me an unexpected joy in the harmonious feelings toward me and the members of A. A.W. at the Detroit Congress. It has, alas! taken from me my dear pastor, most precious to me for help and instruction, and other dear and valued friends, notably Sarah Shaw Russell, Mrs. George Russell, widow of the Doctor's friend and college chum. Abby W. May and Carrie Tappan. Caroline Tappan was Caroline Sturgis, daughter of Captain William Sturgis, and sister of Ellen (Sturgis) Hooper,--member of the inmost Transcendentalist circle, and friend of Emerson, Ellery Channing, and Margaret Fuller. I desire to set my house in order, and be ready for my departure; thankful to live, or willing to cease from my mortal life when God so wills. . .
Anna Brown (search for this): chapter 22
p has blue eyes and a shaggy head of grizzled hair. After Tacoma came hospitable Seattle ; where she lectured and attended a meeting of the Seattle Emerson Club; then to Olympia, by a small Sound steamer. A queer old bachelor on board, hearing me say that I should like to live in Washington Territory, said he would give me a handsome house and lot if I would live in Olympia, at which several Olympians present laughed. She left Olympia by train, en route for Portland. The conductor, Brown by name, saw the name on her valise, and claimed acquaintance, remembering her when she lived in Boylston Place. Soon after, passing a lovely little mill-stream, with a few houses near it, by name Tumwater, she consulted him as to the value of land there, with the result that she bought several acres of good bottom land. This was one of several small purchases of land made during her various journeyings. She always hoped that they would bring about large results: the Tumwater property wa
rvant Dora made me a hot cup which refreshed me greatly. Very hoarse at my lecture. Opera House a good one enough; for a desk, a box mounted on a barrel, all covered with a colored paper; decent enough. Lecture: Polite Society ; well received. The Spokane of to-day may smile at the small things of yesterday; yet our mother always spoke with pleasure of her cordial reception there. Walla Walla, Walula, Paser. In the last-named place she found a tavern with many claimants for beds. Mrs. Isaacs, who came with me from Walla Walla for a little change of air, could not have a separate room, and we were glad to share not only a small room but also a three-quarters bed. I was cramped and slept miserably. She was very quiet and amiable. At Tacoma again (on the way whither she felt as if her life hung by a thread while crossing the Notch), there was but one room for the two ladies, but they occupied it very peacefully. After church at Tacoma we heard singing in one of the parlo
A. Bronson Alcott (search for this): chapter 22
od's sweet angels are with us when we contend against the extreme of calamity. Heavy as this affliction was, it brought none of the paralysis of grief caused by Sammy's death: rather, as after the passing of the Chevalier, she was urged by the thought of her dead child to more and higher efforts. In the quiet of Oak Glen she wrote this summer a careful study of Dante and Beatrice, for the Concord School of Philosophy. This was a summer school of ten years (1879-88) in which Emerson, Alcott, and W. T. Harris took part. July 20 found her at Concord, where she and Julia had been wont to go together. She says, I cannot think of the sittings of the School without a vision of the rapt expression of her face as she sat and listened to the various speakers. Reminiscences, p. 440. Spite of her grief in missing this sweet companionship she found the sessions of the School deeply interesting. She was much more nervous than usual about her lecture; which really sounded a good deal
Sarah J. Eddy (search for this): chapter 22
opular passion fortified by ancient tradition; her firm stand for a just trial, and her casting the decisive ballot. I hoped that this would prefigure a great life-drama in which this gracious prophecy would be realized. In a good talk with Miss Eddy, Miss Sarah J. Eddy, then of Providence, a granddaughter of Francis Jackson. she devises a correspondence and circular to obtain information concerning art clubs throughout the country. I am to draft the circular. She makes an address aMiss Sarah J. Eddy, then of Providence, a granddaughter of Francis Jackson. she devises a correspondence and circular to obtain information concerning art clubs throughout the country. I am to draft the circular. She makes an address at the Unitarian Club in Providence. The keynote to this was given me yesterday, by the sight of the people who thronged the popular churches, attracted, in a great measure no doubt, by the Easter decoration and music. I thought: What a pity that everybody cannot hear Phillips Brooks. I also thought: They can all hear the lesson of heavenly truth in the great Church of All Souls and of All Saints; there is room enough and to spare. She writes a poem for the Blind Kindergarten at Jamaica P
Mary Dwight (search for this): chapter 22
10.20 A. M. train, to attend the celebration of Michael's [Anagnos] fiftieth birthday at the Institution, and the opening meeting of the N. E.W. C.... Arriving in Boston, I ran about somewhat, fatiguing myself dreadfully. Reached the Institution by 4.30 P. M., when, throwing myself on the bed for necessary rest, the desired rhymes for Anagnos's birthday flashed upon me, all of a sudden, and instead of napping, I called for pen and ink and wrote them. The meeting was very good; I presided. Dwight and Rodocanachi made speeches, the latter presenting the beautiful chain given to Michael by the teachers of the Institution. Michael was much moved and could not but be much gratified. I proposed three cheers at the end. I stole half an hour to attend a meeting in memory of Hannah Stephenson [the friend and house-mate of Theodore Parker] of whom much good was said that I did not know of. I reproached myself for having always been repelled by her ugliness of countenance and tart manner
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