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August 2nd, 1895 AD (search for this): chapter 25
my midday rest, it became more clear to me that there is truth of sentiment and also intellectual truth. In Dr. Hedge's view, the inevitable mistakes of human intellect in its early unfolding were helpful to the development of true sentiment. Higher than this, however, must be the agreement of the two, prefigured perhaps in such sentences as Mercy and truth have kissed each other. This thought also came to me: Oh, God, no kingdom is worth praying for but thine. To Laura Oak Glen, August 2, 1895. Dearest Pidge, also Midge, ... I will condescend to inform you that I am well, that Flossy is very faithful in taking care of me, and that we are reading Bulwer's Pelham, the stupidest of novels. We are two thirds through with it, and how the author of Rienzi could have offered the public so dull a dish, even in his unripe youth, passes my understanding. You must not get too tired. Remember that no one will have mercy upon you unless you will have mercy upon yourself. We sit o
April 19th (search for this): chapter 25
blish a precedent. If one woman can be so disinterested and so wise, others can emulate her example. I, for one, feel that I shall not forget this forcible presentation of the aspect of such a character, of such a history. God send that her mantle may fall upon this whole community, stimulating each to do what he or she can for humanity. To Maud 241 Beacon Street, April 21, 1894. My dearest dear child, ... Let me tell you of the abolition of the old Fast Day and of the new holiday, April 19, ordained in its stead. This, you may remember, is the anniversary of the Battle of Lexington. The celebration here was quite on a grand scale. The bells of the old North Church were rung and the lanterns hung out. A horseman, personating Paul Revere, rode out to rouse the farmers of Concord and Lexington, and a sham fight, imitating the real one, actually came off with an immense concourse of spectators. The Daughters of the American Revolution had made me promise to go to their celeb
November 4th (search for this): chapter 25
treet, November 17, 1895. My darling child, ... I had a confused and weary time moving up from Newport, and my Southern journey followed hard upon. Mrs. Cheney, Eva Channing, Mrs. Bethune, and I started on October 31. Flossy joined us in New York. We reached Atlanta on Friday. Our meetings were held in the Woman's Building of the Atlanta Exposition, and were very pleasant, the Exposition being also well worth visiting. I spoke in the Unitarian Church on the Sunday following, and on November 4 we started for New Orleans which we reached the next morning. We were all to be entertained, and Mrs. King, our old friend, had written me a cordial invitation to stay with her. The whole family turned out to receive us, and we were made at home at once .... Mrs. King had always been most kind and loyal to me. Our days in New Orleans, only six in number, were delightful. I saw most of the old friends. . . . After the accident to Mrs. King and myself, I felt much like seeking my own heart
had a momentary sense of the sweetness and relief of the last lying down. This was a new experience to me, as I have been averse to any thought of death as opposed to the activity which I love. I now saw it as the termination of all fight and struggle, and prayed that in the life beyond I might pay some of the debts of affection and recompense which I have failed to make good in this life. Feeling a little like my old self to-day, I realize how far from well I have been for days past. July 27. Woke with an aching head.... Prayed that even in suffering I might still have work and worship. Alliteration is, I know, one of my weaknesses. I thought afterwards of a third W-, work, worship, welcome. These three words will do for a motto of the life which I now lead, in which these words stand for my ruling objects, welcome denoting hospitality in which I should be glad to be more forward than I have been of late.... July 28. Reading Mr. Hedge's review of Historic Christianity to-
April 21st, 1894 AD (search for this): chapter 25
hat her life has not taught us? The sermon, however, was most instructive. Such a life makes an epoch, and should establish a precedent. If one woman can be so disinterested and so wise, others can emulate her example. I, for one, feel that I shall not forget this forcible presentation of the aspect of such a character, of such a history. God send that her mantle may fall upon this whole community, stimulating each to do what he or she can for humanity. To Maud 241 Beacon Street, April 21, 1894. My dearest dear child, ... Let me tell you of the abolition of the old Fast Day and of the new holiday, April 19, ordained in its stead. This, you may remember, is the anniversary of the Battle of Lexington. The celebration here was quite on a grand scale. The bells of the old North Church were rung and the lanterns hung out. A horseman, personating Paul Revere, rode out to rouse the farmers of Concord and Lexington, and a sham fight, imitating the real one, actually came off wit
realize how far from well I have been for days past. July 27. Woke with an aching head.... Prayed that even in suffering I might still have work and worship. Alliteration is, I know, one of my weaknesses. I thought afterwards of a third W-, work, worship, welcome. These three words will do for a motto of the life which I now lead, in which these words stand for my ruling objects, welcome denoting hospitality in which I should be glad to be more forward than I have been of late.... July 28. Reading Mr. Hedge's review of Historic Christianity to-day, I felt puzzled by his showing of the usefulness of human errors and delusion in the great order of Providence. Lying down for my midday rest, it became more clear to me that there is truth of sentiment and also intellectual truth. In Dr. Hedge's view, the inevitable mistakes of human intellect in its early unfolding were helpful to the development of true sentiment. Higher than this, however, must be the agreement of the two, p
November 26th, 1894 AD (search for this): chapter 25
Association did and continues to do much good. She was its president to the close of her life, and in silent and lovely tribute to her memory the office has since then remained vacant. In the early nineties all Christendom was aroused by the outrages committed by the Turks in Armenia. From almost every Christian country rose a cry of horror: indignation meetings were called; protest, denunciation, and appeal were the order of the day. In Boston a meeting was held at Faneuil Hall (November 26, 1894), called together by the Boston Armenian Relief Committee. She was on the platform, and spoke from her heart. I could not, she says, stay away from this meeting. My heart was here, and I came, not so much to speak, as to hear what is to be done about this dreadful trouble. For something must be done. I have to pray God night and morning that He would find some way to stay this terrible tide of slaughter.... I recall the first action of Florence Nightingale when she went
April 10th (search for this): chapter 25
t, at least from the recent overstrain .... Twice I knelt and prayed that God would give me the use of my mind. An hour in sleep did something towards this and a good cup of tea put me quite on my feet.... April 8. In the late afternoon Harry, my son, came, and after some little preparation told me of the death of my dear sister Annie. I have been toiling and moiling to keep the engagements of this week, but here comes the great silence, and I must keep it for some days at least.... April 10. ... It suddenly occurred to me that this might be the hour, as this would surely be the day of dear Annie's funeral. So I found the 90th Psalm and the chapter in Corinthians, and sat and read them before her picture, remembering also Tennyson's lines:-- And Ave, Ave, Ave said Adieu, adieu, forever more. To Laura 241 Beacon Street, April 14, 1895. Buona Pasqua, Dear Child! ... I feel thankful that my darling died in her own home, apparently without suffering, and in the bosom of
November 17th, 1895 AD (search for this): chapter 25
ing to some function when a trolley car ran into the carriage, shaking her up badly and bruising her lame knee severely. It seemed imperative that she should rest for a few days, and hostess and daughter pleaded with her. Florence begged in particular that she would cancel her engagement to preach in the Unitarian Church; begged a little too insistently. I would n't, dear mother! Flossy, was the reply, you are you, and I am I! I shall preach on Sunday To Maud 241 Beacon Street, November 17, 1895. My darling child, ... I had a confused and weary time moving up from Newport, and my Southern journey followed hard upon. Mrs. Cheney, Eva Channing, Mrs. Bethune, and I started on October 31. Flossy joined us in New York. We reached Atlanta on Friday. Our meetings were held in the Woman's Building of the Atlanta Exposition, and were very pleasant, the Exposition being also well worth visiting. I spoke in the Unitarian Church on the Sunday following, and on November 4 we starte
I went to New York by a five-hour train, Godkin of the Nation taking care of me. He remembers your kind attentions to him when you met him in the Pullman with a broken ankle. March 30.... I awoke very early this morning, with a head so confused that I thought my brain had given out, at least from the recent overstrain .... Twice I knelt and prayed that God would give me the use of my mind. An hour in sleep did something towards this and a good cup of tea put me quite on my feet.... April 8. In the late afternoon Harry, my son, came, and after some little preparation told me of the death of my dear sister Annie. I have been toiling and moiling to keep the engagements of this week, but here comes the great silence, and I must keep it for some days at least.... April 10. ... It suddenly occurred to me that this might be the hour, as this would surely be the day of dear Annie's funeral. So I found the 90th Psalm and the chapter in Corinthians, and sat and read them before he
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