hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
New England (United States) 86 0 Browse Search
John Smith 58 8 Browse Search
Canadian Indians 54 0 Browse Search
France (France) 52 0 Browse Search
Henry Greene 38 0 Browse Search
Montreal (Canada) 36 0 Browse Search
Raleigh Gilbert 30 2 Browse Search
John Ortiz 26 0 Browse Search
Jacques Cartier 26 0 Browse Search
Bartholomew Gosnold 25 1 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Thomas Wentworth Higginson, A book of American explorers. Search the whole document.

Found 203 total hits in 50 results.

1 2 3 4 5
Salem (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
was two leagues and something more from the harbor at Naimkecke, Afterwards Salem. where our ships were to rest, and the plantation is already begun. But becausy soil; in other, gravel; in other, sandy, as it is all about our plantation at Salem; for so our town is now named. First Church in Salem. The form of the eaSalem. The form of the earth here, in the superficies of it, is neither too flat in the plainness, nor too high in hills, but partakes of both in a mediocrity, and fit for pasture, or for pl of excellent harbors for ships, as at Cape Ann, and at Masathulets Bay, and at Salem, and at many other places; and they are the better, because for strangers therer, except the party stinged have about him some of the Old Planter's house at Salem. root of an herb called snake-weed to bite on; and then he shall receive no harerness in respect of English. There were, indeed, some English at Plymouth and Salem, and some few at Charlestown, who were very destitute when we came ashore; and,
Gravesend (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 15
lthful when they come to sea, the younger they are, the Francis Higginson. better they will endure the sea, and are not troubled with sea-sickness as older people are, as we had experience in many children that went this voyage. My wife, indeed, in tossing weather, was something ill; . . . but in calm weather she recovered again, and is now much better for the sea-sickness. And for my own part, whereas I have for divers years past been very sickly, . . . and was very sick at London and Gravesend, yet from the time I came on shipboard to this day I have been strangely healthful; and now I can digest our ship diet very well, which I could not when I was at land. . . . Also divers children were sick of the smallpox, but are safely recovered again; and two or three passengers, towards the latter end of the voyage, fell sick of the scurvy, but, coming to land, recovered in a short time. Fourthly, our passage was both pleasurable and profitable; for we received instruction and delig
Salem Harbor (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
countenance, and, as it were, full of high hills and deep valleys; and sometimes it appeared as a most plain and even meadow. And ever and anon we saw divers kinds of fishes sporting in the great waters, great grampuses and huge whales going by companies, and puffing up water-streams. Those that love their own chimney-corner, and dare not go far beyond their own town's end, shall never have the honor to see these wonderful works of Almighty God. Ii.—The Massachusetts Bay colonists in Salem harbor. Friday a foggy morning, but after clear, and wind calm. We saw many schools of mackerel, infinite multitudes on every side of our ship. The sea was abundantly stored with rockweed and yellow flowers like gilliflowers. By noon we were within three leagues of Cape Ann; and, as we sailed along the coasts, we saw every hill and dale, and every island, full of gay woods and high trees. The nearer we came to the shore, the more flowers in abundance,—sometimes scattered abroad, sometimes
Medford (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
pieces of ordnance, and her two consorts, bound for the straits; a ship of Flushing, and a Frenchman, and three other English ships, bound for Canada and Newfoundland. So, when we drew near, every ship, as they met, saluted each other, and the musketeers discharged their small shot; and so, God be praised! our fear and danger was turned into mirth and friendly entertainment. V.—Governor Winthrop's night out of doors. The governor, being at his farm-house at Mistick, A part of Medford, Mass. The farm still retains the name which he gave it,—Ten-Hills Farm. walked out after supper, and took a piece Gun. in his hand, supposing he might see a wolf; for they came daily about the house, and killed swine and calves, &c. And, being about half a mile off, it grew suddenly dark, so as in coming home he mistook his path, and went till he came to a little house of Sagamore John, This chief is described by Governor Dudley as a handsome young man, conversant with us, affecting En
New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 15
us all desirous to see our new paradise of New England, whence we saw such forerunning signal igly. Iii.—Fire, air, earth, and water in New England. [as described by Francis Higginson, 1ill now begin our discourse on the shore of New England. And because the life and welfare of everydistant. Of the water of New England. New England hath water enough, both salt and fresh. Thheir coming was begun when we came first to New England in June, and so continued about three months which they have killed. Of the fire of New England. Thus you have heard of the earth, water, and air of New England. Now it may be you expect something to be said of the fire, proportionablhe rest of the elements. Indeed, I think New England may boast of this element more than of all r those that love good fires. And although New England have no tallow to make candles of, yet, by and grandchildren of the first planters of New England have better hearts and are more heavenly th[15 more...]
Flushing, L. I. (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
, and his care and diligence, did much encourage us. It was now about one of the clock, and the fleet seemed to be within a league of us: therefore our captain, because he would show he was not afraid of them, and that he might see the issue before night should overtake us, tacked about, and stood to meet them. And, when we came near, we perceived them to be our friends,—the Little Neptune, a ship of some twenty pieces of ordnance, and her two consorts, bound for the straits; a ship of Flushing, and a Frenchman, and three other English ships, bound for Canada and Newfoundland. So, when we drew near, every ship, as they met, saluted each other, and the musketeers discharged their small shot; and so, God be praised! our fear and danger was turned into mirth and friendly entertainment. V.—Governor Winthrop's night out of doors. The governor, being at his farm-house at Mistick, A part of Medford, Mass. The farm still retains the name which he gave it,—Ten-Hills Farm. walk<
Canada (Canada) (search for this): chapter 15
about one of the clock, and the fleet seemed to be within a league of us: therefore our captain, because he would show he was not afraid of them, and that he might see the issue before night should overtake us, tacked about, and stood to meet them. And, when we came near, we perceived them to be our friends,—the Little Neptune, a ship of some twenty pieces of ordnance, and her two consorts, bound for the straits; a ship of Flushing, and a Frenchman, and three other English ships, bound for Canada and Newfoundland. So, when we drew near, every ship, as they met, saluted each other, and the musketeers discharged their small shot; and so, God be praised! our fear and danger was turned into mirth and friendly entertainment. V.—Governor Winthrop's night out of doors. The governor, being at his farm-house at Mistick, A part of Medford, Mass. The farm still retains the name which he gave it,—Ten-Hills Farm. walked out after supper, and took a piece Gun. in his hand, supposin<
Lincolnshire (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 15
, which are so full of turpentine and pitch, that they burn as clear as a torch. I have sent you some of them that you may see the experience of them. A New England's Discommodities. inconveniences. Thus of New England's commodities. Now I will tell you of some discommodities that are here to be found. First, in the summer season, for these three months June, July, and August, we are troubled much with little flies called mosquitoes, being the same they are troubled with in Lincolnshire and the fens; and they are nothing but gnats, which, except they be smoked out of their houses, are troublesome in the night season. Secondly, in the winter season, for two months space, the earth is commonly covered with snow, which is accompanied with sharp, biting frosts, something more sharp than is in Old England, and therefore are forced to make great fires. Thirdly, this country, being very full of woods and wildernesses, doth also much abound with snakes and serpents, of st
Massachusetts Bay (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
Book XV: the Massachusetts Bay colony. (A. D. 1629-1631.) The first of these extracts is from Rev. Francis Higginson's True Relation of the Last Voyage to New England, written from New England, July 24, 1629, reprinted in Young's Chronicles of the First Planters of the Colony of Massachusetts Bay: Boston, 1846 (pp. 235-237). The second is from the same work: (Young, pp. 232-235). The third is from New England's Plantation; or, A Short and True Description of the Commodities and Discommodities of that Country, by Francis Higginson: London, 1630: (Young, pp. 242-256). This pamphlet attracted so much attention, that three distinct editions of it were published in a year. The next two passages are from Life and Letters of John Winthrop (vol. II. pp. 15-16, 64-65). The last passage is from the Memoirs of Captain Roger Clap: (Young, pp. 351-354). I.—The voyage of the Massachusetts colonists. [the first large colony of the Massachusetts Bay company sailed from England i
Newfoundland (Canada) (search for this): chapter 15
he clock, and the fleet seemed to be within a league of us: therefore our captain, because he would show he was not afraid of them, and that he might see the issue before night should overtake us, tacked about, and stood to meet them. And, when we came near, we perceived them to be our friends,—the Little Neptune, a ship of some twenty pieces of ordnance, and her two consorts, bound for the straits; a ship of Flushing, and a Frenchman, and three other English ships, bound for Canada and Newfoundland. So, when we drew near, every ship, as they met, saluted each other, and the musketeers discharged their small shot; and so, God be praised! our fear and danger was turned into mirth and friendly entertainment. V.—Governor Winthrop's night out of doors. The governor, being at his farm-house at Mistick, A part of Medford, Mass. The farm still retains the name which he gave it,—Ten-Hills Farm. walked out after supper, and took a piece Gun. in his hand, supposing he might see<
1 2 3 4 5