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J. W. Hurlburt (search for this): chapter 27
and Princess Poggia-Suasa. February 11. Read over my paper on Optimism and Pessimism and have got into the spirit of it. Maud's friends came at 3 P. M., among them Christian Ross, the painter, with Bjornstjerne Bjornson. February 16. To Mrs. Hurlburt's reception.--Talked with Countess Blank, an American married to a Pole. She had much to say of the piety of her Arab servant, who, she says, swallows fire, cuts himself with sharp things, etc., as acts of devotion!! Met Mr. Trench, son of t; I had some glimpses of reminiscence with her. I met her with La terribila Medea, which I so well remember hearing from her. I presently quoted her toast in La Locandiera, of which she repeated the last two lines. Maud had arranged to have Mrs. Hurlburt help me home. Contessa Spinola also offered, but I got off alone, came home in time to hear most of Professor Pansotti's lecture on the Gregorian music, which, though technical, was interesting. March 31. I woke up at one, after vividly d
e. Felt little able to write, but produced a good page on the principle nulla dies sine linea. February 4. Hard sledding for words todaymade out something about Theodore Parker. February 7. Wrote some pages of introduction for the Symposium — played a rubber of whist with L. Terry; then to afternoon tea with Mrs. Thorndike, where I met the first Monsignor [Dennis] O'Connell, with whom I had a long talk on the woman question, in which he seems much interested. He tells me of a friend, Zahm by name, now gone to a place in Indiana, who has biographies of the historical women of Bologna. February 9. Club at Mrs. Broadwood's. I read my Plea for Humor, which seemed to please the audience very much, especially Princess Talleyrand and Princess Poggia-Suasa. February 11. Read over my paper on Optimism and Pessimism and have got into the spirit of it. Maud's friends came at 3 P. M., among them Christian Ross, the painter, with Bjornstjerne Bjornson. February 16. To Mrs. Hurlbur
I lay down to take my nap before dinner, I had a sudden thought-vision of the glory of God in the face of Jesus Christ. I seemed to see how the human could in a way reflect the glory of the divine, giving not a mechanical, but an affectional and spiritual re-showing of the great unfathomable glory. I need not say that I had no sleep — I wish the glimpse then given me might remain in my mind. December 21. Feeling much better in health, I determined to take up my Reminiscences again. Mme. Rose passed the evening with me. She told me that Pio Nono had endorsed the Rosminian philosophy, which had had quite a following in the Church, Cardinal Hohenlohe having been very prominent in this. When Leo XIII was elected, the Jesuits came to him and promised that he should have a Jubilee if he would take part against the Rosminian ideas, and put the books on the Index Expurgatorius, the which he promptly did. Hohenlohe is supposed to have been the real hero of the poisoning described in Z
eld, Massachusetts. Her husband has been an officer of the King's bersaglieri. Before the unification of Italy, he was sent to Perugia to reclaim deserters from among the recruits for the Italian army. Cardinal Pecci was then living near Perugia. Count Catucci called to assure him with great politeness that he would take his word and not search his premises. The Cardinal treated him with equal politeness, but declined to continue the acquaintance after his removal to Rome, when he became Pope in 1878. January 12. The first meeting of our little circleat Miss Leigh Smith's, 17 Trinita dei Monti. I presided and introduced Richard Norton, who gave an interesting account of the American School of Archaeology at Athens, and of the excavations at Athens.... Anderson to dine. He took a paper outline of my profile, wishing to model a bust of me. The Winthrop Chanlers were passing the winter in Rome; this added much to her pleasure. The depression gradually disappeared, and she fo
Du Maurier (search for this): chapter 27
ever with geniality and kindness. Mr. Stillman was then the Roman correspondent of the London Times, a position only second in importance to that of the British Ambassador. His tall, lean figure, stooping shoulders,--where a pet squirrel often perched,--his long grey beard and keen eyes were familiar to the Romans of that day. His house was a meeting-place for artists and litterati. Mrs. Stillman our mother had formerly known as the beautiful Marie Spartali, the friend of Rossetti and Du Maurier, the idol of literary and artistic London. A warm friendship grew up between them. Together they frequented the antiquaries, gleaning small treasures of ancient lace and peasant jewels. I bought this by the Muse Stillman's advice : this explanation guaranteed the wisdom of purchasing the small rose diamond ring set in black enamel. December 9. Dined with Daisy Chanler. We met there one Brewster and Hendrik Anderson. After dinner came Palmer [son of Courtland] and his sister. He
, which she took pleasure in accompanying. January 15. We had a pleasant drive to Villa Madama where we bought fresh eggs from a peasant. Cola cut much greenery for us with which Maud had our rooms decorated. Attended Mrs. Heywood's reception, where met some pleasant people — the Scudder party; an English Catholic named Christmas, who visits the poor, and reports the misery among them as very great; a young priest from Boston, Monsignor O'Connell Now Cardinal O'Connell.; a Mr. and Mrs. Mulhorn, Irish,--he strong on statistics, she a writer on Celtic antiquities, -has published a paper on the Celtic origin of the Divina Commedia, and has written one on the discovery of America by Irish Danes, five hundred years before Columbus. Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Heywood lived a few doors from the Rusticucci in the Palazzo Giraud Torlonia, one of the finest Roman palaces. Mr. Heywood held an office in the Papal Court, and had a papal title which he was wise enough not to use in general soci
Paul Sabatier (search for this): chapter 27
y generations of English and American residents the most advantageous dwelling in Rome. On Sunday mornings, when the bells of Rome thrilled the air with the call to prayer, a group of exiles from many lands gathered in the pleasant English-looking drawingroom. From the windows they could look down upon the flower-decked Piazza di Spagna, hear the song of the nightingales in the Villa Medici, breathe the perfume of violets and almond blossoms from the Pincio. This morning, or another, Paul Sabatier was among the listeners, a grave, gracious man, a Savoyard pastor, whose Life of Saint Francis of Assisi had set all Rome talking. April 25. To lunch with the Drapers. Had some good talk with Mr. D. [the American Ambassador]. He was brought up at Hopedale in the Community, of which his father was a member, his mother not altogether acquiescing. He went into our Civil War when only twenty years of age, having the day before married a wife. He was badly wounded in the battle of the W
Contessa Spinola (search for this): chapter 27
ag, which I did. Mrs. Pearse, daughter of Mario and Grisi, sang delightfully. March 30. A fine luncheon party given by Mrs. Iddings, wife of the American Secretary of Embassy at the Grand Hotel. Mme. Ristori was there; I had some glimpses of reminiscence with her. I met her with La terribila Medea, which I so well remember hearing from her. I presently quoted her toast in La Locandiera, of which she repeated the last two lines. Maud had arranged to have Mrs. Hurlburt help me home. Contessa Spinola also offered, but I got off alone, came home in time to hear most of Professor Pansotti's lecture on the Gregorian music, which, though technical, was interesting. March 31. I woke up at one, after vividly dreaming of my father and Dr. Francis. My father came in, and said to me that he wished to speak to Miss Julia alone. I trembled, as I so often did, lest I was about to receive some well-merited rebuke. He said that he wished my sister and me to stay at home more. I saw the two
remises. The Cardinal treated him with equal politeness, but declined to continue the acquaintance after his removal to Rome, when he became Pope in 1878. January 12. The first meeting of our little circleat Miss Leigh Smith's, 17 Trinita dei Monti. I presided and introduced Richard Norton, who gave an interesting account of the American School of Archaeology at Athens, and of the excavations at Athens.... Anderson to dine. He took a paper outline of my profile, wishing to model a bust ofe sermon by reading one of the parables in my Later Lyrics, Once, where men of high pretension, etc.... This was one of several occasions when she read a sermon at the house of Miss Leigh Smith, a stanch Unitarian, who lived at the Trinita dea Monti in the house near the top of the Spanish Steps, held by generations of English and American residents the most advantageous dwelling in Rome. On Sunday mornings, when the bells of Rome thrilled the air with the call to prayer, a group of exiles
Giulia Grisi (search for this): chapter 27
to all our bargains. [Emerson.] I find this passage in his essay on Compensation to-day for the first time, having written my essay on Moral Triangulation of the Third Party some thirty years ago. March 26. Dined with Mrs. McCreary--the Duke of San Martino took me in to dinner-Monsignor Dennis O'Connell sat on the other side of me. I had an interesting talk with him. Mrs. McCreary sang my Battle Hymn. They begged me to recite The Flag, which I did. Mrs. Pearse, daughter of Mario and Grisi, sang delightfully. March 30. A fine luncheon party given by Mrs. Iddings, wife of the American Secretary of Embassy at the Grand Hotel. Mme. Ristori was there; I had some glimpses of reminiscence with her. I met her with La terribila Medea, which I so well remember hearing from her. I presently quoted her toast in La Locandiera, of which she repeated the last two lines. Maud had arranged to have Mrs. Hurlburt help me home. Contessa Spinola also offered, but I got off alone, came home
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