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Marchesa Viti (search for this): chapter 27
the Via Gregoriana. Among the guests one met at Lady Kenmare's was a dark, handsome Monsignore who spoke English like an Oxford Don, and looked like a Torquemada. Later he became Papal Secretary of State and Cardinal Merry del Val. May 2. Have worked as usual. A pleasant late drive. Dined with Eleutherio, Her brother-in-law, Luther Terry. Daisy Chanler, and Dr. Bull; whist afterwards; news of an engagement and victory for us off Manila. May 4.... We dined with Marchese and Marchesa de Viti de Marco at Palazzo Orsini. Their rooms are very fine, one hung with beautiful crimson damask. An author, Pascarello, was present, who has written comic poems in the Romanesque dialect, the principal one a mock narrative of the discovery of America by Columbus. Our host is a very intelligent man, much occupied with questions of political economy, of which science he is professor at the Collegio Romano. His wife, an American, is altogether pleasing. He spoke of the present Spanish W
Harold Crawford (search for this): chapter 27
e Trevi Fountain and to the Coliseum, where we walked awhile. Ladies came to hear me talk about Women's Clubs. This talk, which I had rather dreaded to give, passed off pleasantly.... Most of the ladies present expressed the desire to have a small and select club of women in Rome. Maud volunteered to make the first effort, with Mme. DesGrange and Jessie Cochrane to help her. December 12. Bessie Crawford brought her children to see me. Very fine little creatures, the eldest boy Harold Crawford, who was killed in the present war (1915), fighting for the Allies. handsome, dark like his mother, the others blond and a good deal like Marion in his early life. December 14. In the afternoon drove with Jack to visit Villegas. Found a splendid house with absolutely no fire — the cold of the studio was tomb-like. A fire was lighted in a stove and cakes were served, with some excellent Amontillado wine, which I think saved my life. December 18. When I lay down to take my nap bef
Indiana, who has biographies of the historical women of Bologna. February 9. Club at Mrs. Broadwood's. I read my Plea for Humor, which seemed to please the audience very much, especially Princess Talleyrand and Princess Poggia-Suasa. February 11. Read over my paper on Optimism and Pessimism and have got into the spirit of it. Maud's friends came at 3 P. M., among them Christian Ross, the painter, with Bjornstjerne Bjornson. February 16. To Mrs. Hurlburt's reception.--Talked with Countess Blank, an American married to a Pole. She had much to say of the piety of her Arab servant, who, she says, swallows fire, cuts himself with sharp things, etc., as acts of devotion!! Met Mr. Trench, son of the late Archbishop, Rev. Chevenix Trench. He has been Tennyson's publisher. Did not like T. personally — said he was often rude — read his own poems aloud constantly and very badly; said, No man is a hero to his publisher. Told about his sale of Henry George's book, a cheap edition, one
of Egypt. The Ladies Thynne were passing the winter with their cousin, the Countess of Kenmare, at her pleasant apartment in the Via Gregoriana. Among the guests one met at Lady Kenmare's was a dark, handsome Monsignore who spoke English like an Oxford Don, and looked like a Torquemada. Later he became Papal Secretary of State and Cardinal Merry del Val. May 2. Have worked as usual. A pleasant late drive. Dined with Eleutherio, Her brother-in-law, Luther Terry. Daisy Chanler, and Dr. Bull; whist afterwards; news of an engagement and victory for us off Manila. May 4.... We dined with Marchese and Marchesa de Viti de Marco at Palazzo Orsini. Their rooms are very fine, one hung with beautiful crimson damask. An author, Pascarello, was present, who has written comic poems in the Romanesque dialect, the principal one a mock narrative of the discovery of America by Columbus. Our host is a very intelligent man, much occupied with questions of political economy, of which scien
John Wakefield Francis (search for this): chapter 27
iscence with her. I met her with La terribila Medea, which I so well remember hearing from her. I presently quoted her toast in La Locandiera, of which she repeated the last two lines. Maud had arranged to have Mrs. Hurlburt help me home. Contessa Spinola also offered, but I got off alone, came home in time to hear most of Professor Pansotti's lecture on the Gregorian music, which, though technical, was interesting. March 31. I woke up at one, after vividly dreaming of my father and Dr. Francis. My father came in, and said to me that he wished to speak to Miss Julia alone. I trembled, as I so often did, lest I was about to receive some well-merited rebuke. He said that he wished my sister and me to stay at home more. I saw the two faces very clearly. My father's I had not seen for fifty-nine years. April 6. Went in the afternoon with Mrs. Stillman to the Campo dei Fiori, where bought two pieces of lace for twenty lire each, and a little cap-pin for five lire. Saw a small
April 18th (search for this): chapter 27
ace. ... A good talk with Hamilton Aide, who told me of the Spartali family. In the afternoon to Lady Kenmare's reception and later to dine with the Lindall Winthrops. April 11. In the afternoon Harriet Monroe, of Chicago, came and read her play — a parlor drama, ingenious and well written. The audience were much pleased with it. April 13.... In the evening dined with Theodore Davis and Mrs. Andrews. Davis showed us his treasures gathered on the Nile shore and gave me a scarab. April 18. .. Went to hear Canon Farrar on the Inferno of Dante — the lecture very scholarly and good. April 22. With Anderson to the Vatican, to see the Pinturicchio frescoes, which are very interesting. He designed the tiling for the floors, which is beautiful in color, matching well with the frescoes — these represent scenes in the life of the Virgin and of St. Catherine.... April 24. To Miss Leigh Smith's, where I read my sermon on the Still Small Voice to a small company of friends, expla<
April 22nd (search for this): chapter 27
nmare's reception and later to dine with the Lindall Winthrops. April 11. In the afternoon Harriet Monroe, of Chicago, came and read her play — a parlor drama, ingenious and well written. The audience were much pleased with it. April 13.... In the evening dined with Theodore Davis and Mrs. Andrews. Davis showed us his treasures gathered on the Nile shore and gave me a scarab. April 18. .. Went to hear Canon Farrar on the Inferno of Dante — the lecture very scholarly and good. April 22. With Anderson to the Vatican, to see the Pinturicchio frescoes, which are very interesting. He designed the tiling for the floors, which is beautiful in color, matching well with the frescoes — these represent scenes in the life of the Virgin and of St. Catherine.... April 24. To Miss Leigh Smith's, where I read my sermon on the Still Small Voice to a small company of friends, explaining that it was written in the first instance for the Concord Prison, and that I read it there to the c<
April 26th (search for this): chapter 27
ssador]. He was brought up at Hopedale in the Community, of which his father was a member, his mother not altogether acquiescing. He went into our Civil War when only twenty years of age, having the day before married a wife. He was badly wounded in the battle of the Wilderness. Mosby [guerilla] met the wounded train, and stripped them of money and watches, taking also the horses of their conveyances. A young Irish lad of fourteen saved Draper's life by running to Bull Plain for aid. April 26. Lunch at Daisy Chanler's, to meet Mrs. Sanford, of Hamilton, Canada, who is here in the interests of the International Council of Women. She seems a nice, whole-souled woman.... I have promised to preside at a meeting, called at Daisy's rooms for Thursday, to carry forward such measures as we can and to introduce Mrs. Sanford and interpret for her. April 27. Devoted the forenoon to a composition in French, setting forth the objects of the meeting.... April 28. Went carefully over my
April 25th (search for this): chapter 27
air with the call to prayer, a group of exiles from many lands gathered in the pleasant English-looking drawingroom. From the windows they could look down upon the flower-decked Piazza di Spagna, hear the song of the nightingales in the Villa Medici, breathe the perfume of violets and almond blossoms from the Pincio. This morning, or another, Paul Sabatier was among the listeners, a grave, gracious man, a Savoyard pastor, whose Life of Saint Francis of Assisi had set all Rome talking. April 25. To lunch with the Drapers. Had some good talk with Mr. D. [the American Ambassador]. He was brought up at Hopedale in the Community, of which his father was a member, his mother not altogether acquiescing. He went into our Civil War when only twenty years of age, having the day before married a wife. He was badly wounded in the battle of the Wilderness. Mosby [guerilla] met the wounded train, and stripped them of money and watches, taking also the horses of their conveyances. A young
April 24th (search for this): chapter 27
Davis and Mrs. Andrews. Davis showed us his treasures gathered on the Nile shore and gave me a scarab. April 18. .. Went to hear Canon Farrar on the Inferno of Dante — the lecture very scholarly and good. April 22. With Anderson to the Vatican, to see the Pinturicchio frescoes, which are very interesting. He designed the tiling for the floors, which is beautiful in color, matching well with the frescoes — these represent scenes in the life of the Virgin and of St. Catherine.... April 24. To Miss Leigh Smith's, where I read my sermon on the Still Small Voice to a small company of friends, explaining that it was written in the first instance for the Concord Prison, and that I read it there to the convicts. I prefaced the sermon by reading one of the parables in my Later Lyrics, Once, where men of high pretension, etc.... This was one of several occasions when she read a sermon at the house of Miss Leigh Smith, a stanch Unitarian, who lived at the Trinita dea Monti in the
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