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Eva Channing (search for this): chapter 25
uld rest for a few days, and hostess and daughter pleaded with her. Florence begged in particular that she would cancel her engagement to preach in the Unitarian Church; begged a little too insistently. I would n't, dear mother! Flossy, was the reply, you are you, and I am I! I shall preach on Sunday To Maud 241 Beacon Street, November 17, 1895. My darling child, ... I had a confused and weary time moving up from Newport, and my Southern journey followed hard upon. Mrs. Cheney, Eva Channing, Mrs. Bethune, and I started on October 31. Flossy joined us in New York. We reached Atlanta on Friday. Our meetings were held in the Woman's Building of the Atlanta Exposition, and were very pleasant, the Exposition being also well worth visiting. I spoke in the Unitarian Church on the Sunday following, and on November 4 we started for New Orleans which we reached the next morning. We were all to be entertained, and Mrs. King, our old friend, had written me a cordial invitation to s
Mary Hemenway (search for this): chapter 25
pounded fearfully. I said, He ought to play with his boots on his hands. He played two curious compositions of Liszt's: St. Francis's Sermon to the Birds and to the Fishes-much roaring as of old ocean in the second. Boston. Attended Mrs. Mary Hemenway's funeral in the morning. ... A great loss she is, but her life has been a great gain. Would that more rich men had such daughters! That more rich women had such a heart! . . C. G. A. preached a funeral sermon on Mrs. Hemenway. As he Mrs. Hemenway. As he opened his lips, I said to myself, What can he teach us that her life has not taught us? The sermon, however, was most instructive. Such a life makes an epoch, and should establish a precedent. If one woman can be so disinterested and so wise, others can emulate her example. I, for one, feel that I shall not forget this forcible presentation of the aspect of such a character, of such a history. God send that her mantle may fall upon this whole community, stimulating each to do what he or
George F. Hoar (search for this): chapter 25
lf. Somehow, I could not enjoy him much; he played miraculously, but did not seem to be in it. I am more than ever stirred up about the Armenians. The horrible massacres go on, just the same, and Christendom stands still. Oh! a curse on human selfishness! . . . We are to have a dramatic entertainment for the Red Cross on Jan. 7th at Boston Theatre.... December 29 ... I determined to-day to try to work more systematically for the Armenians. Think I will write to Clara Barton and Senator Hoar, also to Lady Henry Somerset, an arraignment of Christendom for its supineness towards the Turks, an allusion to Coeur de Lion and the ancient Crusaders.... December 30. ... Clara Barton held a meeting for the Red Cross ... I was the last speaker and I think that, as sometimes happens, my few words brought things to a crisis, for the moment only, indeed, but even that may help. December 31. Rising early and with a mind somewhat confused and clouded, I went to my window. As I looke
Jenny Nelson (search for this): chapter 25
and the lanterns hung out. A horseman, personating Paul Revere, rode out to rouse the farmers of Concord and Lexington, and a sham fight, imitating the real one, actually came off with an immense concourse of spectators. The Daughters of the American Revolution had made me promise to go to their celebration at the Old South, where I sat upon the platform with Mrs. Sam Eliot, Regent, and with the two orators of the day, Professor Channing and Edward Hale. I wore the changeable silk that Jenny Nelson made, the Gardner cashmere, and the bonnet which little you made for me last summer. McAlvin refreshed it a little, and it looked most proud. Sam Eliot, who presided, said to me, Why, Julia, you look like the queen that I said you were, long ago. If I could do so, I would introduce you as the Queen. I tell you all this in order that you may know that I was all right as to appearance. I was to read a poem, but had not managed to compose one, so I copied out Our country from Later Lyric
and a sham fight, imitating the real one, actually came off with an immense concourse of spectators. The Daughters of the American Revolution had made me promise to go to their celebration at the Old South, where I sat upon the platform with Mrs. Sam Eliot, Regent, and with the two orators of the day, Professor Channing and Edward Hale. I wore the changeable silk that Jenny Nelson made, the Gardner cashmere, and the bonnet which little you made for me last summer. McAlvin refreshed it a little, and it looked most proud. Sam Eliot, who presided, said to me, Why, Julia, you look like the queen that I said you were, long ago. If I could do so, I would introduce you as the Queen. I tell you all this in order that you may know that I was all right as to appearance. I was to read a poem, but had not managed to compose one, so I copied out Our country from Later Lyrics, and read it as I was never able to read it before. For the first time, it told upon the audience. This was because
George W. De Long (search for this): chapter 25
o my birthday. The Springfield republican has a bit about it, with a good and gratifying poem from Sanborn. Really, dear, between you and me what a old humbug it is! But no matter — if people will take me for much better than I am, I can't help it, and must only try to live up to my reputation. ... I received a good letter from you, a little scolding at first, but soft rebukes with blessings ended, as Longfellow describes the admonitions of his first wife.... At the Suffrage Festival, Governor Long presided, and in introducing me waved a branch of lilies, saying, In the beauty of the lilies she is still, at seventy-five. Now that I call handsome, don't you?... Flossy had a very successful afternoon tea while I was with her. She had three ladies of the Civitas Club and invited about one hundred of her neighbors to hear them read papers. It was n't suffrage, but it was good government, which is about the same thing. The parlors looked very pretty. I should think seventy or eig
Buona Pasqua (search for this): chapter 25
iling to keep the engagements of this week, but here comes the great silence, and I must keep it for some days at least.... April 10. ... It suddenly occurred to me that this might be the hour, as this would surely be the day of dear Annie's funeral. So I found the 90th Psalm and the chapter in Corinthians, and sat and read them before her picture, remembering also Tennyson's lines:-- And Ave, Ave, Ave said Adieu, adieu, forever more. To Laura 241 Beacon Street, April 14, 1895. Buona Pasqua, Dear Child! ... I feel thankful that my darling died in her own home, apparently without suffering, and in the bosom of her beloved family. She has lived out her sweet life, and while the loss to all who loved her is great, we must be willing to commit our dear ones to God, as we commit ourselves. The chill of age, no doubt, prevents my feeling as I should once have done, and the feeling that she has only passed in a little before me, lessens the sense of separation. 12.25. I ha
Montie Sears (search for this): chapter 25
enchman. This set me thinking of a voyage to England and a crusade such as I made for Peace in 1872. I am, however, held forcibly here by engagements, and at my age, my bodily presence might be, as St. Paul says, contemptible. I must try to work in some other way. To Laura 241 Beacon Street, December 29, 1895. . . The mince pie was in the grand style, and has been faithfully devoured, a profound sense of duty forbidding me to neglect it .... I went to a fine musical party at Mrs. Montie Sears's on Thursday evening, 26th. Paderewski played, at first with strings a Septet or Septuor of Brahms', and then many things by himself. Somehow, I could not enjoy him much; he played miraculously, but did not seem to be in it. I am more than ever stirred up about the Armenians. The horrible massacres go on, just the same, and Christendom stands still. Oh! a curse on human selfishness! . . . We are to have a dramatic entertainment for the Red Cross on Jan. 7th at Boston Theatre...
Charles Eliot Norton (search for this): chapter 25
a ladder to shave one's self. I was at Providence on Friday to meet a literary club of ladies. I read to them the greater part of my play, Hippolytus, written the summer before Sammy was born, for Edwin Booth. It seemed very ghostly to go back to the ambitions of that time, but the audience, a parlor one, expressed great satisfaction.... I 'fesses that I did attend the Bryant Centenary Festival at Cummington, Mass. I read a poem written for the occasion. Charles Dudley Warner and Charles Eliot Norton were there, and Parke Godwin presided. August 31. To Newport with Flossy, taking my screed with me, to the meeting of Colonial Dames, at the rooms of the Historical Society, one of which is the old Seventh-Day Baptist Church, which my greats grandfather, Governor Samuel Ward, used to attend. ... Bishop Clarke made the closing address, full of good sense, sentiment and wit — a wonderful man for eighty-two years of age. To Laura Oak Glen, September 6, 1894. Q. What has bee
Johannes Brahms (search for this): chapter 25
m, however, held forcibly here by engagements, and at my age, my bodily presence might be, as St. Paul says, contemptible. I must try to work in some other way. To Laura 241 Beacon Street, December 29, 1895. . . The mince pie was in the grand style, and has been faithfully devoured, a profound sense of duty forbidding me to neglect it .... I went to a fine musical party at Mrs. Montie Sears's on Thursday evening, 26th. Paderewski played, at first with strings a Septet or Septuor of Brahms', and then many things by himself. Somehow, I could not enjoy him much; he played miraculously, but did not seem to be in it. I am more than ever stirred up about the Armenians. The horrible massacres go on, just the same, and Christendom stands still. Oh! a curse on human selfishness! . . . We are to have a dramatic entertainment for the Red Cross on Jan. 7th at Boston Theatre.... December 29 ... I determined to-day to try to work more systematically for the Armenians. Think I wi
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