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Don Jose Villegas (search for this): chapter 27
Allies. handsome, dark like his mother, the others blond and a good deal like Marion in his early life. December 14. In the afternoon drove with Jack to visit Villegas. Found a splendid house with absolutely no fire — the cold of the studio was tomb-like. A fire was lighted in a stove and cakes were served, with some excellenlly disappeared, and she found herself once more at home there. She met many people who interested her: Hall Caine, Bjornstjerne Bjornson, many artists too. Don Jose Villegas, the great Spanish painter (now Director of the Prado Museum at Madrid), who was living in his famous Moorish villa on the Monte Parioli, made a brilliant, rme. It was an important and admirably conducted convention. The work for the uplift of the sex is going on steadily and well in Italy to-day. May 12. Sat to Villegas all forenoon. Had a little time on the terrace. Thought I would christen it the Praise God. The flowers seem to me to hold their silent high mass, swinging th
Katherine Thynne (search for this): chapter 27
fterwards to lunch with the dear Stillman Muse. Lady Airlie and the Thynne sisters were there. Had a pleasant talk with Lady Beatrice. ... . Wrote a letter to be read at the Suffrage Festival in Boston on May 17.... Lady Beatrice and Lady Katherine Thynne; the latter was married later to Lord Cromer, Viceroy of Egypt. The Ladies Thynne were passing the winter with their cousin, the Countess of Kenmare, at her pleasant apartment in the Via Gregoriana. Among the guests one met at Lady KenmThynne were passing the winter with their cousin, the Countess of Kenmare, at her pleasant apartment in the Via Gregoriana. Among the guests one met at Lady Kenmare's was a dark, handsome Monsignore who spoke English like an Oxford Don, and looked like a Torquemada. Later he became Papal Secretary of State and Cardinal Merry del Val. May 2. Have worked as usual. A pleasant late drive. Dined with Eleutherio, Her brother-in-law, Luther Terry. Daisy Chanler, and Dr. Bull; whist afterwards; news of an engagement and victory for us off Manila. May 4.... We dined with Marchese and Marchesa de Viti de Marco at Palazzo Orsini. Their rooms are very
Giuseppe Garibaldi (search for this): chapter 27
er Wesselhoeft condemned me to remain on one floor for a month. January 3, 1898. I feel that my Reminiscences will be disappointing to the world in general, if it ever troubles itself to read them,--I feel quite sure that it has neglected some good writing of mine, in verse and in prose. I cannot help anticipating for this book the same neglect, and this discourages me somewhat. In the afternoon drove to Monte Janiculo and saw the wonderful view of Rome, and the equestrian statue of Garibaldi crowning the height. We also drove through the Villa Pamfili Doria, which is very beautiful. January 6. To visit Countess Catucci at Villino Catucci. She was a Miss Mary Stearns, of Springfield, Massachusetts. Her husband has been an officer of the King's bersaglieri. Before the unification of Italy, he was sent to Perugia to reclaim deserters from among the recruits for the Italian army. Cardinal Pecci was then living near Perugia. Count Catucci called to assure him with great p
Waldo Story (search for this): chapter 27
March 15 ... .Mme. Helbig gave us an account of the Russian pilgrimage which came here lately. Many of the pilgrims were peasants. They travelled from Russia on foot, wearing bark shoes, which are very yielding and soft. These Russian ladies deprecated the action of Peter the Great in building St. Petersburg, and in forcing European civilization upon his nation, when still unprepared for it. March 18. ... Drove with Maud, to get white thorn from Villa Madama. Went afterwards to Mrs. Waldo Story's reception, where met Mrs. McTavish,. youngest daughter of General Winfield Scott. I was at school with one of her older sisters, Virginia, who became a nun. As the winter wore away and the early Roman spring broke, the last vestige of the discomfort of the first weeks vanished. The daily drives to the country in search of wild flowers were an endless delight, as well as the trips to the older quarters of the city. She found that, while during the first weeks she had lost the ha
Rose passed the evening with me. She told me that Pio Nono had endorsed the Rosminian philosophy, which had had quite a following in the Church, Cardinal Hohenlohe having been very prominent in this. When Leo XIII was elected, the Jesuits came to him and promised that he should have a Jubilee if he would take part against the Rosminian ideas, and put the books on the Index Expurgatorius, the which he promptly did. Hohenlohe is supposed to have been the real hero of the poisoning described in Zola's Rome --his servant died after having eaten of something which had been sent from the Vatican. December 25. Blessed Christmas Day! Maud and I went to St. Peter's to get, as she said, a whiff of the mass. We did not profit much by this, but met Edward Jackson, of Boston, and Monsignor Stanley, whom I had not seen in many years. We had a pleasant foregathering with him. In St. Peter's my mind became impressed with the immense intellectual force pledged to the upbuilding and upholding
Hendrik Anderson (search for this): chapter 27
et in black enamel. December 9. Dined with Daisy Chanler. We met there one Brewster and Hendrik Anderson. After dinner came Palmer [son of Courtland] and his sister. He is a pianist of real poweg account of the American School of Archaeology at Athens, and of the excavations at Athens.... Anderson to dine. He took a paper outline of my profile, wishing to model a bust of me. The Winthropamous Moorish villa on the Monte Parioli, made a brilliant, realistic portrait of her, and Hendrik Anderson, the Norwegian-American sculptor, modelled an interesting terra-cotta bust. While the sittilliam Allen Butler, author of Nothing to weara bright-eyed, conversable man. Have a sitting to Anderson. When I returned from Mrs. Hazeltine's I found Hall Caine.... He told much about Gabriel Rosser Canon Farrar on the Inferno of Dante — the lecture very scholarly and good. April 22. With Anderson to the Vatican, to see the Pinturicchio frescoes, which are very interesting. He designed the
Edward Jackson (search for this): chapter 27
ised that he should have a Jubilee if he would take part against the Rosminian ideas, and put the books on the Index Expurgatorius, the which he promptly did. Hohenlohe is supposed to have been the real hero of the poisoning described in Zola's Rome --his servant died after having eaten of something which had been sent from the Vatican. December 25. Blessed Christmas Day! Maud and I went to St. Peter's to get, as she said, a whiff of the mass. We did not profit much by this, but met Edward Jackson, of Boston, and Monsignor Stanley, whom I had not seen in many years. We had a pleasant foregathering with him. In St. Peter's my mind became impressed with the immense intellectual force pledged to the upbuilding and upholding of the Church of Rome. As this thought almost overpowered me, I remembered our dear Christ visiting the superb temple at Jerusalem and foretelling its destruction and the indestructibility of his own doctrine. On fair days she took her walk on the terrace,
ome. December 7. We visited the [William J.] Stillmans -S. and I had not met in thirty years, not since '67 in Athens. Went to afternoon tea at Miss Leigh Smith's. She is a cousin of Florence Nightingale, whom she resembles in appearance. Mme. Helbig was there, overflowing as ever with geniality and kindness. Mr. Stillman was then the Roman correspondent of the London Times, a position only second in importance to that of the British Ambassador. His tall, lean figure, stooping shoulderhe Primitive Aryan religion was the worship of ancestors. This also we see in Rome. A belief in immortality appears in the true Aryan faith. Man, finding himself human, and related to the divine, felt that he could not die. March 15 ... .Mme. Helbig gave us an account of the Russian pilgrimage which came here lately. Many of the pilgrims were peasants. They travelled from Russia on foot, wearing bark shoes, which are very yielding and soft. These Russian ladies deprecated the action of
Dennis O'Connell (search for this): chapter 27
Hall Caine came afterwards, and talked long about the Bible. He does not appear to be familiar with the most recent criticism of either Old or New Testament. March 24. There is a third silent party to all our bargains. [Emerson.] I find this passage in his essay on Compensation to-day for the first time, having written my essay on Moral Triangulation of the Third Party some thirty years ago. March 26. Dined with Mrs. McCreary--the Duke of San Martino took me in to dinner-Monsignor Dennis O'Connell sat on the other side of me. I had an interesting talk with him. Mrs. McCreary sang my Battle Hymn. They begged me to recite The Flag, which I did. Mrs. Pearse, daughter of Mario and Grisi, sang delightfully. March 30. A fine luncheon party given by Mrs. Iddings, wife of the American Secretary of Embassy at the Grand Hotel. Mme. Ristori was there; I had some glimpses of reminiscence with her. I met her with La terribila Medea, which I so well remember hearing from her. I prese
Christian Ross (search for this): chapter 27
e woman question, in which he seems much interested. He tells me of a friend, Zahm by name, now gone to a place in Indiana, who has biographies of the historical women of Bologna. February 9. Club at Mrs. Broadwood's. I read my Plea for Humor, which seemed to please the audience very much, especially Princess Talleyrand and Princess Poggia-Suasa. February 11. Read over my paper on Optimism and Pessimism and have got into the spirit of it. Maud's friends came at 3 P. M., among them Christian Ross, the painter, with Bjornstjerne Bjornson. February 16. To Mrs. Hurlburt's reception.--Talked with Countess Blank, an American married to a Pole. She had much to say of the piety of her Arab servant, who, she says, swallows fire, cuts himself with sharp things, etc., as acts of devotion!! Met Mr. Trench, son of the late Archbishop, Rev. Chevenix Trench. He has been Tennyson's publisher. Did not like T. personally — said he was often rude — read his own poems aloud constantly and ver
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