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Auburn, N. Y. (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
y of Longfellow's poems do we trace this love for the river, which flows ever on past the windows from which he used to exult in its ever-changing, never-wearying beauty! The broad meadows and the steel-blue river remind me of the meadows of Unterseen and the river Aar; and beyond them rise magnificent snow-white clouds, piled up like Alps. Thus the shades of George Washington and William Tell seem to walk together on these Elysian fields. Dearer was the river to the poet for the name, which reminded him of three friends, all true and tried, and how tender is the later good-night to one of these, a friend, who bore thy name, sleeping in sweet Auburn, around which the river still steals with such silent pace. Others have written too of our river, ours and the world's, but the cool wind blows more freshly, reminding us that this is still March. We look across to the Brighton meadows, look once more where the Charles writes the last letter of his name, and then turn homeward.
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
l of money, and various expedients were adopted to aid Cambridge in her bearing of what was justly considered a heavy burden for the poor little town. Brighton, Newton, Lexington and Middlesex County itself helped to keep the bridge in repair, and even the General Court occasionally granted money on its account. It would take too long to review in detail all the important events that have happened here, such as the brilliant scene in 1716 when Colonel Shute, the newly made governor of Massachusetts and New Hampshire, was met at the bridge by Spencer Phips, Esq., with his Troop of Horse, the Sheriff of Middlesex and other gentlement of the County, and conducted by them to Harvard College, where he was entertained with a long oration, all in Latin. It was nearly sixty years after that gala day, that the planks of the Great Bridge were hastily torn up and piled along the Cambridge side in order to impede the march of Lord Percy's advancing reinforcements, on the nineteenth of April
New Hampshire (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
rious expedients were adopted to aid Cambridge in her bearing of what was justly considered a heavy burden for the poor little town. Brighton, Newton, Lexington and Middlesex County itself helped to keep the bridge in repair, and even the General Court occasionally granted money on its account. It would take too long to review in detail all the important events that have happened here, such as the brilliant scene in 1716 when Colonel Shute, the newly made governor of Massachusetts and New Hampshire, was met at the bridge by Spencer Phips, Esq., with his Troop of Horse, the Sheriff of Middlesex and other gentlement of the County, and conducted by them to Harvard College, where he was entertained with a long oration, all in Latin. It was nearly sixty years after that gala day, that the planks of the Great Bridge were hastily torn up and piled along the Cambridge side in order to impede the march of Lord Percy's advancing reinforcements, on the nineteenth of April, 1775. Then what
Copp's Hill (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
op seems to have had no notion of coming here to live; but we can have no quarrel with him on that score to-day, as we look across to the gilded dome and reflect that it is in its right place. There was a ferry at the foot of Dunster Street which served the colonists for twenty years before the Great Bridge was built. From the ferry a road led through Brookline and Roxbury into Boston, and whoever wished to take another route must make his way through Charlestown and across a ferry at Copp's Hill. That bridge cost a deal of money, and various expedients were adopted to aid Cambridge in her bearing of what was justly considered a heavy burden for the poor little town. Brighton, Newton, Lexington and Middlesex County itself helped to keep the bridge in repair, and even the General Court occasionally granted money on its account. It would take too long to review in detail all the important events that have happened here, such as the brilliant scene in 1716 when Colonel Shute, the
Middlesex Village (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
wn and across a ferry at Copp's Hill. That bridge cost a deal of money, and various expedients were adopted to aid Cambridge in her bearing of what was justly considered a heavy burden for the poor little town. Brighton, Newton, Lexington and Middlesex County itself helped to keep the bridge in repair, and even the General Court occasionally granted money on its account. It would take too long to review in detail all the important events that have happened here, such as the brilliant scene in 1716 when Colonel Shute, the newly made governor of Massachusetts and New Hampshire, was met at the bridge by Spencer Phips, Esq., with his Troop of Horse, the Sheriff of Middlesex and other gentlement of the County, and conducted by them to Harvard College, where he was entertained with a long oration, all in Latin. It was nearly sixty years after that gala day, that the planks of the Great Bridge were hastily torn up and piled along the Cambridge side in order to impede the march of Lor
Roxbury, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
ed a town called New Towne, now named Cambridge. Governor Winthrop and Dudley had a sharp controversy over this, and Winthrop seems to have had no notion of coming here to live; but we can have no quarrel with him on that score to-day, as we look across to the gilded dome and reflect that it is in its right place. There was a ferry at the foot of Dunster Street which served the colonists for twenty years before the Great Bridge was built. From the ferry a road led through Brookline and Roxbury into Boston, and whoever wished to take another route must make his way through Charlestown and across a ferry at Copp's Hill. That bridge cost a deal of money, and various expedients were adopted to aid Cambridge in her bearing of what was justly considered a heavy burden for the poor little town. Brighton, Newton, Lexington and Middlesex County itself helped to keep the bridge in repair, and even the General Court occasionally granted money on its account. It would take too long to re
Charles (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
hose who were in place of civil government, having some additional pillars to underprop the building, began to think of a place of more safety in the eyes of man than the two frontier towns of Boston and Charlestown were, for the habitation of such as the Lord had prepared to govern this pilgrim people. Wherefore they rather made choice to enter further among the Indians than hazard the fury of malignant adversaries who in a rage might pursue them, and therefore chose a place situate on Charles River, between Charles Towne and Water Towne, where they erected a town called New Towne, now named Cambridge. Governor Winthrop and Dudley had a sharp controversy over this, and Winthrop seems to have had no notion of coming here to live; but we can have no quarrel with him on that score to-day, as we look across to the gilded dome and reflect that it is in its right place. There was a ferry at the foot of Dunster Street which served the colonists for twenty years before the Great Bridge
Brookline (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
re they erected a town called New Towne, now named Cambridge. Governor Winthrop and Dudley had a sharp controversy over this, and Winthrop seems to have had no notion of coming here to live; but we can have no quarrel with him on that score to-day, as we look across to the gilded dome and reflect that it is in its right place. There was a ferry at the foot of Dunster Street which served the colonists for twenty years before the Great Bridge was built. From the ferry a road led through Brookline and Roxbury into Boston, and whoever wished to take another route must make his way through Charlestown and across a ferry at Copp's Hill. That bridge cost a deal of money, and various expedients were adopted to aid Cambridge in her bearing of what was justly considered a heavy burden for the poor little town. Brighton, Newton, Lexington and Middlesex County itself helped to keep the bridge in repair, and even the General Court occasionally granted money on its account. It would take t
John Smith (search for this): chapter 15
, seem sometimes far away, but it brings them a little nearer to remember that he was only a prince, Baby Charles as they used to call him, at the time when Captain John Smith gave his name to the just-discovered and disappointing river. No Hudson was this beguiling stream, which promised much in its wide welcome to the eager adventurers, but soon betrayed its secret of dependence on the ebb and flow of the tides, confessing its narrow banks and its country manners. Little did sturdy Captain Smith imagine that these same banks would one day give peace and protection to the judges of his unfortunate ruler. The regicides, Goffe and Whalley, came in the samned and feasted them with great solemnity say the old records, and the river rippled on, unashamed of its name. The name and nothing more was the bequest of Captain Smith to the stream. The first event of its witnessing that nearly concerns us was the semi-military picnic, as Colonel Higginson aptly calls it, two hundred and s
ld records, and the river rippled on, unashamed of its name. The name and nothing more was the bequest of Captain Smith to the stream. The first event of its witnessing that nearly concerns us was the semi-military picnic, as Colonel Higginson aptly calls it, two hundred and sixty-five years ago, when an exploring party came hither, seeking a place for a fortified town which should be the seat of government. Deputy-governor Dudley was the ruling spirit in the choice of this place, and Johnson describes the plan in such quaint words as these: At this time, those who were in place of civil government, having some additional pillars to underprop the building, began to think of a place of more safety in the eyes of man than the two frontier towns of Boston and Charlestown were, for the habitation of such as the Lord had prepared to govern this pilgrim people. Wherefore they rather made choice to enter further among the Indians than hazard the fury of malignant adversaries who in a
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