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Wellesley (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
Life at Radcliffe. Martha Trimble Bennett. Life at Radcliffe does not lend itself easily to description. There are few picturesque details which can be seized upon,--no float day as at Wellesley, no ivy and tree planting, none of the gay dormitory life which is so distinctive a feature at most women's colleges. A large number of the students live at home, and those who come from a distance find boarding-places in private families where only a limited number of girls can be received. It seems probable, however, that a few years will see the establishment of small dormitories accommodating from twelve to twenty students, for as the college grows, the need of such dormitories is felt. At present, however, the girls are scattered over Cambridge in twos and threes, and life at Radcliffe is so largely a matter of the individual that it is difficult to hit upon any description which shall be at all representative. The girls who live in or near Cambridge, going home at night, and
New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 20
es, and life at Radcliffe is so largely a matter of the individual that it is difficult to hit upon any description which shall be at all representative. The girls who live in or near Cambridge, going home at night, and having their own circle of friends outside the college, can have but little idea of what life at Radcliffe means to the student who comes from a distance and who knows no one except the friends whom she may chance to make among her fellow-students. Again, to girls from New England the atmosphere of thought and study which invests Radcliffe is too familiar to be worth comment, whereas to the Southern or Western girls it is one of the most novel features of the life, and one of the most attractive even though it may be a bit discouraging at first. Everything is intellectual here, said a Western girl last year in anything but a cheerful tone; even inanimate objects seem to possess intelligence. Yesterday the maid came in to fill my lamp, and as she filled it, the
Radcliffe (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
Life at Radcliffe. Martha Trimble Bennett. Life at Radcliffe does not lend itself easily to description.Radcliffe does not lend itself easily to description. There are few picturesque details which can be seized upon,--no float day as at Wellesley, no ivy and tree plred over Cambridge in twos and threes, and life at Radcliffe is so largely a matter of the individual that it i college, can have but little idea of what life at Radcliffe means to the student who comes from a distance andtelligent-oil-can atmosphere which the stranger at Radcliffe finds in her college life. and it is at once depras and theatres, and to be present at almost every Radcliffe festivity during the year. As may be guessed from this, a life at Radcliffe does not mean all work and no play for even the hardest workers. It is a signific One of the most delightful features of life at Radcliffe is the opportunity afforded the students for meeti constantly growing feeling that they will be better and wiser women for their four years life at Radcliffe.
Martha Trimble Bennett (search for this): chapter 20
Life at Radcliffe. Martha Trimble Bennett. Life at Radcliffe does not lend itself easily to description. There are few picturesque details which can be seized upon,--no float day as at Wellesley, no ivy and tree planting, none of the gay dormitory life which is so distinctive a feature at most women's colleges. A large number of the students live at home, and those who come from a distance find boarding-places in private families where only a limited number of girls can be received. It seems probable, however, that a few years will see the establishment of small dormitories accommodating from twelve to twenty students, for as the college grows, the need of such dormitories is felt. At present, however, the girls are scattered over Cambridge in twos and threes, and life at Radcliffe is so largely a matter of the individual that it is difficult to hit upon any description which shall be at all representative. The girls who live in or near Cambridge, going home at night, and
tudents. Again, to girls from New England the atmosphere of thought and study which invests Radcliffe is too familiar to be worth comment, whereas to the Southern or Western girls it is one of the very level-headed, her work will soon drive her into becoming what is popularly denominated a Radcliffe grind. It is a curious fact, by the way, that no girl is proud of being called a grind. No College was the Idler which has for its object amusement pure and simple. Few persons except Radcliffe students realize the large part which this club plays in the social life of the college. Its e clubs, the social element is represented by the Graduate Club, one of the most hospitable of Radcliffe organizations, and also by the teas which Mrs. Agassiz gives to the students on Wednesday aftellu the African explorer, and Prof. Charles Eliot Norton. Beside these occasional lectures, Radcliffe students have always the privilege of personal intercourse with the best and wisest of the Har
Humphrey Ward (search for this): chapter 20
special students have their separate organizations, in which pleasure and business seem to have about equal importance. One of the most delightful features of life at Radcliffe is the opportunity afforded the students for meeting or hearing so many prominent men and women, and that this privilege is theirs is largely due to the courtesy of Harvard. Certainly it is a privilege to be appreciated when it means hearing such widely different men as General Booth of the Salvation Army, Mr. Humphrey Ward, M. Du Chaillu the African explorer, and Prof. Charles Eliot Norton. Beside these occasional lectures, Radcliffe students have always the privilege of personal intercourse with the best and wisest of the Harvard professors. Surely the Radcliffe girl need not envy girls from other colleges. Other colleges may have broader grounds and wider halls, none has broader culture and wider opportunities for development. If ebullitions of college spirit seem somewhat lacking among the girls
Louis Agassiz (search for this): chapter 20
Philosophical, Historical, Music, Glee and Banjo. All of these exist primarily for work, but a goodly social element is not lacking, and each club keeps open house at least once a year, when it has for its honored guest some man or woman well known in the world of scholars who speaks to the club on some interesting topic. Beside all of these clubs, the social element is represented by the Graduate Club, one of the most hospitable of Radcliffe organizations, and also by the teas which Mrs. Agassiz gives to the students on Wednesday afternoons during the year. In addition the four classes and the special students have their separate organizations, in which pleasure and business seem to have about equal importance. One of the most delightful features of life at Radcliffe is the opportunity afforded the students for meeting or hearing so many prominent men and women, and that this privilege is theirs is largely due to the courtesy of Harvard. Certainly it is a privilege to be ap
M. Du Chaillu (search for this): chapter 20
have their separate organizations, in which pleasure and business seem to have about equal importance. One of the most delightful features of life at Radcliffe is the opportunity afforded the students for meeting or hearing so many prominent men and women, and that this privilege is theirs is largely due to the courtesy of Harvard. Certainly it is a privilege to be appreciated when it means hearing such widely different men as General Booth of the Salvation Army, Mr. Humphrey Ward, M. Du Chaillu the African explorer, and Prof. Charles Eliot Norton. Beside these occasional lectures, Radcliffe students have always the privilege of personal intercourse with the best and wisest of the Harvard professors. Surely the Radcliffe girl need not envy girls from other colleges. Other colleges may have broader grounds and wider halls, none has broader culture and wider opportunities for development. If ebullitions of college spirit seem somewhat lacking among the girls, there is, never
Charles Eliot Norton (search for this): chapter 20
leasure and business seem to have about equal importance. One of the most delightful features of life at Radcliffe is the opportunity afforded the students for meeting or hearing so many prominent men and women, and that this privilege is theirs is largely due to the courtesy of Harvard. Certainly it is a privilege to be appreciated when it means hearing such widely different men as General Booth of the Salvation Army, Mr. Humphrey Ward, M. Du Chaillu the African explorer, and Prof. Charles Eliot Norton. Beside these occasional lectures, Radcliffe students have always the privilege of personal intercourse with the best and wisest of the Harvard professors. Surely the Radcliffe girl need not envy girls from other colleges. Other colleges may have broader grounds and wider halls, none has broader culture and wider opportunities for development. If ebullitions of college spirit seem somewhat lacking among the girls, there is, nevertheless, a deep and loving respect for the alma
. In addition the four classes and the special students have their separate organizations, in which pleasure and business seem to have about equal importance. One of the most delightful features of life at Radcliffe is the opportunity afforded the students for meeting or hearing so many prominent men and women, and that this privilege is theirs is largely due to the courtesy of Harvard. Certainly it is a privilege to be appreciated when it means hearing such widely different men as General Booth of the Salvation Army, Mr. Humphrey Ward, M. Du Chaillu the African explorer, and Prof. Charles Eliot Norton. Beside these occasional lectures, Radcliffe students have always the privilege of personal intercourse with the best and wisest of the Harvard professors. Surely the Radcliffe girl need not envy girls from other colleges. Other colleges may have broader grounds and wider halls, none has broader culture and wider opportunities for development. If ebullitions of college spiri
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