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ools and hospitals were established in Armenia,. and many children were placed in American homes, where they grew up happily, to citizenship. Nearly ten years later, a new outbreak of Turkish ferocity roused the Friends to new fervor, and once again her voice was lifted up in protest and appeaL She wrote to President Roosevelt, imploring him to send some one from some neighboring American consulate to investigate conditions. He did so, and his action prevented an impending massacre. In 1909, fresh persecutions brought the organization once more together. The Armenians of Boston reminded her of the help she had given before, and asked her to write to President Taft. This she promptly did. Briefly, this cause with so many others was to be relinquished only with life itself. On the fly-leaf of the Journal for 1894 is written: I take possession of the New Year in the name of Faith, Hope, and Charity. J. W. Howe. Head bewildered with correspondence, bills, etc. Must get out o
December 29th, 1895 AD (search for this): chapter 25
d we had much talk about Armenia. I said: If we two should go to England, would it do any good? I spoke only half in earnest. She said: If you would only go, I would go with you as your henchman. This set me thinking of a voyage to England and a crusade such as I made for Peace in 1872. I am, however, held forcibly here by engagements, and at my age, my bodily presence might be, as St. Paul says, contemptible. I must try to work in some other way. To Laura 241 Beacon Street, December 29, 1895. . . The mince pie was in the grand style, and has been faithfully devoured, a profound sense of duty forbidding me to neglect it .... I went to a fine musical party at Mrs. Montie Sears's on Thursday evening, 26th. Paderewski played, at first with strings a Septet or Septuor of Brahms', and then many things by himself. Somehow, I could not enjoy him much; he played miraculously, but did not seem to be in it. I am more than ever stirred up about the Armenians. The horrible mas
neighbors to hear them read papers. It was n't suffrage, but it was good government, which is about the same thing. The parlors looked very pretty. I should think seventy or eighty came and all were delighted. Did I write you that at Philadelphia she made the most admired speech of the occasion? She wore the brocade, finely made over, with big black velvet top sleeves and rhinestone comb, and they 'plauded and 'plauded, and I sat, grinning like a chessy cat, oh! so welly pleased. July 1. [Oak Glen.] Despite my severe fatigue went in town to church; desired in my mind to have some good abiding thought given me to work for and live by. The best thought that came to me was something like this: we are careful of our fortune and of our reputation. We are not careful enough of our lives. Society is built of these lives in which each should fit his or her place, like a stone fitly joined by the builder. We die, but the life we have lived remains, and helps to build society wel
March 30th (search for this): chapter 25
hanler house, which was Chanleresque as usual. Peter Marie gave me a fine dinner. Margaret went with me, in white satin. I wore my black and white which you remember well. It still looks well enough. I wore some beautiful lace which I got, through dear sister Annie, from some distressed lace woman in England. I went to New York by a five-hour train, Godkin of the Nation taking care of me. He remembers your kind attentions to him when you met him in the Pullman with a broken ankle. March 30.... I awoke very early this morning, with a head so confused that I thought my brain had given out, at least from the recent overstrain .... Twice I knelt and prayed that God would give me the use of my mind. An hour in sleep did something towards this and a good cup of tea put me quite on my feet.... April 8. In the late afternoon Harry, my son, came, and after some little preparation told me of the death of my dear sister Annie. I have been toiling and moiling to keep the engagements
December 18th, 1895 AD (search for this): chapter 25
now, and I am able to go about as usual. New Orleans has improved much since we were there. The old mule cars have disappeared, and much of the mud. People feel very glad that the Lottery has been got rid of, but they are bitter against the sugar trust. Mrs. Walmsley received our A. A.W. ladies very cordially at her fine house and sent me beautiful flowers.... I spoke in the Unitarian Church on Sunday, so I had my heart's desire fulfilled.... To Laura 241 Beacon Street, Boston, December 18, 1895. 'Pon my word and honor, couldn't come at it before . . . Last week I spoke straight along, every day until Saturday; was dreadfully tired. This week have n't spoken at all. Oh, I forgot, lecture on Race problems in Europe, before my own Club. Have sent the Armenians the money for a lecture given at Nahant last week, $10. Oh! the difficult dollars! ... December 28. ...Mrs. Barrows dined tete-a-tete with me, and we had much talk about Armenia. I said: If we two should go to E
October 31st (search for this): chapter 25
ment of Women met in New Orleans this year, but first she must go with Florence to the Council of the General Federation of Women's Clubs at Atlanta, Georgia, where a great exposition was also being held. The expedition began with disaster. October 31. Left Boston by Colonial train at 9 A. M. Rolled down my front steps, striking my forehead and bruising myself generally, in getting to the carriage.. .. After taking her part in the Council and visiting the Exposition, she proceeded to New h on Sunday To Maud 241 Beacon Street, November 17, 1895. My darling child, ... I had a confused and weary time moving up from Newport, and my Southern journey followed hard upon. Mrs. Cheney, Eva Channing, Mrs. Bethune, and I started on October 31. Flossy joined us in New York. We reached Atlanta on Friday. Our meetings were held in the Woman's Building of the Atlanta Exposition, and were very pleasant, the Exposition being also well worth visiting. I spoke in the Unitarian Church on
January 6th (search for this): chapter 25
prise was distinctly heard all over the house. You may easily imagine that I enjoyed this very much, although it was rather an anxious moment when I stepped forward to speak.... We are all much shocked at the death of dear Robert Louis Stevenson of which you will have heard before this reaches you. What a loss to literature! January 1, 1895. I was awake very early and made the prayer that during this year I might not say one uncharitable word, or be guilty of one ungenerous action. January 6. .. My afternoon service at the Women's Educational and Industrial Union. ... The day was very stormy and Mrs. Lee met me at the carriage, offering to excuse me from speaking to the five persons who were in attendance. I felt not to disappoint those five, and presently twenty-three were present, and we had a pleasant talk, after the reading of the short sermon. January 8.... Felt much discouraged at waking, the long vista of work opening out before me, each task calling for some origin
, Edward L. Pierce, Frank B. Sanborn, Annie Fields, E. Benjamin Andrews, Lillie B. Chace Wyman, Samuel L. Clemens, and Joseph H. Twitchell. James Russell Lowell, writing to Francis J. Garrison in 1891, says: Between mote and beam, I think this time Russia has the latter in her eye, though God knows we have motes enough in ours. So you may take my name even if it be in vain, as I think it will be. It was through this society that she made the acquaintance of Mme. Breschkovskaya, Now (1915) a political prisoner in Siberia: she escaped, but was recaptured and later removed to a more remote place of imprisonment. the Russian patriot whose sufferings and sacrifices have endeared her to all lovers of freedom. The two women felt instant sympathy with each other. Mme. Breschkovskaya came to 241 Beacon Street more than once, and they had much talk together. On one of these occasions our mother was asked to play some of her own compositions. Her fingers strayed from one thing to a
January 7th (search for this): chapter 25
musical party at Mrs. Montie Sears's on Thursday evening, 26th. Paderewski played, at first with strings a Septet or Septuor of Brahms', and then many things by himself. Somehow, I could not enjoy him much; he played miraculously, but did not seem to be in it. I am more than ever stirred up about the Armenians. The horrible massacres go on, just the same, and Christendom stands still. Oh! a curse on human selfishness! . . . We are to have a dramatic entertainment for the Red Cross on Jan. 7th at Boston Theatre.... December 29 ... I determined to-day to try to work more systematically for the Armenians. Think I will write to Clara Barton and Senator Hoar, also to Lady Henry Somerset, an arraignment of Christendom for its supineness towards the Turks, an allusion to Coeur de Lion and the ancient Crusaders.... December 30. ... Clara Barton held a meeting for the Red Cross ... I was the last speaker and I think that, as sometimes happens, my few words brought things to a cri
January 8th (search for this): chapter 25
de the prayer that during this year I might not say one uncharitable word, or be guilty of one ungenerous action. January 6. .. My afternoon service at the Women's Educational and Industrial Union. ... The day was very stormy and Mrs. Lee met me at the carriage, offering to excuse me from speaking to the five persons who were in attendance. I felt not to disappoint those five, and presently twenty-three were present, and we had a pleasant talk, after the reading of the short sermon. January 8.... Felt much discouraged at waking, the long vista of work opening out before me, each task calling for some original brain-work, I mean for some special thought worth presenting to an audience. While I puzzled, a thought came to me for this day's suffrage speech: The kingdom cometh not with observation. The silent, gradual, wonderful growth of public sentiment regarding woman suffrage, the spreading sense of the great universal harmony which Christ delivered to us in the words and act
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