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eing still absent) she spoke four times in public, on four successive days. These addresses were at the Kindergarten for the Blind ( I missed the snap which Michael's presence was wont to give; I spoke praise of him to the children, as one to be held in dear remembrance; to the visitors, as having left the public a sacred legacy in these schools, which he created with so much labor ), at Faneuil Hall, a meeting about Old Home Week, at the West Newton High School, and at Providence. On the fifth day she was at the Wintergreen Club, answering the question, What is the greatest evil of the present day? --False estimates of values, vehement striving for what hinders rather than helps our spiritual development. After this bout she was glad to rest a day or two, but in another week was ready for the Woman Suffrage Festival. I to open it, evening, Faneuil Hall. A day of rushing. Lady Mary and Professor Gilbert Murray to breakfast 9 A. M., which I much enjoyed. Then my little music
January 11th (search for this): chapter 31
the drifts of notes and letters grew higher and higher among the piles of books, new and old. The books were not all her own choice. Many a firstling of verse found its way to her, inscribed with reverent or loving words by the author. Would Mrs. Howe send a few lines of appreciation or criticism? She would; mostly she did. She wrote in the autograph albums, and on the pieces of silk and cotton for autograph quilts : she signed the photographs: she tried to do everything they asked. January 11. Having hammered at some verses for General Lee, when I lay down to rest a perfect flood of rhymes seized me. Nonsense verses for to-morrow's festival; there seemed to be no end to them. I scrawled some of them down as it was late and dark. Sanborn to dine — unexpected, but always welcome. January 12. Copied and completed my lines for the evening. Found a large assemblage of members and invited guests [of the Authors' Club]; a dais and chair prepared for me, Colonel Higginson standi
January 12th (search for this): chapter 31
ould; mostly she did. She wrote in the autograph albums, and on the pieces of silk and cotton for autograph quilts : she signed the photographs: she tried to do everything they asked. January 11. Having hammered at some verses for General Lee, when I lay down to rest a perfect flood of rhymes seized me. Nonsense verses for to-morrow's festival; there seemed to be no end to them. I scrawled some of them down as it was late and dark. Sanborn to dine — unexpected, but always welcome. January 12. Copied and completed my lines for the evening. Found a large assemblage of members and invited guests [of the Authors' Club]; a dais and chair prepared for me, Colonel Higginson standing on my right. Many presentations — Gilder and Clyde Fitch, Owen Wister, Norman Hapgood. Aldrich [T. B.] took me in to dinner and sat on my right, Hon. John D. Long on my left; next beyond A. sat Homans Womans. Mrs. Charles Homans. I despaired of making my jingle tell in so large and unfamiliar a comp
January 13th (search for this): chapter 31
n D. Long on my left; next beyond A. sat Homans Womans. Mrs. Charles Homans. I despaired of making my jingle tell in so large and unfamiliar a company. At last I took courage and read it, bad as I thought it. To my surprise, it told, and created the merriment which had been my object so far as I had any. My Battle Hymn was sung finely by a male quartette. Colonel Higginson and I were praised almost out of our senses. A calendar, got up with much labor, was presented to each of us. January 13. To church, to take down my vanity after last evening's laudations.... January 15. Made a final copy of my lines on Robert E. Lee,--read them to Rosalind — the last line drew a tear from each of us, so I concluded that it would do and sent it. To Tuesday Club, where the effort which I made to hear speakers tired my head badly. Themes: Whether and how to teach Ethics in public schools; also, The English Education bill. Socrates having been mentioned as an exemplar, I suddenly cried o
January 15th (search for this): chapter 31
paired of making my jingle tell in so large and unfamiliar a company. At last I took courage and read it, bad as I thought it. To my surprise, it told, and created the merriment which had been my object so far as I had any. My Battle Hymn was sung finely by a male quartette. Colonel Higginson and I were praised almost out of our senses. A calendar, got up with much labor, was presented to each of us. January 13. To church, to take down my vanity after last evening's laudations.... January 15. Made a final copy of my lines on Robert E. Lee,--read them to Rosalind — the last line drew a tear from each of us, so I concluded that it would do and sent it. To Tuesday Club, where the effort which I made to hear speakers tired my head badly. Themes: Whether and how to teach Ethics in public schools; also, The English Education bill. Socrates having been mentioned as an exemplar, I suddenly cried out that I thought he did wrong to stay and suffer by unjust laws and popular superst
January 18th (search for this): chapter 31
took heart for the future. In April she records a delightful visit from Robert Collyer, accompanied by Annie Fields. I asked him: Robert, what is religion? He replied, To love God with all one's heart, Christ helping us. He began his prayer last Sunday thus: Our Father who art in heaven, on earth, and in hell! On April 13, she was out for the first time since February 14, when I returned sick from Baltimore ... . Another week and she was at her church, for the first time since January 18. It had been a long and weary time, yet one remembers not so much the suffering and confinement as the gayety of it. There was a sigh for the Journal, but for the family, and the faithful nurse,-- Quips and cranks, and wanton wiles, Nods and becks, and wreathed smiles. This nurse was known to others as Lucy Voshell, but her patient promptly named her Wollapuk. 1 It may be noted that this epidemic of tonsillitis was actually fatal to Miss Susan B. Anthony, who never recovered f
January 25th (search for this): chapter 31
made to hear speakers tired my head badly. Themes: Whether and how to teach Ethics in public schools; also, The English Education bill. Socrates having been mentioned as an exemplar, I suddenly cried out that I thought he did wrong to stay and suffer by unjust laws and popular superstition. A first-class American would have got away and would have fought those people to the bitter death. This fiery little episode provoked laughter, and several privately told me they were glad of it. January 25.... Read Colonel Higginson's account of me in the Outlook. Wrote him a note of thanks, saying that he has written beautifully, with much tact and kindness. It remains true that he has not much acquaintance with the serious side of my life and character, my studies of philosophy, etc. He has described what he has seen of me and has certainly done it with skill and with a most kind intention. She said of the Colonel's paper, He does not realize that my life has been here, the four walls
February 4th (search for this): chapter 31
s table. I am sheltered under His roof. While I still felt this joy, a lone man, passing by, broke into a complaint on the hardness of things. I wanted in my dream to call him back, but he passed too rapidly. I still see in my mind's eye that blue sky and the lone man passing by, I still recall the thrill of that meditation, literally in Dreamland, as I was quite asleep when it visited me. ... The great event of this winter was a trip to Baltimore for a Woman Suffrage Convention. February 4. I had not been able to think of anything to say in Baltimore, but this morning it seemed to come to me. I have just written out my screed, . . taking a point of view which I do not think I have presented before, viz.: that inferior education and restricted activity made women the inferiors of men, as naturally as training, education, and free agency make civilized men the superior of the savage. I think that the dear Lord gave me this screed, which is short and simple enough, but, I thin
February 5th (search for this): chapter 31
l Higginson's account of me in the Outlook. Wrote him a note of thanks, saying that he has written beautifully, with much tact and kindness. It remains true that he has not much acquaintance with the serious side of my life and character, my studies of philosophy, etc. He has described what he has seen of me and has certainly done it with skill and with a most kind intention. She said of the Colonel's paper, He does not realize that my life has been here, the four walls of my room. February 5.... Began a sermon on the text, I saw Satan like lightning fall from heaven. ... February 6. Wrote a good bit on the sermon begun yesterday — the theme attracts me much. If I give it, I will have Whittier's hymn sung: Oh! sometimes gleams upon our sight-- Wrote to thank Higginson for sending me word that I am the first woman member of the society of American Authors..... February 14. Luncheon at 3 Joy Street. .My seat was between T. W. H. and President Eliot, with whom I had no
February 6th (search for this): chapter 31
tten beautifully, with much tact and kindness. It remains true that he has not much acquaintance with the serious side of my life and character, my studies of philosophy, etc. He has described what he has seen of me and has certainly done it with skill and with a most kind intention. She said of the Colonel's paper, He does not realize that my life has been here, the four walls of my room. February 5.... Began a sermon on the text, I saw Satan like lightning fall from heaven. ... February 6. Wrote a good bit on the sermon begun yesterday — the theme attracts me much. If I give it, I will have Whittier's hymn sung: Oh! sometimes gleams upon our sight-- Wrote to thank Higginson for sending me word that I am the first woman member of the society of American Authors..... February 14. Luncheon at 3 Joy Street. .My seat was between T. W. H. and President Eliot, with whom I had not spoken in many years. He spoke to me at once and we shook hands and conversed very cordially
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