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February 26th (search for this): chapter 27
manner of man is the first? Doctissimus. Doceat, says St. Thomas. And the second? Sanctissimus. Oret! and the third? Prudentissimus! Regat! Let him rule! says the Saint. February 20. To Methodist Church of Rev. Mr. Burt. A sensible short discourse — seems a very sincere man: has an earlier service for Italians, well attended. On my way home, stopped at Gargiulo's and bought a ragged but very good copy of the Divina Commedia, unbound, with Dore's illustrations. February 26. To tea at Mrs. Hazeltine's where met William Allen Butler, author of Nothing to weara bright-eyed, conversable man. Have a sitting to Anderson. When I returned from Mrs. Hazeltine's I found Hall Caine.... He told much about Gabriel Rossetti, with whom he had much to do. Rossetti was a victim of chloral, and Caine was set to keep him from it, except in discreet doses. March 4. Went to see the King and Queen, returning from the review of troops. They were coldly received. She wore cr
January 15th (search for this): chapter 27
American sculptor, modelled an interesting terra-cotta bust. While the sittings for these portraits were going on, her niece said to her:-- My aunt, I can expect almost anything of you, but I had hardly expected a success de beauty. Among the diplomats who play so prominent a part in Roman society, the Jonkheer John Loudon, Secretary of the Netherlands Legation, was one of her favorite visitors; there are frequent mentions of his singing, which she took pleasure in accompanying. January 15. We had a pleasant drive to Villa Madama where we bought fresh eggs from a peasant. Cola cut much greenery for us with which Maud had our rooms decorated. Attended Mrs. Heywood's reception, where met some pleasant people — the Scudder party; an English Catholic named Christmas, who visits the poor, and reports the misery among them as very great; a young priest from Boston, Monsignor O'Connell Now Cardinal O'Connell.; a Mr. and Mrs. Mulhorn, Irish,--he strong on statistics, she a writ
January 26th (search for this): chapter 27
husband, an enlightened man. He recognizes the present status of Rome as greatly superior to the ancient order of things — but laments the ignorance and superstition of the common people in general, and the peasantry in particular. A sick woman, restored to health by much trouble taken at his instance, instead of thanking him for his benefactions, told him that she intended to make a pilgrimage to the shrine of a certain Madonna, feeling sure that it was to her that she owed her cure. January 26. The day of my reading before the Club, at Jessie Cochrane's rooms. I read my lecture over very carefully in the forenoon and got into the spirit of it. The gathering was a large one, very attentive, and mostly very appreciative. The paper was Woman in the Greek drama. January 31. Have made a special prayer that my mind may be less occupied with my own shortcomings, and more with all that keeps our best hope alive. Felt little able to write, but produced a good page on the principle
December 25th (search for this): chapter 27
books on the Index Expurgatorius, the which he promptly did. Hohenlohe is supposed to have been the real hero of the poisoning described in Zola's Rome --his servant died after having eaten of something which had been sent from the Vatican. December 25. Blessed Christmas Day! Maud and I went to St. Peter's to get, as she said, a whiff of the mass. We did not profit much by this, but met Edward Jackson, of Boston, and Monsignor Stanley, whom I had not seen in many years. We had a pleasant Christmas Day! Maud and I went to St. Peter's to get, as she said, a whiff of the mass. We did not profit much by this, but met Edward Jackson, of Boston, and Monsignor Stanley, whom I had not seen in many years. We had a pleasant foregathering with him. In St. Peter's my mind became impressed with the immense intellectual force pledged to the upbuilding and upholding of the Church of Rome. As this thought almost overpowered me, I remembered our dear Christ visiting the superb temple at Jerusalem and foretelling its destruction and the indestructibility of his own doctrine. On fair days she took her walk on the terrace, feasting her eyes on the splendid view. In the distance the Alban and the Sabine Hills, Mount
Chapter 10: the last Roman winter 1897-1898; aet. 78 The city of my love She sits among th' eternal hills, Their crown, thrice glorious and dear; Her voice is as a thousand tongues Of silver fountains, gurgling clear. Her breath is prayer, her life is love, And worship of all lovely things; Her children have a gracious port, Her beggars show the blood of kings. By old Tradition guarded close, None doubt the grandeur she has seen; Upon her venerable front Is written: “I was born a Quee, expresses the longing that, like Shelley's, her heart might buried lie in Rome. Some memory of this wish, some foreboding that the wish might be granted, possibly darkened the first days of her last Roman winter. In late November of the year 1897 she arrived in Rome with the Elliotts to pass the winter at their apartment in the ancient Palazzo Rusticucci of the old Leonine City across the Tiber; in the shadow of St. Peter's, next door to the Vatican. The visit had been planned partly in t
February 16th (search for this): chapter 27
lls me of a friend, Zahm by name, now gone to a place in Indiana, who has biographies of the historical women of Bologna. February 9. Club at Mrs. Broadwood's. I read my Plea for Humor, which seemed to please the audience very much, especially Princess Talleyrand and Princess Poggia-Suasa. February 11. Read over my paper on Optimism and Pessimism and have got into the spirit of it. Maud's friends came at 3 P. M., among them Christian Ross, the painter, with Bjornstjerne Bjornson. February 16. To Mrs. Hurlburt's reception.--Talked with Countess Blank, an American married to a Pole. She had much to say of the piety of her Arab servant, who, she says, swallows fire, cuts himself with sharp things, etc., as acts of devotion!! Met Mr. Trench, son of the late Archbishop, Rev. Chevenix Trench. He has been Tennyson's publisher. Did not like T. personally — said he was often rude — read his own poems aloud constantly and very badly; said, No man is a hero to his publisher. Told ab
Chapter 10: the last Roman winter 1897-1898; aet. 78 The city of my love She sits among th' eternal hills, Their crown, thrice glorious and dear; Her voice is as a thousand tongues Of silver fountains, gurgling clear. Her breath is prayer, her life is love, And worship of all lovely things; Her children have a gracious port, Her beggars show the blood of kings. By old Tradition guarded close, None doubt the grandeur she has seen; Upon her venerable front Is written: “I was born a Queen!” She rules the age by Beauty's power, As once she ruled by armed might; The Southern sun doth treasure her Deep in his golden heart of light. Awe strikes the traveller when he sees The'vision of her distant dome, And a strange spasm wrings his heart As the guide whispers: “There is Rome!” And, though it seem a childish prayer, I've breathed it oft, that when I die, As thy remembrance dear in it, That heart in thee might buried lie. J. W. H. The closing verse of her early poem, The C
February 11th (search for this): chapter 27
L. Terry; then to afternoon tea with Mrs. Thorndike, where I met the first Monsignor [Dennis] O'Connell, with whom I had a long talk on the woman question, in which he seems much interested. He tells me of a friend, Zahm by name, now gone to a place in Indiana, who has biographies of the historical women of Bologna. February 9. Club at Mrs. Broadwood's. I read my Plea for Humor, which seemed to please the audience very much, especially Princess Talleyrand and Princess Poggia-Suasa. February 11. Read over my paper on Optimism and Pessimism and have got into the spirit of it. Maud's friends came at 3 P. M., among them Christian Ross, the painter, with Bjornstjerne Bjornson. February 16. To Mrs. Hurlburt's reception.--Talked with Countess Blank, an American married to a Pole. She had much to say of the piety of her Arab servant, who, she says, swallows fire, cuts himself with sharp things, etc., as acts of devotion!! Met Mr. Trench, son of the late Archbishop, Rev. Chevenix Tr
February 9th (search for this): chapter 27
ed high at the base of a column, put her feet on the seat of my stool behind me. Saw the gorgeous ring on the finger of the statue of St. Peter. January 19. Have composed a letter to Professor Lanciani, asking for a talk on the afternoon of February 9, proposing Houses and Housekeeping in Ancient Rome, and The Sibyls of Italy. Mr. Baddeley came in, and we had an interesting talk, mostly about the ancient Caesars, Mrs. Hollins asking, Why did the Romans put up with the bad Caesars? He thougnsignor [Dennis] O'Connell, with whom I had a long talk on the woman question, in which he seems much interested. He tells me of a friend, Zahm by name, now gone to a place in Indiana, who has biographies of the historical women of Bologna. February 9. Club at Mrs. Broadwood's. I read my Plea for Humor, which seemed to please the audience very much, especially Princess Talleyrand and Princess Poggia-Suasa. February 11. Read over my paper on Optimism and Pessimism and have got into the spi
January 31st (search for this): chapter 27
en at his instance, instead of thanking him for his benefactions, told him that she intended to make a pilgrimage to the shrine of a certain Madonna, feeling sure that it was to her that she owed her cure. January 26. The day of my reading before the Club, at Jessie Cochrane's rooms. I read my lecture over very carefully in the forenoon and got into the spirit of it. The gathering was a large one, very attentive, and mostly very appreciative. The paper was Woman in the Greek drama. January 31. Have made a special prayer that my mind may be less occupied with my own shortcomings, and more with all that keeps our best hope alive. Felt little able to write, but produced a good page on the principle nulla dies sine linea. February 4. Hard sledding for words todaymade out something about Theodore Parker. February 7. Wrote some pages of introduction for the Symposium — played a rubber of whist with L. Terry; then to afternoon tea with Mrs. Thorndike, where I met the first Mon
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