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Oak Glen (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): chapter 32
and reverent interest. These are Boston memories, but those of Oak Glen are no less tender and vivid. There, too, the meals were festivalrrangement of keys made it possible for her room to be entered; at Oak Glen there was but the one stout door. On this occasion, after lying h me some flowers and a curious orchid from Panama. November 3. Oak Glen. Yesterday and to-day have had most exquisite sittings in front of letter was written while she was at work on the poem:-- To Laura Oak Glen, July 9, 1909. Why, yes, I'm doing the best I know how. Have wrss you, not much wiser than your affectionate Ma. Returned to Oak Glen, after the celebration, she writes:-- To her son and his wife OOak Glen, October 1, 1909. .. I found my trees still green, and everything comfortable. I did not dare to write to any one yesterday, my hegh of her children's generation, she had adopted him as an uncle. Oak Glen, October 1, 1909. Dear Uncle George,-- I got through all rig
Northampton (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 32
reminded her happily of her father's house, of Henry playing tolerably on the 'cello, Marion studying the violin, Broa Sam's lovely tenor voice. Now came the early October days when she was to receive the degree of Doctor of Laws from Smith College. She hesitated about making the tiresome journey, but finally, Grudging the trouble and expense, I decide to go to Smith College, for my degree, but think I won't do so any more. She started accordingly with daughter and maid, for Northampton, Massachusetts. It was golden weather, and she was in high spirits. Various college dignitaries met her at the station; one of these had given up a suite of rooms for her use; she was soon established in much peace and comfort. Wednesday, October 5, was a day of perfect autumn beauty. She was early dressed in her white dress, with the college gown of rich black silk over it, the mortarboard covering in like manner her white lace cap. Thus arrayed, a wheeled chair conveyed her to the great
Boston (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 32
dies visiting Newport. (N. B. She was late for the reception, and her neighbor, Bradford Norman, drove her into Newport in his automobile at a terrific clip. On alighting, Braddie, she said, if I were ten years younger, I would set up one of these hell-wagons myself! ) She enjoyed all this hugely, but the fatigue was followed by distress so great that the next morning she thought she should die with her door locked. (She would lock her door: no prayers of ours availed against this. In Boston, an elaborate arrangement of keys made it possible for her room to be entered; at Oak Glen there was but the one stout door. On this occasion, after lying helpless and despairing for some time, she managed to unlock the door and call the faithful maid.) On June 30 she writes:-- Oh, beautiful last day of Junel Perhaps my last June on earth.... I shall be thankful to live as long as I can be of comfort or help to any one ... July 12.... Sherman to Corse [Civil War], Can you hold ou
Christmas (New Mexico, United States) (search for this): chapter 32
approach to a secretary ever tolerated. We used to grieve because our mother had no firstrate Crutch ; it seemed a waste of power. Now, we see that it was partly the instinct of selfpreservation,--keeping the doing muscles tense and strong, because action was vital and necessary to her — partly the still deeper instinct of giving her self, body and mind. She seldom failed in any important thing she undertook; the chores of life she often left for others to attend to or neglect. The Christmas services, the Christmas oratorio, brought her the usual serene joy and comfort. She insists that Handel wrote parts of the Messiah in heaven itself. Where else could he have got Comfort ye, Thy rebuke, Thou shalt break them, and much besides? Late in December, 1908, came the horror of the Sicilian earthquake. She felt at first that it was impossible to reconcile omnipotence and perfect benevolence with this catastrophe. We must hold judgment in suspense and say, We don't and we ca
Newport (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 32
nerwise to each other, but so that we can fit into line, and stand and act in concert. . . . Newport. I begin to feel something of the labor and sorrow of living so long. I don't even enjoy my bont up to Boston to deliver it, came back to meet an excursion party of Biennial ladies visiting Newport. (N. B. She was late for the reception, and her neighbor, Bradford Norman, drove her into NewpNewport in his automobile at a terrific clip. On alighting, Braddie, she said, if I were ten years younger, I would set up one of these hell-wagons myself! ) She enjoyed all this hugely, but the fatevery word tells. In early September she performed a very small public service, unveiling in Newport a bronze tablet in honor of Count de Rochambeau. She would have been glad to speak, but an anxy possible? A day or two later, she was giving an offhand talk on the early recollections of Newport at the Papeterie, and going to an afternoon tea at a musical house, where, after listening to S
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 32
don't need no cogito, ergo sum, which is what Carty, old Boy, amounts to. Your letter, dear, was a very proper attention under the circumstances. Should n't object to another. Lemme see! objects cannot be subjects, nor vice versa. How do you know that you washed your face this morning? You don't know it, and I don't believe that you did. You might consult H. Richards about some of these particulars. He is a man of some sense. You are, bless you, not much wiser than your affectionate Ma. Returned to Oak Glen, after the celebration, she writes:-- To her son and his wife Oak Glen, October 1, 1909. .. I found my trees still green, and everything comfortable. I did not dare to write to any one yesterday, my head was so full of nonsense. Reaction from brain-fatigue takes this shape with me, and everything goes higgle-wiggledy, hi-cockalorum, or words to that effect. ... We had a delightful visit with you, dear F. G. and H. M. I miss you both, and miss the lovely panoram
New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 32
night than usual, for dear Uncle John said to me, You singed good! Poor Huti played the 'cello. Now, I listened for the familiar bits, and recognized the drinking chorus in Act 1st, the Rataplan in Act 2d. Valentine's prayer, if given, was so overlaid with fioritura that I did not feel sure of it. The page's pretty song was all right, but I suffered great fatigue, and the reminiscences were sad. Through the winter she continued the study of economics with some fifteen members of the New England Woman's Club. She read Bergson too, and now and then got completely bogged in him, finding no central point that led anywhere. About this time she wrote:-- Some rules for everyday life 1. Begin every day with a few minutes of retired meditation, tending to prayer, in order to feel within yourself the spiritual power which will enable you to answer the demands of practical life. 2. Cultivate systematic employment and learn to estimate correctly the time required to accomplish
Sorrento (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 32
especially when they are faithful and incorruptible, apropos of aspersions cast on Roosevelt and Taft. Mrs. Ward read a very violent attack upon some public man of a hundred or more years ago. He was quoted as a monster of tyranny and injustice. His name was George Washington. April 8.... My prayer for this Easter is that I may not waste the inspiration of spring.... In these days came another real sorrow to her. April 10. To-day brings the sad news of Marion Crawford's death at Sorrento. His departure seems to have been a peaceful one. He comforted his family and had his daughter Eleanor read Plato's Dialogues to him. Was unconscious at the last. Poor dear Marion! The end, in his case, comes early. His father was, I think, in the early forties when he died of a cancer behind the eye which caused blindness. He, Thomas Crawford, had a long and very distressing illness. Crawford had been very dear to her, ever since the days when, a radiant schoolboy, he came and wen
Providence, R. I. (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 32
still, as you and many of the juniors do. Wishing that I might sometimes see you, believe me Yours with affectionate regard, Julia Ward Howe. Close upon the Birthday came another occasion of the kind which we — in these later years — at once welcomed and deplored. She enjoyed nothing so much as a function, and nothing tired her so much. On June 16, Brown University, her husband's alma mater and her grandfather's, conferred upon her the degree of Doctor of Laws. She went to Providence to receive it in person, and thus describes the commencement exercises to Mrs. Mitchell:-- The ordeal of the Doctorate was rather trying, but was made as easy as possible for me. The venerable old church was well filled, and was quite beautiful. I sat in one of the front pews--two learned people led me to the foot of the platform from which President Faunce, with some laudatory remarks, handed me my diploma, while some third party placed a picturesque hood upon my shoulders. The band
The Hague (Netherlands) (search for this): chapter 32
The little essay counts but seventy lines, but every word tells. In early September she performed a very small public service, unveiling in Newport a bronze tablet in honor of Count de Rochambeau. She would have been glad to speak, but an anxious daughter had demurred, and at the moment she only thought of pulling the string the right way. September 21. Green Peace, New York. A delightful drive with Mr. Seth Low in his auto. A good talk with him about the multi-millionnaires and the Hague Conferences which he has attended. We reached Green Peace in time for Mr. Frank Potter to sing about half of my songs. He has a fine tenor voice, well cultivated, and is very kind about my small compositions. I had not counted upon this pleasure. I dreaded this visit, for the troublesome journey, but it has been delightful. I am charmed to see my son so handsomely and comfortably established, and with a very devoted wife. Potter brought me some flowers and a curious orchid from Pana
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