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Browsing named entities in Cambridge sketches (ed. Estelle M. H. Merrill).

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Louis Agassiz (search for this): chapter 1
List of illustrations. Shepard Memorial Church . . Frontispiece. Cragie House. (from The Boston picture Book), 29 Elmwood (from The Boston picture Book ) . .35 The First Church . . . . . . . . . . . 44 The Old Parsonage of First Church .. 49 Rev. Dr. Holmes' House .. . . . . 53 The Harvard Gate (from Souvenir of the Hub), 86 Harvard College Views: John the Orangeman, College Buildings, etc. (from The Boston picture Book) . . ..... 90 Gore Hall (Harvard Library) ... .. 94 Appleton Chapel ........... 97 Memorial Hall (from Souvenir of the Hub) . 101 Interior of Memorial Hall ........ 105 Dining rooms, Memorial Hall ..... . 109 The grave of Agassiz (from the Cambridge Tribune), 124 Harvard Observatory . .. ...... 132 Fay house, home of Radcliffe College . . . 212 The Washington Elm (from The Boston picture Book). 215
Abiel Holmes (search for this): chapter 1
List of illustrations. Shepard Memorial Church . . Frontispiece. Cragie House. (from The Boston picture Book), 29 Elmwood (from The Boston picture Book ) . .35 The First Church . . . . . . . . . . . 44 The Old Parsonage of First Church .. 49 Rev. Dr. Holmes' House .. . . . . 53 The Harvard Gate (from Souvenir of the Hub), 86 Harvard College Views: John the Orangeman, College Buildings, etc. (from The Boston picture Book) . . ..... 90 Gore Hall (Harvard Library) ... .. 94 Appleton Chapel ........... 97 Memorial Hall (from Souvenir of the Hub) . 101 Interior of Memorial Hall ........ 105 Dining rooms, Memorial Hall ..... . 109 The grave of Agassiz (from the Cambridge Tribune), 124 Harvard Observatory . .. ...... 132 Fay house, home of Radcliffe College . . . 212 The Washington Elm (from The Boston picture Book). 215
Cambridge (search for this): chapter 2
Preface. Dr. Alexander McKenzie. This is not a guide book in the ordinary sense of that term. But it does take the reader into the life of Cambridge and makes known to him something of the past and the present of the town. Any one should feel more at home here after reading these pages, and he can readily find where his life might be joined to the common life and be enriched by it while he imparts to it of his own force. The extension of the town has been steady and rapid. The hamlet which held so large a place in the colonial life has constantly advanced to the city whose influence is felt through the land. To those who have watched this growth, and shared in it, it has been of great interest to mark the appearance of new institutions, of new forms of work, of new endeavors for the general advantage. The city must have been poorer than she knew before the Library and Hospital were built, and the societies formed which are now so prominent and so efficient for good. I
Alexander Mckenzie (search for this): chapter 2
Preface. Dr. Alexander McKenzie. This is not a guide book in the ordinary sense of that term. But it does take the reader into the life of Cambridge and makes known to him something of the past and the present of the town. Any one should feel more at home here after reading these pages, and he can readily find where his life might be joined to the common life and be enriched by it while he imparts to it of his own force. The extension of the town has been steady and rapid. The hamletney which they can give for its enlargement. The Association should have a house of its own. It should be a building large enough and good enough for the admirable work which is to be done. It should have ample XII rooms and all the appliances which it can use. Happy is that person who can thus endow an institution of immediate and increasing beneficence. While the reader wanders along these waiting pages will he kindly think upon these things? Alexander McKenzie. 8th October, 1895.
October 8th, 1895 AD (search for this): chapter 2
so far as may be, the Association offers a home with its security, its refinement, its friendship, its instruction, its mutual assistance. With a liberal constitution, broad enough for all who call themselves Christians, the women of many churches of many names join in these labors of love and joy. I am left free to say what I will in this introduction. But I am glad to commend this Association to the active and generous confidence of all who have time which they can use in its work, or money which they can give for its enlargement. The Association should have a house of its own. It should be a building large enough and good enough for the admirable work which is to be done. It should have ample XII rooms and all the appliances which it can use. Happy is that person who can thus endow an institution of immediate and increasing beneficence. While the reader wanders along these waiting pages will he kindly think upon these things? Alexander McKenzie. 8th October, 1895.
Cambridge Sketches (search for this): chapter 3
The Book Committee of the Cambridge Young Women's Christian Association wishes to thank most cordially the writers who have contributed to this volume, often at great personal inconvenience to themselves; the publishers of The Boston picture Book, Souvenir of the Hub, and the Tribune for cuts loaned; the Cambridge newspapers for notices so freely given; the advertisers, and all others who have aided in the endeavor to make a literary and financial success of (Cambridge Sketches.
shroud were found, and a quantity of tansy which had been used as a disinfectant. Thus the work of goodman Orton again saw the light. One of the delicate matters in those days was the arranging of people and their names in the proper order. Not until 1773 were the names in the Harvard Catalogue placed in alphabetical order. The rank of the family to which the student belonged determined his place in the list. The first class starts in this way:-- Benjamin Woodbridge, A. M. Oxford 1648; S. T. D. Oxford. George Downing, Knight 1660, Baronet 1663; Ambass. to Netherlands from Cromwell to Charles II; M. P. Here we have the honors acquired by the sons added to those which they had inherited. In the meeting house, when the town was established in an orderly way, a proper regard was had to the position of the families and individuals. Often the house was finished by degrees. At first benches would be put in. Then some one who wished a place of his own would procure
mee. As we look back to those times it seems as if life must have been dull and hard. It would be so to us if we were placed in it, but if we had been born into it it would not have been so. Those who had come from England felt the difference between the old world and the new; but they did not look for much comfort in the wilderness, and whatever they lacked, they had themselves and their books and their own courage and faith. They had good books. Shakespeare died in 1616 and Bacon in 1626; their works were new and fresh, and there were other writers of great interest and worth. The Puritans did not spend much money on sports, but they spent money on schools, and they built a college. We commonly see their faces in repose and they look stern; but they had their glad hours when men smiled and children played. Home, love, marriage, and the joys which these terms suggest were here. The woods and streams gave the best of recreation to the boys when their tasks were finished. T
At first benches would be put in. Then some one who wished a place of his own would procure the deed of a space on the floor, some six feet square, and on this he would erect a pit or pew. He was required to keep this in repair and also all the glass against it. When there was no such private arrangement a committee assigned the seats after their own discretion and according to the rank of the family, or their age or property. This was called dignifying the house. There is the record in 1658, That the elders, deacons and selectmen for the time being shall be a constant and settled power for regulating the sitting of persons in the meeting house from time to tine as need shall require. In 1662 we come upon the work of the committee in such directions as these:-- Bro. Ri. Jackson's wife to sit there where sister Kempster was wont to sit. Mrs. Ulpham with her mother, Ester Sparlawke, in the place where Mrs. Upham is removed from. Joanna Winship in the place where Ester S
s a disinfectant. Thus the work of goodman Orton again saw the light. One of the delicate matters in those days was the arranging of people and their names in the proper order. Not until 1773 were the names in the Harvard Catalogue placed in alphabetical order. The rank of the family to which the student belonged determined his place in the list. The first class starts in this way:-- Benjamin Woodbridge, A. M. Oxford 1648; S. T. D. Oxford. George Downing, Knight 1660, Baronet 1663; Ambass. to Netherlands from Cromwell to Charles II; M. P. Here we have the honors acquired by the sons added to those which they had inherited. In the meeting house, when the town was established in an orderly way, a proper regard was had to the position of the families and individuals. Often the house was finished by degrees. At first benches would be put in. Then some one who wished a place of his own would procure the deed of a space on the floor, some six feet square, and on th
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