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December 6th (search for this): chapter 27
e more enthralled her, but it was not until she had founded a club, helped to found a Woman's Council, begun to receive invitations to lecture and to preach, that the accustomed joie de vivre pulses through the record. The sower is at work again, the ground is fertile, the seed quickening. December 1. The first day of this winter, which God help me to live through! Dearest Maud is all kindness and devotion to me, and so is Jack, but I have Rome en grippe; nothing in it pleases me. December 6. Something, perhaps it is the bright weather, moves me to activity so strongly that I hasten to take up my pen, hoping not to lapse into the mood of passive depression which has possessed me ever since my arrival in Rome. December 7. We visited the [William J.] Stillmans -S. and I had not met in thirty years, not since '67 in Athens. Went to afternoon tea at Miss Leigh Smith's. She is a cousin of Florence Nightingale, whom she resembles in appearance. Mme. Helbig was there, overflowin
December 10th (search for this): chapter 27
frequented the antiquaries, gleaning small treasures of ancient lace and peasant jewels. I bought this by the Muse Stillman's advice : this explanation guaranteed the wisdom of purchasing the small rose diamond ring set in black enamel. December 9. Dined with Daisy Chanler. We met there one Brewster and Hendrik Anderson. After dinner came Palmer [son of Courtland] and his sister. He is a pianist of real power and charm — made me think of Paderewski, when I first heard him .... December 10. Drove past the Trevi Fountain and to the Coliseum, where we walked awhile. Ladies came to hear me talk about Women's Clubs. This talk, which I had rather dreaded to give, passed off pleasantly.... Most of the ladies present expressed the desire to have a small and select club of women in Rome. Maud volunteered to make the first effort, with Mme. DesGrange and Jessie Cochrane to help her. December 12. Bessie Crawford brought her children to see me. Very fine little creatures, the el
December 9th (search for this): chapter 27
ting-place for artists and litterati. Mrs. Stillman our mother had formerly known as the beautiful Marie Spartali, the friend of Rossetti and Du Maurier, the idol of literary and artistic London. A warm friendship grew up between them. Together they frequented the antiquaries, gleaning small treasures of ancient lace and peasant jewels. I bought this by the Muse Stillman's advice : this explanation guaranteed the wisdom of purchasing the small rose diamond ring set in black enamel. December 9. Dined with Daisy Chanler. We met there one Brewster and Hendrik Anderson. After dinner came Palmer [son of Courtland] and his sister. He is a pianist of real power and charm — made me think of Paderewski, when I first heard him .... December 10. Drove past the Trevi Fountain and to the Coliseum, where we walked awhile. Ladies came to hear me talk about Women's Clubs. This talk, which I had rather dreaded to give, passed off pleasantly.... Most of the ladies present expressed the d
December 7th (search for this): chapter 27
work again, the ground is fertile, the seed quickening. December 1. The first day of this winter, which God help me to live through! Dearest Maud is all kindness and devotion to me, and so is Jack, but I have Rome en grippe; nothing in it pleases me. December 6. Something, perhaps it is the bright weather, moves me to activity so strongly that I hasten to take up my pen, hoping not to lapse into the mood of passive depression which has possessed me ever since my arrival in Rome. December 7. We visited the [William J.] Stillmans -S. and I had not met in thirty years, not since '67 in Athens. Went to afternoon tea at Miss Leigh Smith's. She is a cousin of Florence Nightingale, whom she resembles in appearance. Mme. Helbig was there, overflowing as ever with geniality and kindness. Mr. Stillman was then the Roman correspondent of the London Times, a position only second in importance to that of the British Ambassador. His tall, lean figure, stooping shoulders,--where a pe
December 14th (search for this): chapter 27
.... Most of the ladies present expressed the desire to have a small and select club of women in Rome. Maud volunteered to make the first effort, with Mme. DesGrange and Jessie Cochrane to help her. December 12. Bessie Crawford brought her children to see me. Very fine little creatures, the eldest boy Harold Crawford, who was killed in the present war (1915), fighting for the Allies. handsome, dark like his mother, the others blond and a good deal like Marion in his early life. December 14. In the afternoon drove with Jack to visit Villegas. Found a splendid house with absolutely no fire — the cold of the studio was tomb-like. A fire was lighted in a stove and cakes were served, with some excellent Amontillado wine, which I think saved my life. December 18. When I lay down to take my nap before dinner, I had a sudden thought-vision of the glory of God in the face of Jesus Christ. I seemed to see how the human could in a way reflect the glory of the divine, giving not
December 12th (search for this): chapter 27
real power and charm — made me think of Paderewski, when I first heard him .... December 10. Drove past the Trevi Fountain and to the Coliseum, where we walked awhile. Ladies came to hear me talk about Women's Clubs. This talk, which I had rather dreaded to give, passed off pleasantly.... Most of the ladies present expressed the desire to have a small and select club of women in Rome. Maud volunteered to make the first effort, with Mme. DesGrange and Jessie Cochrane to help her. December 12. Bessie Crawford brought her children to see me. Very fine little creatures, the eldest boy Harold Crawford, who was killed in the present war (1915), fighting for the Allies. handsome, dark like his mother, the others blond and a good deal like Marion in his early life. December 14. In the afternoon drove with Jack to visit Villegas. Found a splendid house with absolutely no fire — the cold of the studio was tomb-like. A fire was lighted in a stove and cakes were served, with so
little knot of newly elected officers of the Council of Italian Women that is to be. Read them my report of our first meeting — they chattered a great deal. Mrs. Sanford was present. She seemed grateful for the help I had tried to give to her plan of a National Council of Italian Women. I induced the ladies present to subscribe a few lire each, for the purchase of a book for the secretary, for postage and for the printing of their small circular. Hope to help them more further on.... May 1.... I gave my Rest sermon at Miss Leigh Smith's.... Afterwards to lunch with the dear Stillman Muse. Lady Airlie and the Thynne sisters were there. Had a pleasant talk with Lady Beatrice. ... . Wrote a letter to be read at the Suffrage Festival in Boston on May 17.... Lady Beatrice and Lady Katherine Thynne; the latter was married later to Lord Cromer, Viceroy of Egypt. The Ladies Thynne were passing the winter with their cousin, the Countess of Kenmare, at her pleasant apartment in th
December 18th (search for this): chapter 27
tle creatures, the eldest boy Harold Crawford, who was killed in the present war (1915), fighting for the Allies. handsome, dark like his mother, the others blond and a good deal like Marion in his early life. December 14. In the afternoon drove with Jack to visit Villegas. Found a splendid house with absolutely no fire — the cold of the studio was tomb-like. A fire was lighted in a stove and cakes were served, with some excellent Amontillado wine, which I think saved my life. December 18. When I lay down to take my nap before dinner, I had a sudden thought-vision of the glory of God in the face of Jesus Christ. I seemed to see how the human could in a way reflect the glory of the divine, giving not a mechanical, but an affectional and spiritual re-showing of the great unfathomable glory. I need not say that I had no sleep — I wish the glimpse then given me might remain in my mind. December 21. Feeling much better in health, I determined to take up my Reminiscences a
age Festival in Boston on May 17.... Lady Beatrice and Lady Katherine Thynne; the latter was married later to Lord Cromer, Viceroy of Egypt. The Ladies Thynne were passing the winter with their cousin, the Countess of Kenmare, at her pleasant apartment in the Via Gregoriana. Among the guests one met at Lady Kenmare's was a dark, handsome Monsignore who spoke English like an Oxford Don, and looked like a Torquemada. Later he became Papal Secretary of State and Cardinal Merry del Val. May 2. Have worked as usual. A pleasant late drive. Dined with Eleutherio, Her brother-in-law, Luther Terry. Daisy Chanler, and Dr. Bull; whist afterwards; news of an engagement and victory for us off Manila. May 4.... We dined with Marchese and Marchesa de Viti de Marco at Palazzo Orsini. Their rooms are very fine, one hung with beautiful crimson damask. An author, Pascarello, was present, who has written comic poems in the Romanesque dialect, the principal one a mock narrative of the d
s of Kenmare, at her pleasant apartment in the Via Gregoriana. Among the guests one met at Lady Kenmare's was a dark, handsome Monsignore who spoke English like an Oxford Don, and looked like a Torquemada. Later he became Papal Secretary of State and Cardinal Merry del Val. May 2. Have worked as usual. A pleasant late drive. Dined with Eleutherio, Her brother-in-law, Luther Terry. Daisy Chanler, and Dr. Bull; whist afterwards; news of an engagement and victory for us off Manila. May 4.... We dined with Marchese and Marchesa de Viti de Marco at Palazzo Orsini. Their rooms are very fine, one hung with beautiful crimson damask. An author, Pascarello, was present, who has written comic poems in the Romanesque dialect, the principal one a mock narrative of the discovery of America by Columbus. Our host is a very intelligent man, much occupied with questions of political economy, of which science he is professor at the Collegio Romano. His wife, an American, is altogether p
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