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very fine, one hung with beautiful crimson damask. An author, Pascarello, was present, who has written comic poems in the Romanesque dialect, the principal one a mock narrative of the discovery of America by Columbus. Our host is a very intelligent man, much occupied with questions of political economy, of which science he is professor at the Collegio Romano. His wife, an American, is altogether pleasing. He spoke of the present Spanish War, of which foreigners understand but little. May 5. A visit from Contessa di Taverna to confer with me about the new departure [the International Council of Women]. She says that the ladies will not promise to pay the stipulated contribution, five hundred lire once in five years, to the parent association. .. May 8. An exquisite hour with dear Maud on the terrace — the roses in their glory, red, white, and yellow; honeysuckle out, brilliant. We sat in a sheltered spot, talked of things present and to come. Robert Collyer to lunch. I as
antiquities, -has published a paper on the Celtic origin of the Divina Commedia, and has written one on the discovery of America by Irish Danes, five hundred years before Columbus. Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Heywood lived a few doors from the Rusticucci in the Palazzo Giraud Torlonia, one of the finest Roman palaces. Mr. Heywood held an office in the Papal Court, and had a papal title which he was wise enough not to use in general society. He was an American, a Harvard graduate of the class of 1855. His chief occupation, outside of his duties at the Vatican, was the collection of a fine library. His house was a rendezvous of Black I. e., Clerical. society. He lived in much state and entertained with brilliant formality. Among the great social events of that winter was his reception given for Cardinal Satolli, who arrived dressed in splendid vestments, escorted by his suite. The hostess courtesied to the ground and kissed the ring on his finger. All the other Catholic ladies foll
December 21st (search for this): chapter 27
ved, with some excellent Amontillado wine, which I think saved my life. December 18. When I lay down to take my nap before dinner, I had a sudden thought-vision of the glory of God in the face of Jesus Christ. I seemed to see how the human could in a way reflect the glory of the divine, giving not a mechanical, but an affectional and spiritual re-showing of the great unfathomable glory. I need not say that I had no sleep — I wish the glimpse then given me might remain in my mind. December 21. Feeling much better in health, I determined to take up my Reminiscences again. Mme. Rose passed the evening with me. She told me that Pio Nono had endorsed the Rosminian philosophy, which had had quite a following in the Church, Cardinal Hohenlohe having been very prominent in this. When Leo XIII was elected, the Jesuits came to him and promised that he should have a Jubilee if he would take part against the Rosminian ideas, and put the books on the Index Expurgatorius, the which he pr
d with questions of political economy, of which science he is professor at the Collegio Romano. His wife, an American, is altogether pleasing. He spoke of the present Spanish War, of which foreigners understand but little. May 5. A visit from Contessa di Taverna to confer with me about the new departure [the International Council of Women]. She says that the ladies will not promise to pay the stipulated contribution, five hundred lire once in five years, to the parent association. .. May 8. An exquisite hour with dear Maud on the terrace — the roses in their glory, red, white, and yellow; honeysuckle out, brilliant. We sat in a sheltered spot, talked of things present and to come. Robert Collyer to lunch. I asked him to say grace, which he did in his lovely manner. He enjoyed Maud's terrace with views of St. Peter's and the mountains. In the afternoon took a little drive. Several visitors called, among them Louisa Broadwood, from whom I learned that the little Committe
manner. He enjoyed Maud's terrace with views of St. Peter's and the mountains. In the afternoon took a little drive. Several visitors called, among them Louisa Broadwood, from whom I learned that the little Committee for a Woman's Council is going on. The ladies have decided not to join the International at present, but to try and form an Italian Council first. Some good results are already beginning to appear in the cooperation of two separate charities in some part of their work. May 9. I must now give all diligence to my preparation for departure. Cannot write more on Reminiscences until I reach home. Maud made a dead set against my going to Countess Resse's where a number of ladies had been invited to meet me. I most unwillingly gave up this one opportunity of helping the Woman's Cause; I mean this one remaining occasion, as I have already spoken twice to women and have given two sermons and read lectures five times. It is true that there might have been some exposure
January 21st (search for this): chapter 27
tatue of St. Peter. January 19. Have composed a letter to Professor Lanciani, asking for a talk on the afternoon of February 9, proposing Houses and Housekeeping in Ancient Rome, and The Sibyls of Italy. Mr. Baddeley came in, and we had an interesting talk, mostly about the ancient Caesars, Mrs. Hollins asking, Why did the Romans put up with the bad Caesars? He thought the increase of wealth under Augustus was the beginning of a great deterioration of the people and the officials. January 21. Went in the afternoon to call upon Baroness Giacchetti. Had a pleasant talk with her husband, an enlightened man. He recognizes the present status of Rome as greatly superior to the ancient order of things — but laments the ignorance and superstition of the common people in general, and the peasantry in particular. A sick woman, restored to health by much trouble taken at his instance, instead of thanking him for his benefactions, told him that she intended to make a pilgrimage to the s
January 19th (search for this): chapter 27
agged, but parts beautifully sung. Was impressed as usual by the heterogeneous attendance — tourists with campstools and without, ecclesiastics of various grades, students, friars; one splendid working-man in his corduroys stood like a statue, in an attitude of fixed attention. Lowly fathers and mothers carrying small children. One lady, seated high at the base of a column, put her feet on the seat of my stool behind me. Saw the gorgeous ring on the finger of the statue of St. Peter. January 19. Have composed a letter to Professor Lanciani, asking for a talk on the afternoon of February 9, proposing Houses and Housekeeping in Ancient Rome, and The Sibyls of Italy. Mr. Baddeley came in, and we had an interesting talk, mostly about the ancient Caesars, Mrs. Hollins asking, Why did the Romans put up with the bad Caesars? He thought the increase of wealth under Augustus was the beginning of a great deterioration of the people and the officials. January 21. Went in the afternoon
January 18th (search for this): chapter 27
al Satolli, who arrived dressed in splendid vestments, escorted by his suite. The hostess courtesied to the ground and kissed the ring on his finger. All the other Catholic ladies followed suit. Sitting very straight in her chair, our mother bided her time; finally the Cardinal was brought to her. He was a genial, courteous man and very soon they were deep in friendly talk. Though she disliked the Roman hierarchy as an institution, she counted many friends among the priests of Rome. January 18. To St. Peter's. The Festival of St. Peter's Chair. Vespers in the usual side chapel. Music on the whole good, some sopranos rather ragged, but parts beautifully sung. Was impressed as usual by the heterogeneous attendance — tourists with campstools and without, ecclesiastics of various grades, students, friars; one splendid working-man in his corduroys stood like a statue, in an attitude of fixed attention. Lowly fathers and mothers carrying small children. One lady, seated high at t
sachusetts. Her husband has been an officer of the King's bersaglieri. Before the unification of Italy, he was sent to Perugia to reclaim deserters from among the recruits for the Italian army. Cardinal Pecci was then living near Perugia. Count Catucci called to assure him with great politeness that he would take his word and not search his premises. The Cardinal treated him with equal politeness, but declined to continue the acquaintance after his removal to Rome, when he became Pope in 1878. January 12. The first meeting of our little circleat Miss Leigh Smith's, 17 Trinita dei Monti. I presided and introduced Richard Norton, who gave an interesting account of the American School of Archaeology at Athens, and of the excavations at Athens.... Anderson to dine. He took a paper outline of my profile, wishing to model a bust of me. The Winthrop Chanlers were passing the winter in Rome; this added much to her pleasure. The depression gradually disappeared, and she found hers
December 31st (search for this): chapter 27
ains. She delighted in the flowers of the terrace, which she called her hanging garden ; she had her own little watering-pot, and faithfully tended the white rose which she claimed as her special charge. From the terrace she looked across to the windows of the Pope's private apartment. Opposed as she was to the Pontiff's policy, she still felt a sympathy with the old man, whose splendid prison she often passed on her way to St. Peter's, where in bad weather she always took her walk. December 31. I am sorry to take leave of this year, which has given me many good things, some blessings in disguise, as my lameness proved, compelling me to pass many quiet days, good for study and for my Reminiscences, which I only began in earnest after Wesselhoeft condemned me to remain on one floor for a month. January 3, 1898. I feel that my Reminiscences will be disappointing to the world in general, if it ever troubles itself to read them,--I feel quite sure that it has neglected some good
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