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Mount Auburn (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
y. It is a difficult and complicated subject. but the material now being gathered and preserved will inevitably lead to a great expansion of our present knowledge. The grave of Agassiz The Agassiz Museum. Many pilgrims go out to Mount Auburn, the Westminster Abbey of America, and few of them fail to stop and pay their tribute of respect before the tomb of Agassiz. There is a nobler monument to the great scientist, however, than even that noble tomb. His name and life work are pefrom room to room and from gallery to gallery, and seeing the crowded cases, one begins to appreciate in a degree the labor which has been expended upon the Museum, and learns to honor the memory of Agassiz more even than by the tomb in sacred Mount Auburn. From the Agassiz Museum proper, one passes into the Botanical and Mineralogical Museums. These occupy sections of the University Museum building adjoining the Zoological Museum. The mineralogical exhibition is extensive and interesting.
ray's private library, and he started it so early that he was able to secure many publications now exceedingly rare. A Flora of Greece like one in this library sold recently for eight hundred dollars, and this work is no more rare or valuable than several others to be found here. Some of the books are artistic treasures. One in particular, Flora Danica, is beautiful enough for a modern art book. This is in eighteen folio volumes, descriptive or rather illustrative, of the flora of northern Europe. The difficulty of the task accomplished in it is indicated by the fact that it was one hundred ears in being published. Every page contains a perfect reproduction in color of every part of some plant-flower, leafage, roots. The work is so natural that one seems to be looking at the real flower. Each picture is accompanied by the botanical description. Indeed this book is a sort of more beautiful and less perishable herbarium of the region it covers. One of the treasured books
Yucatan (Yucatan, Mexico) (search for this): chapter 11
e of these came. Photographs, indeed, are a feature of this Museum. On every floor, in almost every room, are photographs of the regions represented. In the lecture hall, also, is a model of the serpent mound of Hamilton County, Ohio. which belongs to the Peabody Museum. It was purchased with a special gift of $8,000, and is kept as a park, while explorations are carried on in the vicinity. The entrance to the lecture hall is guarded by two carved and weather-beaten stone idols from Yucatan. Just inside the door is a cast of an Assyrian relief dating back to the ninth century B. C. This latter properly belongs in the room overhead, where the Semitic department of the University has a fine collection of Assyrian and other Eastern casts and remains. By courtesy, this collection is given a place in the Peabody Museum, until a place of its own can be provided. It is for the study of American archaeology and Ethnology that the Peabody Museum is maintained. Especial attention
Chicago (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
ong wait for the glass, the telescope was begun and successfully completed. Before it left the workshop of the Clarks it made them famous by their discovery, through it, of the companion star of Sirius. For this, as the most interesting discovery of the year, the French Academy of Sciences awarded Mr. Clark the Lalande medal. The telescope was finished in 1863, but did not go to Mississippi on account of the breaking out of the Civil War. Instead, it was sold to a private association in Chicago. From that time the size of the aperture of telescopes has steadily increased. The Clarks have several times been privileged to have in their workshop glasses larger than any before made. One of the best known of these is the twenty-six inch glass now at the National Observatory in Washington. This, with its twin, made at the same time and sold into private hands, long held the place of the largest telescope in the world. It was completed in 1873. Again and again, however, this aper
Arequipa (Peru) (search for this): chapter 11
marked, and can be studied at leisure. The most interesting of all the photographic telescopes is the new Bruce telescope. This has an aperture of twenty-four inches, and is the largest photographic telescope yet made. The glass is by Alvan Clark of our city. This telescope has been in use now for more than a year, and it reveals stars that never have been seen by the eye, even in the largest telescopes. It is designed to send the Bruce telescope, eventually, to the station at Arequipa, Peru. This station is an integral part of Harvard Observatory. Situated high in the Andes, it possesses unrivalled meteorological advantages. The air is wonderfully clear and pure. Add to these natural advantages the fact that it is almost the only observatory in the southern hemisphere, and its importance will be appreciated. The Bruce telescope will be an important addition to its facilities. The photographs are stored in a commodious building where a gifted woman, Mrs. Fleming, wit
South America (search for this): chapter 11
e ninth century B. C. This latter properly belongs in the room overhead, where the Semitic department of the University has a fine collection of Assyrian and other Eastern casts and remains. By courtesy, this collection is given a place in the Peabody Museum, until a place of its own can be provided. It is for the study of American archaeology and Ethnology that the Peabody Museum is maintained. Especial attention is given to North American tribes, although articles from Central and South America are welcomed. For the study of the race history of our own continent, it is desirable, even necessary, to have articles for comparison from other parts of the world. Antiquities from any source are welcome if only they are properly verified. Articles illustrating modern life among the uncivilized and partly civilized peoples of the East are also received. It would not be desirable here to catalogue the curious, interesting and instructive exhibitions which have been so skilfully d
Russia (Russia) (search for this): chapter 11
accurate means of obtaining the exact position of stars. These positions are recorded in the star catalogue. It is also the most accurate means of obtaining true time. Until very recently Boston obtained its true noon from this observatory. Now, however, the time is telegraphed daily from the observatory at Washington, and the Harvard time service has been discontinued. A beautiful little brass instrument in the same room, not more than three feet high, is a transit instrument made in Russia. It can be used, like the meridian circle, for obtaining the time of meridian transit of stars, but not for declinations, as there is no circle attached to it. The astronomical clock is in the basement, and is interesting to look at with its three dials, one for each of the three hands. It is regulated to sidereal time; that is, it makes its round of twenty-four hours between two successive passages of the same star over the meridian, thus gaining about four minutes a day over solar tim
Australia (Australia) (search for this): chapter 11
rywhere, and there is a wealth of color. Here are orchids in beautiful or fantastic shapes; and cacti, their dainty, rich-colored, fragile blossoms contrasting strangely with the prickly, forbidding foliage. Here are beautiful palms, reaching to the top of the high arched ceiling, and graceful ferns, rivalling the palms for size and beauty. New plants and trees are frequently received. Sometimes it is a matter of difficulty to keep them alive. A new tree fern has arrived recently from Australia, absolutely bare of foliage; yet it is hoped to make it live and flourish in its new surroundings. Harvard has other resources for the study of botany. Important and valuable as is the Botanical Garden, the Herbarium, in the hands of a skilful botanist, who alone is competent to use it, is much more valuable, because more complete. A good library, too, is an essential for thorough work in botany. Harvard is fortunate in having perhaps the best herbarium in existence, together with on
Hamilton County, Ohio (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
ed exhibition — masks from New Guinea, wax models of different tribes of Indians and Esquimaux, skeletons of different races, implements of war and peace, articles used in religious ceremonies. These are mostly modern. There are photographs, too, of the places whence some of these came. Photographs, indeed, are a feature of this Museum. On every floor, in almost every room, are photographs of the regions represented. In the lecture hall, also, is a model of the serpent mound of Hamilton County, Ohio. which belongs to the Peabody Museum. It was purchased with a special gift of $8,000, and is kept as a park, while explorations are carried on in the vicinity. The entrance to the lecture hall is guarded by two carved and weather-beaten stone idols from Yucatan. Just inside the door is a cast of an Assyrian relief dating back to the ninth century B. C. This latter properly belongs in the room overhead, where the Semitic department of the University has a fine collection of Assy
Observatory Hill (Wisconsin, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
it and other heavenly bodies to advantage. Accordingly a meeting of prominent men was called in Boston, with the result that sufficient money was raised to purchase a telescope of the largest size. In August of that very year work was begun on the foundations of the great stone pier on which such a telescope must be supported; and from that day to this, the observatory has not lacked the best of modern equipments. It was an exciting day when the completed telescope was mounted on Observatory Hill. It was the largest refracting telescope in the world save one. That other one was of the same aperture (fifteen inches) and had been ordered at the same time with ours for the observatory at Pulkowa. In these days telescopes of twenty-five inches and over are not uncommon. Our fifteen inch instrument would look like a pigmy by the side of the forty inch Yerkes telescope. Yet even at the present day the Harvard instrument is remarkably fine. Its clearness and defining power are un
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