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New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 10
Book X: unsuccessful settlements in New England. (A. D. 1602-1607.) The narrative of Captain Gosnold's adventures is taken from John Brereton's Brief and True Relation of the Discovery of the North Part of Virginia: being a most pleasant, fru176-180. I.—Gosnold's fort at Cuttyhunk. [Gosnold was the first Englishman who attempted to found a colony in New England; and this account of his attempt is by his companion, John Brereton.] To the Honorable Sir Walter Raleigh, Knight Probably a boat obtained from some Basque vessel. The Basques, or Biscayans, were among the first to engage in the New England fisheries. with mast and sail, an iron grapple, and a kettle of copper, came boldly aboard us, one of them apparelled his was the end of that northern colony upon the River Sachadehoc. This was the first colony that spent a winter in New England,—thirteen years before the Plymouth Colony arrived. The winter was an unusually severe one; and, moreover, the chief
Topsham (Maine, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
iscovered by the diligence of Captain Gilbert, had not the winter proved so extreme unseasonable and frosty; for it being in the year 1607, when the extraordinary frost was felt in most parts of Europe, it was here likewise as vehement, by which no boat could stir upon any business. Howbeit, as time and occasion gave leave, there was nothing omitted which could add unto the benefit or knowledge of the planters, for which when Captain Davies arrived there in the year following,—set out from Topsham, the port town of Exeter, with a ship laden full of victuals, arms, instruments, and tools, &c.,—albeit he found Mr. George Popham, the president, and some other dead, yet he found all things in good forwardness, and many kinds of furs obtained from the Indians by way of trade, good store of sarsaparilla gathered, and the new pinnace all finished. But by reason that Captain Gilbert received letters that his brother was newly dead, and a fair portion of land fallen unto his share, which req
Parkers Island (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
eir plantation. They sailed up into the river near forty leagues, and found it to be a very gallant river, very deep, and seldom less water than three fathom,. . . whereupon they proceeded no farther, but, in their return homewards, observed many goodly islands therein, and many branches of other small rivers falling into it. They all went ashore, and there made choice of a James I. place for their plantation, This place was at one time supposed to have been what is now called Parker's Island; but is now thought to have been Cape Small Point on the main land, near the site of the present Fort Popham. at the mouth or entry of the river on the west side,—for the river bendeth itself towards the nora — east, and by east,—being almost an island, of a good bigness, being in a province called by the Indians Sabino, so called of a sagamo, or chief commander, under the grand Bassaba. Higher chief. As they were ashore, three canoes full of Indians came to them, but would not come <
Canada (Canada) (search for this): chapter 10
ver. They all went ashore where they had made choice of their plantation, and where they had a sermon delivered unto them by their preacher; and, after the sermon, the president's commission was read, with the laws to be observed and kept. George Popham, gent., Gentleman. was nominated president. Captain Raleigh Gilbert, James Davies, Richard Lymer, preacher, Captain Richard Davies, Captain Harlow, the same who brought away the savages at this time showed in London, from the river of Canada, were all sworn assistants; and so they returned back again. Aug. 20. All went to shore again, and there began to intrench and make a fort, and to build a storehouse. . . . You may please to understand how, whilst this business was thus followed here, soon after their first arrival, that [they] had despatched away Captain Robert Davies, in the Mary and John, to advertise of their safe arrival and forwardness of their plantation within this River of Sachadehoc, with letters to the lord
with our ship about six and twenty miles, of which I had rather not write than by my relation to detract from the worthiness thereof. . . . As we passed with a gentle wind up with our ship in this river, any man may conceive with what admiration we all consented Agreed. in joy. Many of our company who had been travellers in sundry countries, and in the most famous rivers, yet affirmed them not comparable to this they now beheld. Some that were with Sir Walter Raleigh in his voyage to Guiana, in the discovery of the River Orenoque, Orinoco. which echoed fame to the world's ears, gave reasons why it was not to be compared with this, which wanteth the danger of many shoals and broken ground, wherewith that was encumbered. Others before that notable river in the West Indies called Rio Grande; some before the River of Loire, the River Seine, and of Bourdeaux, in France, which, although they be great and goodly rivers, yet it is no detraction from them to be accounted inferior to
Elizabeth's Island (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
ch valued as a medicine. cedar, firs, skins, and other commodities, as were thought convenient, some of our company that had promised Captain Gosnold to stay, having nothing but a saving Profitable. voyage in their minds, made our company of inhabitants, which was small enough before, much smaller; so as That. Captain Gosnold seeing his whole strength to consist but of twelve men, and they but meanly provided, determined to return for England, leaving this island, which he called Elizabeth's Island, Now called by its Indian name of Cuttyhunk. with as many true sorrowful eyes as were before desirous to see it. So the 18th of June, being Friday, we weighed, and with indifferent fair wind and weather came to anchor the 23d of July, being also Friday, in all bare five weeks, before Exmouth. Your Lordship's to command, John Brereton. Ii.—Captain Waymooth captures Indians, and explores the Penobscot River. [Captain George Waymouth, or Weymouth, sailed from England in 1
Popham (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 10
eat wonder, and crowds of people followed them in the streets. It is thought that Shakspeare may have referred to them in the Tempest, written a few years later, about 1610. Trinculo there wishes to take the monster Caliban to England, and says, Not a holiday fool there but would give a piece of silver; there would this monster make a man; any strange beast there makes a man. When they will not give a doit to relieve a lame beggar, they will lay out ten to see a dead Indian.] III.—The Popham colony on the Kennebec. [so much interest was excited by the voyages of Gosnold and Waymouth, that two companies were formed in England for the settlement of America,—the London company and the Plymouth company. Each company sent out a colony in 1606; but the ship sent by the Plymouth company was taken by a Spanish fleet, while the other colony reached Virginia. Then in June, 1607, the Plymouth company sent another colony, under command of Captain George Popham, he being in a vessel c
Kennebec (Maine, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
, 1607, the Plymouth company sent another colony, under command of Captain George Popham, he being in a vessel called the gift of God, accompanied by the Mary and John, Captain Raleigh Gilbert. They reached the mouth of the River Sachadehoc, or Kennebec, in August; and the narrative proceeds as follows, as told by Strachey, secretary of the Virginia Colony.] Captain Popham, in his pinnace, with thirty persons, and Captain Gilbert in his long-boat, with eighteen persons more, went early in thhat the colony might have remained; and, in that case, Maine would have been settled only a year later than Virginia. Iv.—Captain Gilbert's adventure with the Indians. [Captain Gilbert, the companion of Captain Popham, went up the River Kennebec, or Sachadehoc, in a shallop with nineteen men, and had this adventure with Indians.] In the morning there came a canoe unto them, and in her a sagamo Chief. and four savages,—some of those which spoke to them the night before. The sagamo
Bourdeaux (France) (search for this): chapter 10
rs, yet affirmed them not comparable to this they now beheld. Some that were with Sir Walter Raleigh in his voyage to Guiana, in the discovery of the River Orenoque, Orinoco. which echoed fame to the world's ears, gave reasons why it was not to be compared with this, which wanteth the danger of many shoals and broken ground, wherewith that was encumbered. Others before that notable river in the West Indies called Rio Grande; some before the River of Loire, the River Seine, and of Bourdeaux, in France, which, although they be great and goodly rivers, yet it is no detraction from them to be accounted inferior to this, which not only yieldeth all the aforesaid pleasant profits, but also appeareth infallibly to us free from all inconveniences. I will not prefer it before our River of Thames, because it is England's richest treasure; but we all did wish those excellent harbors, good deeps in a continual convenient breadth, and small tide-gates, to be as well therein for our country'
Cape Cod (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
gns they made, that some Basques, or of St. John de Luz, A port in the Bay of Biscay. have fished or traded in this place, being in the latitude of forty-three degrees. But riding here, in no very good harbor, and withal doubting the weather, about three of the clock the same day, in the afternoon, we weighed, and standing southerly off into sea the rest of that day and the night following, with a fresh gale of wind, in the morning we found ourselves embayed with a mighty headland. Cape Cod. But coming to an anchor about nine of the clock the same day, within a league of the shore, we hoisted out the one-half of our shallop; and Captain Bartholomew Gosnold, myself, and three others, went ashore, being a white, sandy, and bold shore; and marching all that afternoon, with our muskets on our necks, on the highest hills which we saw,—the weather very hot,—at length we perceived this headland to be parcel of the main, and sundry islands lying almost round about it. So returning to
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