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New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 29
reatest trouble is that I use so poorly the precious time spared to me. Latterly I have been saying to myself, Can you not see that the drama is played out? This partly because my children wish me to give up public speaking. March 4.... To New England Woman's Club; first time this year, to my great regret and loss. I was cordially welcomed.... A thought suddenly came to me, namely, that the liberal education of women would give the death-blow to superstition. I said, We women have been th the Bancrofts' in New York, at which ex-President Van Buren was also present, and W. M. Thackeray, who said to me across the table that Browning's How they brought the good news was a good jingle. On the 29th she spoke at a meeting of the New England Woman's Club in memory of Dr. Zakrzewska, and records her final words:-- I pray God earnestly that we women may never go back from the ground which has been gained for us by our noble pioneers and leaders. I pray that these bright stars
Gardiner (Maine, United States) (search for this): chapter 29
very interesting, though rather difficult to follow. The theme was D'Annunzio's dramas, from which he gave some quotations and many characterizations. He relegates D'Annunzio to the Renaissance when Virtue had no real moral significance. Compared him with Ibsen. The occasion was exceedingly pleasant. To Laura I had hoped to go to church to-day, but my Maud and your Julia decided against it, and so I am having the day at home. It is just noon by my dial, and Maud is stretched in my Gardiner chair, comfortably shawled, and reading Lombroso's book on The man of genius, with steadfast attention. Lombroso's theory seems to be that genius, almost equally with insanity, is a result of degeneration.... March 1. The first day of spring, though in this climate this is a wintry month. I am thankful to have got on so far in this, my eighty-second year. My greatest trouble is that I use so poorly the precious time spared to me. Latterly I have been saying to myself, Can you not se
China (China) (search for this): chapter 29
fternoon, which I enjoyed but little, the music being of the multi-muddle order so much in vogue just now. An air of Haydn's sounded like a sentence of revelation in a chatter.. It may have been after this concert that she wrote these lines, found in one of her notebooks:--Such ugly noises never in my life My ears endured, such hideous fiddle-strife. A dozen street bands playing different tunes, A choir of chimney sweeps with various runes, The horn that doth to farmer's dinner call, The Chinese gong that serves in wealthier hall, The hammer, scrub brush, and beseeching broom, While here and there the guns of freedom boom, “Tzing! bang! this soul is saved!” “Clang! clang! it is n't!” And mich and dich and ich and sich and sisn't! Five dollar bills the nauseous treat secured, But what can pay the public that endured? March 17. Before lying down for a needed rest, I must record the wonderful reception given to-day to Jack Elliott's ceiling. The Triumph of Time, at the Pub
St. George, W. Va. (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 29
t Deland and dear Maud. On August 24 she writes:-- This day has been devoted to a family function of great interest, namely, the christening of Daisy and Wintie's boy baby, Theodore Ward, the President Theodore Roosevelt. himself standing godfather. Jack Elliott and I were on hand in good time, both of us in our best attire. We found a very chosen company, the Sydney Websters, Owen Wister, Senator Lodge and wife, the latter standing as godmother. Mr. Diman, of the School, St. George's, Newport. officiated, Parson Stone being ill. The President made his response quite audibly. The Chanler children looked lovely, and the baby as dear as a baby can look. His godfather gave him a beautiful silver bowl lined with gold. I gave a silver porringer, Maud a rattle with silver bells; lunch followed. President Roosevelt took me in to the table and seated me on his right. This was a very distinguished honor. The conversation was rather literary. The President admires Emerso
Cuba (Cuba) (search for this): chapter 29
rd so warm that she would never allow any adverse criticism of him in her presence. The following verses express this feeling:-- Here's to Teddy, Blythe and ready, Fit for each occasion! Who as he Acceptably Can represent the Nation? Neither ocean Binds his motion, Undismayed explorer; Challenge dares him, Pullman bears him Swifter than Aurora. Here's to Teddy! Let no eddy Block the onward current. Him we trust, And guard we must From schemes to sight abhorrent. When the tuba Called to Cuba Where the fight was raging, Rough and ready Riders led he, Valorous warfare waging. Here's to Teddy! Safe and steady, Loved by every section! South and North Will hurry forth To hasten his election. 1904. On September 12, a notice of the death of William Allen Butler is pasted in the Diary. Below it she writes:-- A pleasant man. I met him at the Hazeltines' in Rome in 1898 and 1899. His poem [Nothing to wear] was claimed by one or two people. I met his father [a Cabinet Ministe
Oak Glen (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): chapter 29
exact opposite, i.e., neglecting much of the nearest duty in the pursuit of an intellectual wisdom which I have not attained.... Maud and Florence were both away in the early part of this summer, and various grandchildren kept her company at Oak Glen. There were other visitors, among them Count Salome di Campello, a cheery guest who cooked spaghetti for her, and helped the granddaughter to set off the Fourth of July fireworks, to her equal pleasure and terror. During his visit she invited the Italian Ambassador Count Mayer des Planches. to spend a couple of days at Oak Glen. On July 14 she writes:-- Not having heard from the Italian Ambassador, the Count and I supposed that he was not coming. In the late afternoon came a letter saying that he would arrive to-morrow. We were troubled at this late intelligence, which gave me no time to invite people to meet the guest. I lay down for my afternoon rest with a very uneasy mind. Remembering St. Paul's words about Angels un
Leoni (Michigan, United States) (search for this): chapter 29
ell as their manager. I had to open. I felt so warm in my faith that for once I thought I might convert our opponents. I said much less than I had intended, as is usually the case with me when I speak extempore. February 7.... I went to see Leoni's wonderful illuminated representation of leading events in our history; a very remarkable work, and one which ought to remain in this country. February 11. Dreamed of an interview with a female pope. I had to go to Alliance Meeting to speak ossible for me to make a first move under so many responsibilities. A sudden light came into my soul at the thought that God will help me in any good undertaking, and with this there came an inkling of first steps to be taken with regard to Sig. Leoni's parchment. That is, to have it bought by some public society. I went to work again on my prize poem, with better success than hitherto ... February 14. Philosophy at Mrs. Bullard's.... Sent off my prize poem with scarcely any hope of its
Worcester (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 29
ay of the celebration of dear Chev's one hundredth birthday. Before starting for the Temple I received three beautiful gifts of flowers, a great bunch of white roses from Lizzie Agassiz, a lovely bouquet of violets from Mrs. Frank Batcheller, and some superb chrysanthemums from Mrs. George H. Perkins. The occasion was to me one of solemn joy and thankfulness. Senator Hoar presided with beautiful grace, preluding with some lovely reminiscences of Dr. Howe's visit to his office in Worcester, Massachusetts, when he, Hoar, was a young lawyer. Sanborn and Manatt excelled themselves, Humphreys did very well. Hoar requested me to stand up and say a few words, which I did, he introducing me in a very felicitous manner. I was glad to say my word, for my heart was deeply touched. With me on the platform were my dear children and Jack Hall and Julia Richards; Anagnos, of course; the music very good. Senator Hoar's words come back to us to-day, and we see his radiant smile as he led her
New York State (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 29
help others. In my mind I said, the obstacle to this is my natural inertia, my indolence; then the thought, God can overcome this indolence and give me increased power of service and zeal for it. Those present, I think, all considered the sermon and Communion as of special power and interest. It almost made me fear lest it should prove a swan song from the dear minister. Perhaps it is I, not he, who may soon depart. Later in April she was able to fulfil some lecture engagements in New York State with much enjoyment, but also much fatigue. After her return she felt for a little while as if it was about time for her to go, but her mind soon recovered its tone. Being gently reproved for giving a lecture and holding a reception on the same day, she said, That is perfectly proper: I gave and I received: I was scriptural and I was blessed. Asked on another occasion if it did not tire her to lecture,--Why, no! it is they [the audience] who are tired, not I! On April 27 she w
Newport (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 29
ad from one book-ridden house to the other, and there were certain books — the four-volume Oxford Bible, the big-print Horace, the Greek classics, shabby of dress, splendid of type and margin --which could surely have found their way to and from Newport unaided. One book she never asked for — the English dictionary! Once Maud, recently returned from Europe, apologized for having inadvertently taken the dictionary from 241 Beacon Street. How dreadful it was of me to take your dictionary! ack Elliott and I were on hand in good time, both of us in our best attire. We found a very chosen company, the Sydney Websters, Owen Wister, Senator Lodge and wife, the latter standing as godmother. Mr. Diman, of the School, St. George's, Newport. officiated, Parson Stone being ill. The President made his response quite audibly. The Chanler children looked lovely, and the baby as dear as a baby can look. His godfather gave him a beautiful silver bowl lined with gold. I gave a silver p
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