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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments.. Search the whole document.

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Lexington (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 109
ho had been made prisoner at Ball's Bluff while captain of the 15th Infantry, and after his release commissioned major of the 34th Mass. Infantry. It was assigned to General Burnside's command and joined the 9th Corps near Sharpsburg, Md., September 21, forming part of the 3d Brigade, 1st Division. It was present at the battle of Fredericksburg, and moving in February, 1863, to Newport News, it left there March 23 to join General Burnside in the department of the Ohio and was posted at Lexington, Ky., moving afterward to Nicholasville and Middleburg. It formed part of the forces sent to Vicksburg in June, where it took part in the siege and in the movement to Jackson, Miss. Returning to Kentucky, it moved to Knoxville, Tenn., in September, was active at Blue Springs October 10, was closely engaged at Campbell's Station November 16, and was on duty during the siege. It returned to Annapolis, Md., in April, 1864, where by the reorganization of the 9th Corps it became, under Major Dr
Blue Springs (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 109
3d Brigade, 1st Division. It was present at the battle of Fredericksburg, and moving in February, 1863, to Newport News, it left there March 23 to join General Burnside in the department of the Ohio and was posted at Lexington, Ky., moving afterward to Nicholasville and Middleburg. It formed part of the forces sent to Vicksburg in June, where it took part in the siege and in the movement to Jackson, Miss. Returning to Kentucky, it moved to Knoxville, Tenn., in September, was active at Blue Springs October 10, was closely engaged at Campbell's Station November 16, and was on duty during the siege. It returned to Annapolis, Md., in April, 1864, where by the reorganization of the 9th Corps it became, under Major Draper, part of the 1st Brigade, 2d Division; was engaged with loss at the Wilderness on May 6 and suffered greatly in the charge at Spotsylvania Court House May 12. On the 14th and 16th of May a detachment from the 29th Mass. Infantry, which had joined the regiment Jan. 30,
Farmville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 109
whose term of service had expired, left for Massachusetts for muster out. Under command of Captain Barker the regiment took active part at Cold Harbor June 2, and shared with its division in the assault of Petersburg June 17. It was active afterward in the siege, engaging in the operations on the Weldon Railroad in August, at Pegram Farm or Poplar Spring Church Sept. 30, and at Hatcher's Run in October. In the latter part of October the 21st Battalion Mass. Volunteers was transferred to the 36th Infantry, which was consolidated into companies A to G, the 21st Battalion becoming companies H, I and K. After the fall of Petersburg the regiment moved to Farmville and served on provost duty; returning, it reached Alexandria April 28 and encamped at Fort Lyon until its muster out of service June 8, 1865. Reaching Massachusetts on the 10th, it was paid off and discharged at Readville June 19, 1865. The recruits and men from the 21st regiment were transferred to the 56th Mass. Infantry.
Worcester (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 109
s of regiment,— Officers,1568–––––––––––83 Enlisted men, Including non-commissioned staff.9–102100971041069810114118414641,192 Totals,–––––––––––––1,275 The 36th Mass. Infantry was organized in the summer of 1862 at Camp John E. Wool, Worcester, in response to the President's call for three years troops in July. The regiment represented in its members the towns of Charlestown, Winchendon and vicinity, and the eastern and western towns of Worcester County. On September 2 it left campWorcester County. On September 2 it left camp for Washington, under command of Col. Henry Bowman, who had been made prisoner at Ball's Bluff while captain of the 15th Infantry, and after his release commissioned major of the 34th Mass. Infantry. It was assigned to General Burnside's command and joined the 9th Corps near Sharpsburg, Md., September 21, forming part of the 3d Brigade, 1st Division. It was present at the battle of Fredericksburg, and moving in February, 1863, to Newport News, it l
Middleburg (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 109
ain of the 15th Infantry, and after his release commissioned major of the 34th Mass. Infantry. It was assigned to General Burnside's command and joined the 9th Corps near Sharpsburg, Md., September 21, forming part of the 3d Brigade, 1st Division. It was present at the battle of Fredericksburg, and moving in February, 1863, to Newport News, it left there March 23 to join General Burnside in the department of the Ohio and was posted at Lexington, Ky., moving afterward to Nicholasville and Middleburg. It formed part of the forces sent to Vicksburg in June, where it took part in the siege and in the movement to Jackson, Miss. Returning to Kentucky, it moved to Knoxville, Tenn., in September, was active at Blue Springs October 10, was closely engaged at Campbell's Station November 16, and was on duty during the siege. It returned to Annapolis, Md., in April, 1864, where by the reorganization of the 9th Corps it became, under Major Draper, part of the 1st Brigade, 2d Division; was enga
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 109
May 6 and suffered greatly in the charge at Spotsylvania Court House May 12. On the 14th and 16th of May a detachment from the 29th Mass. Infantry, which had joined the regiment Jan. 30, 1864, and whose term of service had expired, left for Massachusetts for muster out. Under command of Captain Barker the regiment took active part at Cold Harbor June 2, and shared with its division in the assault of Petersburg June 17. It was active afterward in the siege, engaging in the operations on the Wth Infantry, which was consolidated into companies A to G, the 21st Battalion becoming companies H, I and K. After the fall of Petersburg the regiment moved to Farmville and served on provost duty; returning, it reached Alexandria April 28 and encamped at Fort Lyon until its muster out of service June 8, 1865. Reaching Massachusetts on the 10th, it was paid off and discharged at Readville June 19, 1865. The recruits and men from the 21st regiment were transferred to the 56th Mass. Infantry.
Annapolis (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 109
there March 23 to join General Burnside in the department of the Ohio and was posted at Lexington, Ky., moving afterward to Nicholasville and Middleburg. It formed part of the forces sent to Vicksburg in June, where it took part in the siege and in the movement to Jackson, Miss. Returning to Kentucky, it moved to Knoxville, Tenn., in September, was active at Blue Springs October 10, was closely engaged at Campbell's Station November 16, and was on duty during the siege. It returned to Annapolis, Md., in April, 1864, where by the reorganization of the 9th Corps it became, under Major Draper, part of the 1st Brigade, 2d Division; was engaged with loss at the Wilderness on May 6 and suffered greatly in the charge at Spotsylvania Court House May 12. On the 14th and 16th of May a detachment from the 29th Mass. Infantry, which had joined the regiment Jan. 30, 1864, and whose term of service had expired, left for Massachusetts for muster out. Under command of Captain Barker the regiment t
Sharpsburg (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 109
s call for three years troops in July. The regiment represented in its members the towns of Charlestown, Winchendon and vicinity, and the eastern and western towns of Worcester County. On September 2 it left camp for Washington, under command of Col. Henry Bowman, who had been made prisoner at Ball's Bluff while captain of the 15th Infantry, and after his release commissioned major of the 34th Mass. Infantry. It was assigned to General Burnside's command and joined the 9th Corps near Sharpsburg, Md., September 21, forming part of the 3d Brigade, 1st Division. It was present at the battle of Fredericksburg, and moving in February, 1863, to Newport News, it left there March 23 to join General Burnside in the department of the Ohio and was posted at Lexington, Ky., moving afterward to Nicholasville and Middleburg. It formed part of the forces sent to Vicksburg in June, where it took part in the siege and in the movement to Jackson, Miss. Returning to Kentucky, it moved to Knoxville
Station West (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 109
attle of Fredericksburg, and moving in February, 1863, to Newport News, it left there March 23 to join General Burnside in the department of the Ohio and was posted at Lexington, Ky., moving afterward to Nicholasville and Middleburg. It formed part of the forces sent to Vicksburg in June, where it took part in the siege and in the movement to Jackson, Miss. Returning to Kentucky, it moved to Knoxville, Tenn., in September, was active at Blue Springs October 10, was closely engaged at Campbell's Station November 16, and was on duty during the siege. It returned to Annapolis, Md., in April, 1864, where by the reorganization of the 9th Corps it became, under Major Draper, part of the 1st Brigade, 2d Division; was engaged with loss at the Wilderness on May 6 and suffered greatly in the charge at Spotsylvania Court House May 12. On the 14th and 16th of May a detachment from the 29th Mass. Infantry, which had joined the regiment Jan. 30, 1864, and whose term of service had expired, left
Winchendon (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 109
above) serving elsewhere within regiment.––––––1111–––4 Totals,6–3442234633–40 Actual total of members of regiment,— Officers,1568–––––––––––83 Enlisted men, Including non-commissioned staff.9–102100971041069810114118414641,192 Totals,–––––––––––––1,275 The 36th Mass. Infantry was organized in the summer of 1862 at Camp John E. Wool, Worcester, in response to the President's call for three years troops in July. The regiment represented in its members the towns of Charlestown, Winchendon and vicinity, and the eastern and western towns of Worcester County. On September 2 it left camp for Washington, under command of Col. Henry Bowman, who had been made prisoner at Ball's Bluff while captain of the 15th Infantry, and after his release commissioned major of the 34th Mass. Infantry. It was assigned to General Burnside's command and joined the 9th Corps near Sharpsburg, Md., September 21, forming part of the 3
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