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lent party to all our bargains. [Emerson.] I find this passage in his essay on Compensation to-day for the first time, having written my essay on Moral Triangulation of the Third Party some thirty years ago. March 26. Dined with Mrs. McCreary--the Duke of San Martino took me in to dinner-Monsignor Dennis O'Connell sat on the other side of me. I had an interesting talk with him. Mrs. McCreary sang my Battle Hymn. They begged me to recite The Flag, which I did. Mrs. Pearse, daughter of Mario and Grisi, sang delightfully. March 30. A fine luncheon party given by Mrs. Iddings, wife of the American Secretary of Embassy at the Grand Hotel. Mme. Ristori was there; I had some glimpses of reminiscence with her. I met her with La terribila Medea, which I so well remember hearing from her. I presently quoted her toast in La Locandiera, of which she repeated the last two lines. Maud had arranged to have Mrs. Hurlburt help me home. Contessa Spinola also offered, but I got off alone,
Jessie Cochrane (search for this): chapter 27
the ladies present expressed the desire to have a small and select club of women in Rome. Maud volunteered to make the first effort, with Mme. DesGrange and Jessie Cochrane to help her. December 12. Bessie Crawford brought her children to see me. Very fine little creatures, the eldest boy Harold Crawford, who was killed inilgrimage to the shrine of a certain Madonna, feeling sure that it was to her that she owed her cure. January 26. The day of my reading before the Club, at Jessie Cochrane's rooms. I read my lecture over very carefully in the forenoon and got into the spirit of it. The gathering was a large one, very attentive, and mostly very Queen, returning from the review of troops. They were coldly received. She wore crimson velvet — he was on horseback and in uniform.... March 9. Club at Jessie Cochrane's; young Loyson, son of Pere Hyacinthe, gave an interesting lecture on the religion of Ancient Rome, which he traced back to its rude Latin beginning; the Sab
Henry George (search for this): chapter 27
rt's reception.--Talked with Countess Blank, an American married to a Pole. She had much to say of the piety of her Arab servant, who, she says, swallows fire, cuts himself with sharp things, etc., as acts of devotion!! Met Mr. Trench, son of the late Archbishop, Rev. Chevenix Trench. He has been Tennyson's publisher. Did not like T. personally — said he was often rude — read his own poems aloud constantly and very badly; said, No man is a hero to his publisher. Told about his sale of Henry George's book, a cheap edition, one hundred and fifty thousand copies sold in England. February 18. Have done a good morning's work and read in the Nineteenth Century an article on Nelson, and one on the new astronomy. St. Thomas Aquinas's advice regarding the election of an abbot from three candidates:-- What manner of man is the first? Doctissimus. Doceat, says St. Thomas. And the second? Sanctissimus. Oret! and the third? Prudentissimus! Regat! Let him rule! says
Cardinal Satolli (search for this): chapter 27
Mr. Heywood held an office in the Papal Court, and had a papal title which he was wise enough not to use in general society. He was an American, a Harvard graduate of the class of 1855. His chief occupation, outside of his duties at the Vatican, was the collection of a fine library. His house was a rendezvous of Black I. e., Clerical. society. He lived in much state and entertained with brilliant formality. Among the great social events of that winter was his reception given for Cardinal Satolli, who arrived dressed in splendid vestments, escorted by his suite. The hostess courtesied to the ground and kissed the ring on his finger. All the other Catholic ladies followed suit. Sitting very straight in her chair, our mother bided her time; finally the Cardinal was brought to her. He was a genial, courteous man and very soon they were deep in friendly talk. Though she disliked the Roman hierarchy as an institution, she counted many friends among the priests of Rome. January
seems a very sincere man: has an earlier service for Italians, well attended. On my way home, stopped at Gargiulo's and bought a ragged but very good copy of the Divina Commedia, unbound, with Dore's illustrations. February 26. To tea at Mrs. Hazeltine's where met William Allen Butler, author of Nothing to weara bright-eyed, conversable man. Have a sitting to Anderson. When I returned from Mrs. Hazeltine's I found Hall Caine.... He told much about Gabriel Rossetti, with whom he had much toMrs. Hazeltine's I found Hall Caine.... He told much about Gabriel Rossetti, with whom he had much to do. Rossetti was a victim of chloral, and Caine was set to keep him from it, except in discreet doses. March 4. Went to see the King and Queen, returning from the review of troops. They were coldly received. She wore crimson velvet — he was on horseback and in uniform.... March 9. Club at Jessie Cochrane's; young Loyson, son of Pere Hyacinthe, gave an interesting lecture on the religion of Ancient Rome, which he traced back to its rude Latin beginning; the Sabines, he thought, introduce
E. Benjamin Andrews (search for this): chapter 27
much fancied. April 10. Easter Sunday, passed quietly at home. Had an early walk on the terrace. ... A good talk with Hamilton Aide, who told me of the Spartali family. In the afternoon to Lady Kenmare's reception and later to dine with the Lindall Winthrops. April 11. In the afternoon Harriet Monroe, of Chicago, came and read her play — a parlor drama, ingenious and well written. The audience were much pleased with it. April 13.... In the evening dined with Theodore Davis and Mrs. Andrews. Davis showed us his treasures gathered on the Nile shore and gave me a scarab. April 18. .. Went to hear Canon Farrar on the Inferno of Dante — the lecture very scholarly and good. April 22. With Anderson to the Vatican, to see the Pinturicchio frescoes, which are very interesting. He designed the tiling for the floors, which is beautiful in color, matching well with the frescoes — these represent scenes in the life of the Virgin and of St. Catherine.... April 24. To Miss Lei<
Theodore Parker (search for this): chapter 27
y carefully in the forenoon and got into the spirit of it. The gathering was a large one, very attentive, and mostly very appreciative. The paper was Woman in the Greek drama. January 31. Have made a special prayer that my mind may be less occupied with my own shortcomings, and more with all that keeps our best hope alive. Felt little able to write, but produced a good page on the principle nulla dies sine linea. February 4. Hard sledding for words todaymade out something about Theodore Parker. February 7. Wrote some pages of introduction for the Symposium — played a rubber of whist with L. Terry; then to afternoon tea with Mrs. Thorndike, where I met the first Monsignor [Dennis] O'Connell, with whom I had a long talk on the woman question, in which he seems much interested. He tells me of a friend, Zahm by name, now gone to a place in Indiana, who has biographies of the historical women of Bologna. February 9. Club at Mrs. Broadwood's. I read my Plea for Humor, which
Pere Hyacinthe (search for this): chapter 27
n. Have a sitting to Anderson. When I returned from Mrs. Hazeltine's I found Hall Caine.... He told much about Gabriel Rossetti, with whom he had much to do. Rossetti was a victim of chloral, and Caine was set to keep him from it, except in discreet doses. March 4. Went to see the King and Queen, returning from the review of troops. They were coldly received. She wore crimson velvet — he was on horseback and in uniform.... March 9. Club at Jessie Cochrane's; young Loyson, son of Pere Hyacinthe, gave an interesting lecture on the religion of Ancient Rome, which he traced back to its rude Latin beginning; the Sabines, he thought, introduced into it one element of spirituality. Its mythology was borrowed from Greece and from the Etruscans — later from Egypt and the East. The Primitive Aryan religion was the worship of ancestors. This also we see in Rome. A belief in immortality appears in the true Aryan faith. Man, finding himself human, and related to the divine, felt that
Florence Marion (search for this): chapter 27
d to give, passed off pleasantly.... Most of the ladies present expressed the desire to have a small and select club of women in Rome. Maud volunteered to make the first effort, with Mme. DesGrange and Jessie Cochrane to help her. December 12. Bessie Crawford brought her children to see me. Very fine little creatures, the eldest boy Harold Crawford, who was killed in the present war (1915), fighting for the Allies. handsome, dark like his mother, the others blond and a good deal like Marion in his early life. December 14. In the afternoon drove with Jack to visit Villegas. Found a splendid house with absolutely no fire — the cold of the studio was tomb-like. A fire was lighted in a stove and cakes were served, with some excellent Amontillado wine, which I think saved my life. December 18. When I lay down to take my nap before dinner, I had a sudden thought-vision of the glory of God in the face of Jesus Christ. I seemed to see how the human could in a way reflect the g
t a part in Roman society, the Jonkheer John Loudon, Secretary of the Netherlands Legation, was one of her favorite visitors; there are frequent mentions of his singing, which she took pleasure in accompanying. January 15. We had a pleasant drive to Villa Madama where we bought fresh eggs from a peasant. Cola cut much greenery for us with which Maud had our rooms decorated. Attended Mrs. Heywood's reception, where met some pleasant people — the Scudder party; an English Catholic named Christmas, who visits the poor, and reports the misery among them as very great; a young priest from Boston, Monsignor O'Connell Now Cardinal O'Connell.; a Mr. and Mrs. Mulhorn, Irish,--he strong on statistics, she a writer on Celtic antiquities, -has published a paper on the Celtic origin of the Divina Commedia, and has written one on the discovery of America by Irish Danes, five hundred years before Columbus. Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Heywood lived a few doors from the Rusticucci in the Palazzo Gir
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