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Baroness Giacchetti (search for this): chapter 27
etter to Professor Lanciani, asking for a talk on the afternoon of February 9, proposing Houses and Housekeeping in Ancient Rome, and The Sibyls of Italy. Mr. Baddeley came in, and we had an interesting talk, mostly about the ancient Caesars, Mrs. Hollins asking, Why did the Romans put up with the bad Caesars? He thought the increase of wealth under Augustus was the beginning of a great deterioration of the people and the officials. January 21. Went in the afternoon to call upon Baroness Giacchetti. Had a pleasant talk with her husband, an enlightened man. He recognizes the present status of Rome as greatly superior to the ancient order of things — but laments the ignorance and superstition of the common people in general, and the peasantry in particular. A sick woman, restored to health by much trouble taken at his instance, instead of thanking him for his benefactions, told him that she intended to make a pilgrimage to the shrine of a certain Madonna, feeling sure that it wa
Gustave Dore (search for this): chapter 27
hree candidates:-- What manner of man is the first? Doctissimus. Doceat, says St. Thomas. And the second? Sanctissimus. Oret! and the third? Prudentissimus! Regat! Let him rule! says the Saint. February 20. To Methodist Church of Rev. Mr. Burt. A sensible short discourse — seems a very sincere man: has an earlier service for Italians, well attended. On my way home, stopped at Gargiulo's and bought a ragged but very good copy of the Divina Commedia, unbound, with Dore's illustrations. February 26. To tea at Mrs. Hazeltine's where met William Allen Butler, author of Nothing to weara bright-eyed, conversable man. Have a sitting to Anderson. When I returned from Mrs. Hazeltine's I found Hall Caine.... He told much about Gabriel Rossetti, with whom he had much to do. Rossetti was a victim of chloral, and Caine was set to keep him from it, except in discreet doses. March 4. Went to see the King and Queen, returning from the review of troops. They were c
g Irish lad of fourteen saved Draper's life by running to Bull Plain for aid. April 26. Lunch at Daisy Chanler's, to meet Mrs. Sanford, of Hamilton, Canada, who is here in the interests of the International Council of Women. She seems a nice, whole-souled woman.... I have promised to preside at a meeting, called at Daisy's rooms for Thursday, to carry forward such measures as we can and to introduce Mrs. Sanford and interpret for her. April 27. Devoted the forenoon to a composition in French, setting forth the objects of the meeting.... April 28. Went carefully over my French address. In the afternoon attended the meeting at Daisy's where I presided. This was the first time the Italian women had taken part in the International Council. April 30. To Contessa di Taverna at Palazzo Gabrielli, where I met the little knot of newly elected officers of the Council of Italian Women that is to be. Read them my report of our first meeting — they chattered a great deal. Mrs. Sa
d as usual by the heterogeneous attendance — tourists with campstools and without, ecclesiastics of various grades, students, friars; one splendid working-man in his corduroys stood like a statue, in an attitude of fixed attention. Lowly fathers and mothers carrying small children. One lady, seated high at the base of a column, put her feet on the seat of my stool behind me. Saw the gorgeous ring on the finger of the statue of St. Peter. January 19. Have composed a letter to Professor Lanciani, asking for a talk on the afternoon of February 9, proposing Houses and Housekeeping in Ancient Rome, and The Sibyls of Italy. Mr. Baddeley came in, and we had an interesting talk, mostly about the ancient Caesars, Mrs. Hollins asking, Why did the Romans put up with the bad Caesars? He thought the increase of wealth under Augustus was the beginning of a great deterioration of the people and the officials. January 21. Went in the afternoon to call upon Baroness Giacchetti. Had a pleasa
Villino Catucci (search for this): chapter 27
and the equestrian statue of Garibaldi crowning the height. We also drove through the Villa Pamfili Doria, which is very beautiful. January 6. To visit Countess Catucci at Villino Catucci. She was a Miss Mary Stearns, of Springfield, Massachusetts. Her husband has been an officer of the King's bersaglieri. Before the unifVillino Catucci. She was a Miss Mary Stearns, of Springfield, Massachusetts. Her husband has been an officer of the King's bersaglieri. Before the unification of Italy, he was sent to Perugia to reclaim deserters from among the recruits for the Italian army. Cardinal Pecci was then living near Perugia. Count Catucci called to assure him with great politeness that he would take his word and not search his premises. The Cardinal treated him with equal politeness, but declined toCount Catucci called to assure him with great politeness that he would take his word and not search his premises. The Cardinal treated him with equal politeness, but declined to continue the acquaintance after his removal to Rome, when he became Pope in 1878. January 12. The first meeting of our little circleat Miss Leigh Smith's, 17 Trinita dei Monti. I presided and introduced Richard Norton, who gave an interesting account of the American School of Archaeology at Athens, and of the excavations at At
mother had formerly known as the beautiful Marie Spartali, the friend of Rossetti and Du Maurier, the idol of literary and artistic London. A warm friendship grew up between them. Together they frequented the antiquaries, gleaning small treasures of ancient lace and peasant jewels. I bought this by the Muse Stillman's advice : this explanation guaranteed the wisdom of purchasing the small rose diamond ring set in black enamel. December 9. Dined with Daisy Chanler. We met there one Brewster and Hendrik Anderson. After dinner came Palmer [son of Courtland] and his sister. He is a pianist of real power and charm — made me think of Paderewski, when I first heard him .... December 10. Drove past the Trevi Fountain and to the Coliseum, where we walked awhile. Ladies came to hear me talk about Women's Clubs. This talk, which I had rather dreaded to give, passed off pleasantly.... Most of the ladies present expressed the desire to have a small and select club of women in Rome.
Gabriel Rossetti (search for this): chapter 27
of that day. His house was a meeting-place for artists and litterati. Mrs. Stillman our mother had formerly known as the beautiful Marie Spartali, the friend of Rossetti and Du Maurier, the idol of literary and artistic London. A warm friendship grew up between them. Together they frequented the antiquaries, gleaning small treaf Nothing to weara bright-eyed, conversable man. Have a sitting to Anderson. When I returned from Mrs. Hazeltine's I found Hall Caine.... He told much about Gabriel Rossetti, with whom he had much to do. Rossetti was a victim of chloral, and Caine was set to keep him from it, except in discreet doses. March 4. Went to see the Rossetti was a victim of chloral, and Caine was set to keep him from it, except in discreet doses. March 4. Went to see the King and Queen, returning from the review of troops. They were coldly received. She wore crimson velvet — he was on horseback and in uniform.... March 9. Club at Jessie Cochrane's; young Loyson, son of Pere Hyacinthe, gave an interesting lecture on the religion of Ancient Rome, which he traced back to its rude Latin beginning
. Had some good talk with Mr. D. [the American Ambassador]. He was brought up at Hopedale in the Community, of which his father was a member, his mother not altogether acquiescing. He went into our Civil War when only twenty years of age, having the day before married a wife. He was badly wounded in the battle of the Wilderness. Mosby [guerilla] met the wounded train, and stripped them of money and watches, taking also the horses of their conveyances. A young Irish lad of fourteen saved Draper's life by running to Bull Plain for aid. April 26. Lunch at Daisy Chanler's, to meet Mrs. Sanford, of Hamilton, Canada, who is here in the interests of the International Council of Women. She seems a nice, whole-souled woman.... I have promised to preside at a meeting, called at Daisy's rooms for Thursday, to carry forward such measures as we can and to introduce Mrs. Sanford and interpret for her. April 27. Devoted the forenoon to a composition in French, setting forth the objects of
Canon Farrar (search for this): chapter 27
ton Aide, who told me of the Spartali family. In the afternoon to Lady Kenmare's reception and later to dine with the Lindall Winthrops. April 11. In the afternoon Harriet Monroe, of Chicago, came and read her play — a parlor drama, ingenious and well written. The audience were much pleased with it. April 13.... In the evening dined with Theodore Davis and Mrs. Andrews. Davis showed us his treasures gathered on the Nile shore and gave me a scarab. April 18. .. Went to hear Canon Farrar on the Inferno of Dante — the lecture very scholarly and good. April 22. With Anderson to the Vatican, to see the Pinturicchio frescoes, which are very interesting. He designed the tiling for the floors, which is beautiful in color, matching well with the frescoes — these represent scenes in the life of the Virgin and of St. Catherine.... April 24. To Miss Leigh Smith's, where I read my sermon on the Still Small Voice to a small company of friends, explaining that it was written in th<
Hall Caine (search for this): chapter 27
pression gradually disappeared, and she found herself once more at home there. She met many people who interested her: Hall Caine, Bjornstjerne Bjornson, many artists too. Don Jose Villegas, the great Spanish painter (now Director of the Prado Museuthing to weara bright-eyed, conversable man. Have a sitting to Anderson. When I returned from Mrs. Hazeltine's I found Hall Caine.... He told much about Gabriel Rossetti, with whom he had much to do. Rossetti was a victim of chloral, and Caine was sCaine was set to keep him from it, except in discreet doses. March 4. Went to see the King and Queen, returning from the review of troops. They were coldly received. She wore crimson velvet — he was on horseback and in uniform.... March 9. Club at Jess dared to work to-day, as I am to read this afternoon. The reading was well attended and was more than well received. Hall Caine came afterwards, and talked long about the Bible. He does not appear to be familiar with the most recent criticism of
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