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John Milton (search for this): chapter 22
of following and dependence, end with this event. So we come to the last day at the ranch, the parting with the dear sister; the departure for San Francisco, laden with roses and good wishes. On the way eastward she stopped at Salt Lake City, and went to the Mormon Tabernacle; an enormous building with a roof like the back of a turtle; many tourists present. The Mormons mostly an ill-looking and ill-smelling crowd. Bishop Whitney, a young man, preached a cosmopolite sermon, quoting Milton and Emerson. He spoke of the Christian Church with patronizing indulgence; insisted upon the doctrine of immediate and personal revelation, and censured the Mormons for sometimes considering their families before their church. Communion, bread in silver baskets and water in silver cups, handed to every one, children partaking with the rest; no solemnity. June 26. To visit the penitentiary, where thirty Mormon bishops are imprisoned for polygamy. Spoke with one, Bishop of Provo, a rath
have come to grieve more over my moral disappointments than over my intellectual ones. With my natural talents I had nothing to do: with my use or abuse of them, everything. I have thought, too, lately, of a reason why we should not neglect our duty to others for our real or supposed duty to ourselves. It is this: ourselves we have always with us; our fellows flit from our company, or pass away and we must help them when and while we can. On December 5 she hears the bitter news of Abby May's death. Alas! and alas! for the community, for her many friends, and for the Club and the Congress in which she did such great silent service. God rest her in His sweet peace! On Christmas Day she went to Trinity Church, where I enjoyed Phillips Brooks's sermon. Felt much drawn to go to communion with the rest; but thought it might occasion surprise and annoyance. Going into a remote upper gallery I was present at the scene, and felt that I had my communion without partaking
Henry Ward Beecher (search for this): chapter 22
ls, of which one is a paper for the Woman Suffrage Bazaar, which paper I am doing my best to edit. I cannot in conscience ask you to send me anything for its columns, because, poor dear, you have to do so much work on your own account. At the same time, a trifling overflow into the hat would be very welcome.... Winter brought another grave anxiety. Florence in her turn developed rheumatic fever and became alarmingly ill. The mother-bird flew to her in terror. On the way she met Henry Ward Beecher and told him of her deep distress, made still more poignant by the thought of the little children who might be left motherless. She was scarcely comforted by his assurance that he had known stepmothers who were very good to their stepchildren ! It was Christmas time, and she divided her time between the beloved patient and the children who must not lack their holiday cheer. December 27. The day was a very distressing one to me. I sat much of the time beside Flossy with a strange
Julia Ward Howe (search for this): chapter 22
nd reading. She works hard to finish her paper on Women in the Three Professions, Law, Medicine, and Theology, for the Chautauquan. Very tired afterwards. She speaks at the Newport Opera House with Mrs. Livermore (who said she did not know Mrs. Howe could speak so well); she takes part in the Authors' Reading for the Longfellow Memorial in the Boston Museum, reciting Our orders and the Battle Hymn, with her lines to Longfellow recently composed. I wore my velvet gown, my mother's lace, of Perabo, who was really interesting and remarkable. At one of the hospitable cities, a gentleman asked her to drive with him, drove her about for a couple of hours, descanting upon the beauties of the place, and afterwards proclaimed that Mrs. Howe was the most agreeable woman he had ever met. And I never once opened my lips! she said. On June 10 she preached in Oakland: the one sermon which I have felt like preaching in these parts: Thou art Peter, and upon this rock. The hou
Ralph Waldo Emerson (search for this): chapter 22
len she wrote this summer a careful study of Dante and Beatrice, for the Concord School of Philosophy. This was a summer school of ten years (1879-88) in which Emerson, Alcott, and W. T. Harris took part. July 20 found her at Concord, where she and Julia had been wont to go together. She says, I cannot think of the sittings of many tourists present. The Mormons mostly an ill-looking and ill-smelling crowd. Bishop Whitney, a young man, preached a cosmopolite sermon, quoting Milton and Emerson. He spoke of the Christian Church with patronizing indulgence; insisted upon the doctrine of immediate and personal revelation, and censured the Mormons for somepan was Caroline Sturgis, daughter of Captain William Sturgis, and sister of Ellen (Sturgis) Hooper,--member of the inmost Transcendentalist circle, and friend of Emerson, Ellery Channing, and Margaret Fuller. I desire to set my house in order, and be ready for my departure; thankful to live, or willing to cease from my mortal life
emed, as it often does, great to have known these things, little to have done so little in consequence. November 27. Finished my lecture on Woman in the Greek Drama. It was high time, as my head and eyes are tired with the persistent strain.... All the past week has been hard work. No pleasure reading except a very little in the evening. December 1. . . . Took 2.30 train for Melrose .... I read my new lecture--Woman as shown by the Greek Dramatists: of whom I quoted from Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Aristophanes. A Club Tea followed: a pleasant one. I asked the mothers present whether they educated their daughters in hygiene and housekeeping. The response was not enthusiastic, and people were more disposed to talk of the outer world, careers of women, business or profession, than to speak of the home business. One young girl, however, told us that she was a housekeeping girl; a very pleasant lady, Mrs. Burr, had been trained by her mother, to her own great advantage. Decem
ooch which I saw; thought I had best conquer my desire, and did so. At Ventura: Got so tired that I could hardly dress for lecture. The next day she proposed to Mrs. S. at dinner (1 P. M.) to invite some young people for the evening, promising to play for them to dance. She [Mrs. S.] ordered a buggy and drove about the village. Her son stretched a burlap on the straw matting and waxed it. About thirty came. We had some sweet music, singers with good voices, and among others a pupil of Perabo, who was really interesting and remarkable. At one of the hospitable cities, a gentleman asked her to drive with him, drove her about for a couple of hours, descanting upon the beauties of the place, and afterwards proclaimed that Mrs. Howe was the most agreeable woman he had ever met. And I never once opened my lips! she said. On June 10 she preached in Oakland: the one sermon which I have felt like preaching in these parts: Thou art Peter, and upon this rock. The house was w
Charles Sumner (search for this): chapter 22
es of having always lent his wit to the service of the old aristocratic party. Returned to Boston and took train for Weirs, New Hampshire, where arrived more dead than alive. She is at Newport now, and there are tender notes of pleasure with the Hall grandchildren, of reading and prayers with them on Sunday, of picnics and sailing parties. Still, in dreams, she calls back the lost daughter; still records with anxious care each visionary word and gesture. Dreamed this morning of Charles Sumner and dearest Julia. She was talking to me; part of the time reclining on a sort of lounge. I said to some one, This is our own dear Julia, feel how warm she is. .. .I think I said something about our wanting to see her oftener. She said pathetically, Can't you talk of me? I said, We do, darling. Not very often, I think was her reply. Then she seemed to come very near me, and I said to her, Darling, do they let you come here as often as you want to? She said, Not quite. I asked wh
James Freeman Clarke (search for this): chapter 22
ties of the place, and afterwards proclaimed that Mrs. Howe was the most agreeable woman he had ever met. And I never once opened my lips! she said. On June 10 she preached in Oakland: the one sermon which I have felt like preaching in these parts: Thou art Peter, and upon this rock. The house was well filled.... After service as I leaned over to speak to those who stopped to greet me, I saw one of our old church-members, who told me, with eyes full of tears, that our dear James Freeman Clarke is no more. This was like an ice-bolt; I could not realize it at first. A very tender history Did in your passing fall. Years of sweet converse, of following and dependence, end with this event. So we come to the last day at the ranch, the parting with the dear sister; the departure for San Francisco, laden with roses and good wishes. On the way eastward she stopped at Salt Lake City, and went to the Mormon Tabernacle; an enormous building with a roof like the back of
Caroline Tappan (search for this): chapter 22
ging solemn thoughts of the uncertainty of life, and sorrow for such misuse of its great gifts and opportunities as I am well conscious of. This has been a good year to me. It carried me to the Pacific slope, and showed me indeed a land of promise. It gave me an unexpected joy in the harmonious feelings toward me and the members of A. A.W. at the Detroit Congress. It has, alas! taken from me my dear pastor, most precious to me for help and instruction, and other dear and valued friends, notably Sarah Shaw Russell, Mrs. George Russell, widow of the Doctor's friend and college chum. Abby W. May and Carrie Tappan. Caroline Tappan was Caroline Sturgis, daughter of Captain William Sturgis, and sister of Ellen (Sturgis) Hooper,--member of the inmost Transcendentalist circle, and friend of Emerson, Ellery Channing, and Margaret Fuller. I desire to set my house in order, and be ready for my departure; thankful to live, or willing to cease from my mortal life when God so wills. . .
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