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ople together here, at my house, and we will form a Club, and it will be a good one too. the Journal of November 23 says:-- received word from Helen Winslow of a meeting of literary folks called for to-morrow morning at my house. this meeting was very pleasant: Mrs. Ward, Miss Winslow, Jacob Strauss, and Hezekiah Butterworth attended — later Herbert Ward came in. it was voted to form the Boston Authors' Club, and at a second meeting in December the Club was duly organized. in January the Authors' Club made its first public appearance in a meeting and dinner at hotel Vendome, Mrs. Howe presiding, Colonel Higginson (whom she described as her chief vice ) beside her. the brilliant and successful course of the Authors' Club need not be dwelt on here. Her connection with it was to continue through life, and its monthly meetings and annual dinners were among her pet pleasures. She was always ready to drop into rhyme in its service, the Muse in cap and bells being oftene
January 3rd (search for this): chapter 28
'n preserve us from our friend! “ she and her chief vice were always making merry together; when their flint and steel struck, the flash was laughter. It May have been at the Authors' Club that the two, with Edward Everett Hale and Dr. Holmes, were receiving compliments and tributes one afternoon. at least, she cried, no one can say that Boston drops its H's this was in the winter of 1900. it was the time of the Boer War, and all Christendom was sorrowing over the conflict. On January 3 the Journal says: this morning before rising, I had a sudden thought of the Christ-babe standing between the two armies, Boers and Britons, on Christmas day. I have devoted the morning to an effort to overtake the heavenly vision with but a mediocre result. these lines are published in at Sunset. on the 11th the cap and bells are assumed once more. ... to reception of the College Club, where I was to preside over the literary exercises and to introduce the readers. I was
January 9th (search for this): chapter 28
d through many years; she needed none of these things. Her past was always alive, and she went hand in hand with its dear and gracious figures. but we have outstripped the Journals and must go back to the beginning of 1899. [Boston.] January 1, 1899. I begin this year with an anxious mind. I am fighting the Wolf, hand to hand. I am also confused between the work already done on my reminiscences, and that still wanting to give them some completeness. May the all-father help me! January 9. dined with the Massachusetts Press Club Association. I made a little speech partly thought out beforehand. The best bit in it--why should we fear to pass from the old Testament of our own liberties, to the New Testament of liberty for all the world? --came to me on the spur of the moment.. .. January 16. .. Dickens party at the New England Woman's Club. I despaired of being able to go, but did manage to get up a costume and take part. many very comical travesties, those of Pickwic
January 16th (search for this): chapter 28
ng the Wolf, hand to hand. I am also confused between the work already done on my reminiscences, and that still wanting to give them some completeness. May the all-father help me! January 9. dined with the Massachusetts Press Club Association. I made a little speech partly thought out beforehand. The best bit in it--why should we fear to pass from the old Testament of our own liberties, to the New Testament of liberty for all the world? --came to me on the spur of the moment.. .. January 16. .. Dickens party at the New England Woman's Club. I despaired of being able to go, but did manage to get up a costume and take part. many very comical travesties, those of Pickwick and Captain Cuttle remarkably good; also Lucia M. Peabody as Martin Chuzzlewit, and Mrs. Godding in full male dress suit. I played a Virginia reel and finally danced myself. the part she herself took on this occasion was that of Mrs. Jellyby, a character she professed to resemble. At another Club party
January 23rd (search for this): chapter 28
m a bit when I thought they needed it! even militancy could be touched lightly by her. Talk was running high on the subject one day; eyes began to flash ominously, voices took on a wire edge, as she expressed it. Again the appeal was made. can you imagine, Mrs. Howe, under any circumstances-- the twinkle came into the gray eyes. well! she said. I am pretty old, but I think I could manage a broomstick! the tension broke in laughter, and the sisters were sisters once more. January 23. worked as usual. Attended the meeting in favor of the abolition of the death Penalty, which was interesting.... I spoke on the ground of hope. February 7.... I hope to take life more easily now than for some time past, and to have rest from the slavery of pen and ink. February 28. .... was interviewed by a Miss X, who has persevered in trying to see me, and at last brought a note from--. she is part editor of a magazine named success, and, having effected an entrance, proceeded to
February 4th (search for this): chapter 28
ou must n't call me an owl. I brought him forward and said, my dear minister says that I must not call him an owl, and I will not; only the owl is the bird of wisdom and he is very wise. I introduced Mrs. Moulton as a nightingale. For Trowbridge I could think of nothing and said, this bird will speak for himself. introduced N. H. Dole as a bird rarely seen, the phoenix. at the close E. E. H. Said, you have an admirable power of introducing. this little device pleased me foolishly. February 4. wrote a careful letter to W. F. Savage. He had written, asking an explanation of some old manuscript copy of my Battle Hymn and of the theft perpetrated of three of its verses in pen pictures of the War, only lately brought to my notice. He evidently thought these matters implied doubt at least of my having composed the Hymn. to this suspicion I did not allude, but showed him how the verses stolen had been altered, probably to avoid detection... March 3. Count di Campello's lecture,
February 7th (search for this): chapter 28
nously, voices took on a wire edge, as she expressed it. Again the appeal was made. can you imagine, Mrs. Howe, under any circumstances-- the twinkle came into the gray eyes. well! she said. I am pretty old, but I think I could manage a broomstick! the tension broke in laughter, and the sisters were sisters once more. January 23. worked as usual. Attended the meeting in favor of the abolition of the death Penalty, which was interesting.... I spoke on the ground of hope. February 7.... I hope to take life more easily now than for some time past, and to have rest from the slavery of pen and ink. February 28. .... was interviewed by a Miss X, who has persevered in trying to see me, and at last brought a note from--. she is part editor of a magazine named success, and, having effected an entrance, proceeded to interview me, taking down my words for her magazine, thus getting my ideas without payment, a very mean proceeding... . March 21. Tuskegee benefit, Hollis
February 28th (search for this): chapter 28
umstances-- the twinkle came into the gray eyes. well! she said. I am pretty old, but I think I could manage a broomstick! the tension broke in laughter, and the sisters were sisters once more. January 23. worked as usual. Attended the meeting in favor of the abolition of the death Penalty, which was interesting.... I spoke on the ground of hope. February 7.... I hope to take life more easily now than for some time past, and to have rest from the slavery of pen and ink. February 28. .... was interviewed by a Miss X, who has persevered in trying to see me, and at last brought a note from--. she is part editor of a magazine named success, and, having effected an entrance, proceeded to interview me, taking down my words for her magazine, thus getting my ideas without payment, a very mean proceeding... . March 21. Tuskegee benefit, Hollis Street Theatre. this meeting scored a triumph, not only for the performers, but for the race. Bishop Lawrence presided with m
ce pleased me foolishly. February 4. wrote a careful letter to W. F. Savage. He had written, asking an explanation of some old manuscript copy of my Battle Hymn and of the theft perpetrated of three of its verses in pen pictures of the War, only lately brought to my notice. He evidently thought these matters implied doubt at least of my having composed the Hymn. to this suspicion I did not allude, but showed him how the verses stolen had been altered, probably to avoid detection... March 3. Count di Campello's lecture, on the religious life in Italy, was most interesting. His uncle's movement in founding a National Italian Catholic Church seemed to me to present the first solution I have met with, of the absolute opposition between Catholic and Protestant. A Catholicism without spiritual tyranny, without ignorant superstition, would bridge over the interval between the two opposites and bring about the unification of the worldchurch.... March 13.... passed the whole mor
March 13th (search for this): chapter 28
to avoid detection... March 3. Count di Campello's lecture, on the religious life in Italy, was most interesting. His uncle's movement in founding a National Italian Catholic Church seemed to me to present the first solution I have met with, of the absolute opposition between Catholic and Protestant. A Catholicism without spiritual tyranny, without ignorant superstition, would bridge over the interval between the two opposites and bring about the unification of the worldchurch.... March 13.... passed the whole morning at State house, with remonstrants against petition forbidding Sunday evening concerts. T. W. H. Spoke remarkably well.. .. March 30. .. had a special good moment this morning before rising. Felt that God had granted me a good deal of heaven, while yet on earth. So the veil lifts sometimes, not for long. April found her in Minneapolis and St. Paul, lecturing and being delightfully entertained. May 8. Minneapolis. spoke at the University, which I foun
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