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ion. Lowly fathers and mothers carrying small children. One lady, seated high at the base of a column, put her feet on the seat of my stool behind me. Saw the gorgeous ring on the finger of the statue of St. Peter. January 19. Have composed a letter to Professor Lanciani, asking for a talk on the afternoon of February 9, proposing Houses and Housekeeping in Ancient Rome, and The Sibyls of Italy. Mr. Baddeley came in, and we had an interesting talk, mostly about the ancient Caesars, Mrs. Hollins asking, Why did the Romans put up with the bad Caesars? He thought the increase of wealth under Augustus was the beginning of a great deterioration of the people and the officials. January 21. Went in the afternoon to call upon Baroness Giacchetti. Had a pleasant talk with her husband, an enlightened man. He recognizes the present status of Rome as greatly superior to the ancient order of things — but laments the ignorance and superstition of the common people in general, and the pea
Villa Julia (search for this): chapter 27
ber hearing from her. I presently quoted her toast in La Locandiera, of which she repeated the last two lines. Maud had arranged to have Mrs. Hurlburt help me home. Contessa Spinola also offered, but I got off alone, came home in time to hear most of Professor Pansotti's lecture on the Gregorian music, which, though technical, was interesting. March 31. I woke up at one, after vividly dreaming of my father and Dr. Francis. My father came in, and said to me that he wished to speak to Miss Julia alone. I trembled, as I so often did, lest I was about to receive some well-merited rebuke. He said that he wished my sister and me to stay at home more. I saw the two faces very clearly. My father's I had not seen for fifty-nine years. April 6. Went in the afternoon with Mrs. Stillman to the Campo dei Fiori, where bought two pieces of lace for twenty lire each, and a little cap-pin for five lire. Saw a small ruby and diamond ring which I very much fancied. April 10. Easter Sunda
sand copies sold in England. February 18. Have done a good morning's work and read in the Nineteenth Century an article on Nelson, and one on the new astronomy. St. Thomas Aquinas's advice regarding the election of an abbot from three candidates:-- What manner of man is the first? Doctissimus. Doceat, says St. Thomas. And the second? Sanctissimus. Oret! and the third? Prudentissimus! Regat! Let him rule! says the Saint. February 20. To Methodist Church of Rev. Mr. Burt. A sensible short discourse — seems a very sincere man: has an earlier service for Italians, well attended. On my way home, stopped at Gargiulo's and bought a ragged but very good copy of the Divina Commedia, unbound, with Dore's illustrations. February 26. To tea at Mrs. Hazeltine's where met William Allen Butler, author of Nothing to weara bright-eyed, conversable man. Have a sitting to Anderson. When I returned from Mrs. Hazeltine's I found Hall Caine.... He told much about Gabr
Cardinal O'Connell (search for this): chapter 27
— the Scudder party; an English Catholic named Christmas, who visits the poor, and reports the misery among them as very great; a young priest from Boston, Monsignor O'Connell Now Cardinal O'Connell.; a Mr. and Mrs. Mulhorn, Irish,--he strong on statistics, she a writer on Celtic antiquities, -has published a paper on the CeltiCardinal O'Connell.; a Mr. and Mrs. Mulhorn, Irish,--he strong on statistics, she a writer on Celtic antiquities, -has published a paper on the Celtic origin of the Divina Commedia, and has written one on the discovery of America by Irish Danes, five hundred years before Columbus. Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Heywood lived a few doors from the Rusticucci in the Palazzo Giraud Torlonia, one of the finest Roman palaces. Mr. Heywood held an office in the Papal Court, and had a papal tis of introduction for the Symposium — played a rubber of whist with L. Terry; then to afternoon tea with Mrs. Thorndike, where I met the first Monsignor [Dennis] O'Connell, with whom I had a long talk on the woman question, in which he seems much interested. He tells me of a friend, Zahm by name, now gone to a place in Indiana, wh
John Mosby (search for this): chapter 27
ng the listeners, a grave, gracious man, a Savoyard pastor, whose Life of Saint Francis of Assisi had set all Rome talking. April 25. To lunch with the Drapers. Had some good talk with Mr. D. [the American Ambassador]. He was brought up at Hopedale in the Community, of which his father was a member, his mother not altogether acquiescing. He went into our Civil War when only twenty years of age, having the day before married a wife. He was badly wounded in the battle of the Wilderness. Mosby [guerilla] met the wounded train, and stripped them of money and watches, taking also the horses of their conveyances. A young Irish lad of fourteen saved Draper's life by running to Bull Plain for aid. April 26. Lunch at Daisy Chanler's, to meet Mrs. Sanford, of Hamilton, Canada, who is here in the interests of the International Council of Women. She seems a nice, whole-souled woman.... I have promised to preside at a meeting, called at Daisy's rooms for Thursday, to carry forward such
Bjornstjerne Bjornson (search for this): chapter 27
t of me. The Winthrop Chanlers were passing the winter in Rome; this added much to her pleasure. The depression gradually disappeared, and she found herself once more at home there. She met many people who interested her: Hall Caine, Bjornstjerne Bjornson, many artists too. Don Jose Villegas, the great Spanish painter (now Director of the Prado Museum at Madrid), who was living in his famous Moorish villa on the Monte Parioli, made a brilliant, realistic portrait of her, and Hendrik Ander much, especially Princess Talleyrand and Princess Poggia-Suasa. February 11. Read over my paper on Optimism and Pessimism and have got into the spirit of it. Maud's friends came at 3 P. M., among them Christian Ross, the painter, with Bjornstjerne Bjornson. February 16. To Mrs. Hurlburt's reception.--Talked with Countess Blank, an American married to a Pole. She had much to say of the piety of her Arab servant, who, she says, swallows fire, cuts himself with sharp things, etc., as acts
William Wesselhoeft (search for this): chapter 27
of the Pope's private apartment. Opposed as she was to the Pontiff's policy, she still felt a sympathy with the old man, whose splendid prison she often passed on her way to St. Peter's, where in bad weather she always took her walk. December 31. I am sorry to take leave of this year, which has given me many good things, some blessings in disguise, as my lameness proved, compelling me to pass many quiet days, good for study and for my Reminiscences, which I only began in earnest after Wesselhoeft condemned me to remain on one floor for a month. January 3, 1898. I feel that my Reminiscences will be disappointing to the world in general, if it ever troubles itself to read them,--I feel quite sure that it has neglected some good writing of mine, in verse and in prose. I cannot help anticipating for this book the same neglect, and this discourages me somewhat. In the afternoon drove to Monte Janiculo and saw the wonderful view of Rome, and the equestrian statue of Garibaldi cro
Mary Stearns (search for this): chapter 27
itself to read them,--I feel quite sure that it has neglected some good writing of mine, in verse and in prose. I cannot help anticipating for this book the same neglect, and this discourages me somewhat. In the afternoon drove to Monte Janiculo and saw the wonderful view of Rome, and the equestrian statue of Garibaldi crowning the height. We also drove through the Villa Pamfili Doria, which is very beautiful. January 6. To visit Countess Catucci at Villino Catucci. She was a Miss Mary Stearns, of Springfield, Massachusetts. Her husband has been an officer of the King's bersaglieri. Before the unification of Italy, he was sent to Perugia to reclaim deserters from among the recruits for the Italian army. Cardinal Pecci was then living near Perugia. Count Catucci called to assure him with great politeness that he would take his word and not search his premises. The Cardinal treated him with equal politeness, but declined to continue the acquaintance after his removal to
Compensation to-day for the first time, having written my essay on Moral Triangulation of the Third Party some thirty years ago. March 26. Dined with Mrs. McCreary--the Duke of San Martino took me in to dinner-Monsignor Dennis O'Connell sat on the other side of me. I had an interesting talk with him. Mrs. McCreary sang my Battle Hymn. They begged me to recite The Flag, which I did. Mrs. Pearse, daughter of Mario and Grisi, sang delightfully. March 30. A fine luncheon party given by Mrs. Iddings, wife of the American Secretary of Embassy at the Grand Hotel. Mme. Ristori was there; I had some glimpses of reminiscence with her. I met her with La terribila Medea, which I so well remember hearing from her. I presently quoted her toast in La Locandiera, of which she repeated the last two lines. Maud had arranged to have Mrs. Hurlburt help me home. Contessa Spinola also offered, but I got off alone, came home in time to hear most of Professor Pansotti's lecture on the Gregorian musi
Theodore Davis (search for this): chapter 27
dine with the Lindall Winthrops. April 11. In the afternoon Harriet Monroe, of Chicago, came and read her play — a parlor drama, ingenious and well written. The audience were much pleased with it. April 13.... In the evening dined with Theodore Davis and Mrs. Andrews. Davis showed us his treasures gathered on the Nile shore and gave me a scarab. April 18. .. Went to hear Canon Farrar on the Inferno of Dante — the lecture very scholarly and good. April 22. With Anderson to the VatiDavis showed us his treasures gathered on the Nile shore and gave me a scarab. April 18. .. Went to hear Canon Farrar on the Inferno of Dante — the lecture very scholarly and good. April 22. With Anderson to the Vatican, to see the Pinturicchio frescoes, which are very interesting. He designed the tiling for the floors, which is beautiful in color, matching well with the frescoes — these represent scenes in the life of the Virgin and of St. Catherine.... April 24. To Miss Leigh Smith's, where I read my sermon on the Still Small Voice to a small company of friends, explaining that it was written in the first instance for the Concord Prison, and that I read it there to the convicts. I prefaced the serm
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